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7

There really aren't any mills that do a good job of both crushing grain for brewing and grinding it for bread. You have to sacrifice the performance of one or the other. The problem is that you're talking about 2 different end products. Grain for brewing needs to be crushed, and while you can crush it fine (I do) you don't want to completely pulverize it ...


6

I know I will never hand-crank a mill again :) That said, the type of mill you linked would not be useful for crushing grain. That's a food mill, which is used to squish soft foods through a steel grate. It would be good for crushing fruits for adding to beer, but not for crushing grain. If that's what you're looking for, you want a grain mill, which ...


6

Are you able to adjust the mill, so that it can mill more coarsely than you would want for flour? If so, I think you should be all set. When brewing all grain, you want a pretty coarse grind; you essentially just want to crack the kernels open, rather than pulverize them. This leaves the husks in tact, and they serve as a filter bed during the sparge ...


6

Milled grain does have a shorter shelf-life, but you don't need to worry about it unless you are trying to mill more than a month in advance. I used to get my grain milled and shipped to me and I would use it when I got around to doing a brew. I never noticed major taste differences within about a month of being milled, and I was just using cardboard boxes ...


3

I've built 2 motorized grain mills. The first used a 600w (input power) 3/8" drill. It worked well enough with a loose crush (0.040") but I ended up frying the drill when trying to crush at 0.035", so this is a good candidate to gauge the minimum torque. A 600W drill produces about 380W mechanical output. I was using this on just under half power - the ...


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


3

I am planning on buying a Country Living Mill, and I am both baking and brewing. I was researching if the mill could be used for crushing malt as well. A lot of people have been asking this question, but I've only found one person actually having tried it. According to him it crushes the malt nicely and leaves the husks. Here is the link: ...


3

Brew Strong made a great podcast about metals in beer. http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/Brew-Strong/Brew-Strong-09-29-08-Metals-that-Affect-Your-Beer It could potentially be some degrading or poor cleaning of your brew kettle. If your grinders blades actually touch that could definitely be it. You do want your grains to remain a little coarse. It ...


3

"The best solution for even, consistent mills is always the local HBS.". I'd have to disagree with that. All too often, I hear from people who get poor or inconsistent crushes from the LHBS due to constant readjustment of the mill there. The absolute best way to consistently get the crush that works best for you is to own your own mill. That may not be ...


2

From the information in your post your beer sounds green to me. Less experienced brewers tend to rush the process along, and they also have less than ideal fermentation practices. I'd recommend you start pitching 2X packs of dry yeast, or be sure to rehydrate the one you do use in clean sterile water. I'd also watch the fermentation temps and time. Let ...


2

I have no idea what the gap on my mill is set to, and I don't really care. Learn what a good crush looks like and how it acts in the mash tun, and settings won't matter to you. Not to mention, a setting that works with one person's system might not work for another's. Keep in mind that you're making grist, not gaps! The finer you mill your grain, the ...


2

I use a 2 roller mill and just close the gap to get the crush I want. No need for a 3 roller. Based on conversations with people who own mills, they're all pretty good no matter which you buy. I've used a JSP adjustable for 15 years and maybe a thousand batches, but all the people I know who have other brands are satisfied with them.


2

I recommend you get a 3 roller mill - then you will not need to crush everything twice. They cost only a little more - $175. The reason they are superior is that the first gap, which is a fixed width, gently breaks open the grain, preserving the husk. The second gap (created with the 3rd roller) is then the one you set to your final crush. This allows you ...


1

As brewchez indicated, flaked wheat can be used directly. However, if that isn't easily obtainable for you, your next best option is to use a blender. You can blend 1-2 cups at a time this way. It helps to add a little bit of water to the mix to help keep the kernels from bouncing around as much. Just keep pulsing the blender until the wheat kernels are the ...


1

I doubt that the wheat was too hard for your LHBS' mill (which is likely motorized and has heavy stainless steel rollers). The issue is that the gap is too big, and the knurled rollers have nothing to grab onto. So the wheat falls between the rollers without being crushed. Reknowned homebrewer and beer historian Randy Mosher states, "generally roller mills ...


1

If you don't want speculative answers based on what might be other users real experiences, I suggest contacting the Barley Crusher people directly. So few homebrewers are being that specific about the torque in the way they use the mill that I think you'd have to cruise many forums to find the 1% of the brewing populace that has already done the homework ...


1

It might be their mill, or it might be that your system isn't capable of dealing with properly milled grain. What kind of efficiency were you getting from the other shop that milled your grain? If it was good, then I'd say the mill at the new shop may be set too fine. If you were getting low efficiency before, you might want to consider changing your ...


1

To really verify their crush, you'd need some kind of sizing screen. For a quick check, though, I'd just dump a cup of milled grain into a sandwich bag and shake it a bit. You should be able to see how much flour or really fine particles are in there. If you've got a lot of small stuff, then their mill is too tightly gapped. Doesn't sound like they're ...


1

A grain mill that is appropriate for crushing barley for a mash is typically referred to as a grist mill. The mill needs to be set 'open' enough that the husk of the barley seed will crack open, but will not be torn apart. This is due to the need to use the husks as the filtration media during the sparge. A typical grist mill can be opened to a gap of at ...



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