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6

You want to add either all of it, or just the vodka. A lot of the chocolate flavor will get leached into the alcohol so you don't want to toss that. I'd say add it all if you're going into secondary, since you'd rack it again, or just the vodka if adding it at bottling time. A benefit of this technique is that it lets you remove any fats from the chocolate ...


6

Campden doesn't kill cultured yeast, at least not at the levels you'd want to use it at without significantly hindering the flavor and aroma of your beer. The problem with using Campden (Potassium Metabisulfite) is that it adds significant levels of free and bound SO2 to your beer. This will cause your beer to smell and taste like sulfur. Wine is ...


3

For most spices and nuts, you roast them just until they become aromatic. When I roast almonds I do them in the oven at 350F for 5-10 minutes, and then let them cool. Remember that dry things like that will maintain their heat for a good long while, and they will continue cooking (carry-over) for a few minutes after you remove them from the heat. ...


2

I did a coffee imperial stout that I use nibs in secondary. I did not roast them but I don't know how much the ones you have will differ from mine. These are the ones that I used. http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-24981/Scharffen-Berger-Cacao-Nibs The flavor after about 3 weeks in bottles was more of a bitter, unsweetened, dark, 100% cocoa flavor more ...


1

I hope this is not too self serving, but check out the white stout recipe is in the book "Experimental Homebrewing".


1

I would taste what you have extracted first to see if you like it. Making a tincture (in a solvent like ethanol/vodka) doesn't always result in the same flavor profile as if you had simply racked onto the raw nibs. Another option is to pull a sample of the beer then dose drop wise some of your tincture into it until the flavor is right. If you find a good ...



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