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8

Alcohol is the product of anaerobic respiration, the consumption of sugars by yeast. If you had access to a chemistry lab, you could measure the alcohol directly, but most calculate their alcohol by calculating the quantity of sugar that has been consumed. For the most part, this is done by comparing the OG to the FG. In other words, the OG by itself will ...


8

The product you are looking for is called Armour Etch. Everything you need to know can be found here: http://www.capandhare.com/forums/showthread.php?t=726 Dead simple and produces very nice results.


7

It refers to American gallons. 5 gal.=18.92L


6

Craft stores sell creams for glass etching. That will give you permanent markings. Maybe not a lot of contrast but should still be visible.


5

For something north of electrical tape and south of glass-etching, I've used nail polish. Cheap and easy; even comes with it's own little brush. It won't come off in most circumstances, but it will if you take some acetone to it.


4

The problem with using anything that etches is that you're removing material from the unit. This can in turn affect the structural integrity in the long run. This is somewhat counter to why people prefer glass fermenters; they will resist scratching better than plastic. Etching is essentially controlled scratching. A few years ago I took a bumper sticker ...


4

I use both because my refractometer reads Brix (plato), but I "grew up" on SG and I often take my FG with a hydrometer, so I'm used to SG. There is also a good rule of thumb for determining alcohol content with SG. Drop the 1 and move the decimal place to the second to last place and that will approximate ABV. In other words, if you brew a 1.067 beer and get ...


3

I don't know of any homebrewers that are actually measuring the ppm of O2 dissolved in their wort. The best practice is to get an O2 cylinder with a medical grade flow meter (not a pressure regulator, but a flow meter). Then experiment with time on the meter and good results in the final product.


3

There's a relatively inexpensive procedure, known as the Winkler method, that's used by ecologists to measure the oxygen concentration in streams and ponds. It relies on titration using sodium thiosulfate (among other chemicals). I don't think this test works on wort, however, due to wort chemistry. At the very least, titration would be difficult with any ...


3

I'm also researching the same thing, looking for traits in the wort that indicate how fermentation is progressing and when it's complete. I don't have any figures, but I would be surprised if the electrical conductivity changes much during fermentation. Conductivity is mainly a result of ions in the wort, which come from the water, brewing salts we add to ...


3

May seem a little strange, but taking a sample to your local crime lab and having them run LC/MS on it can get the profile numbers, then make a donation to the police fund or offer the analyst some homebrew :-). I used to do similar analytical analysis as a university professor and the MS databases knock these out pretty quickly. Or go to a local ...


2

Heres a good bit of information from the mad fermentationist about alcohol content and fruit in beer: http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2010/10/adding-fruit-to-beer-increases-alcohol.html Fruit also contains other things (water) that will further dilute the beer, so the effect will be minimal, if anything at all, and can actually cause the total alcohol ...


2

My best guess is that the scale that goes to 26 is degrees Brix, and that one marked in % is potential alcohol. You can test the first guess by making a solution of 10% table sugar. Add 10g of sugar to 90g of water and mix well. The Brix scale should read 10.


1

Morebeer has a simple table for common fruits, http://morebeer.com/articles/fruit_in_beer It is unlikely you will lower the alcohol content unless the addition is primarily water, not at all sweet, or your beer is extremely high alcohol to begin with.


1

In theory if you can accurately measure your density and weights its possible. But in most real world applications your two measures will be contaminated by protein, wort, alcohol and hop debris. That will make an accurate measurment impossible, albeit a scientifically sound assumption. Yeast also aren't always the same size they swell and shrink a bit as ...


1

If you can get a particularly clean sample that is just wort or water and naturally compacted yeast then this should work, at least if calibrated initially against a cell count. The trouble is that most slurries from previous ferments contain a fair amount of trub, which can be difficult to account for. If you have a conical, then cropping from the ...


1

Have you tried Paint Markers yet? They're better suited to permanently marking glass, though for the best results, you usually have to bake it on. Enamels like nail polish can work well depending on the grade of it, and there are the Paint Stains that Martha Stewart puts out. DecoArt and Martha Stewart are the two brands I've used teh most, DecoArt being the ...


1

I'm impressed that permanent marker is being removed. I'm going to dip into art supply territory and suggest either screenprinting and/or pastel board adhesive. Screenprinting ink is available at any craft store, but you'll need to make a stencil or freehand the numbers. Pastel board adhesive is usually sold as an aerosol can -- it's used for coating ...


1

S.G. - Measure at least daily. This is important to monitor when you want to add DAP & Ferment-K in your nutrient schedule Measure until at least the 1/3 sugar break. pH - Many wine makers claim that the best time to adjust the pH is during the primary fermentation. The ideal pH is 3.7 but 3.5-3.9 works very well. I've had higher pH in some wines ...



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