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Don't start running finings through your mead to clear up finings. Patience is key here and fining and clarifying strategies tend to strip flavor. Try checking the pH. Both temperature and wine pH affect the fining process. The precipitation of the large, combined particles will be hastened at low temperatures and slowed at warmer temperatures. Thus, if at ...


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I have some still pomegranate cyser that I have been aging for 6 months. When it was in primary it had a murky red brown color to it. After the fermentation process is complete the suspended yeast should start to settle out and begin clearing the liquid leaving a red coloring. The long you let it age the clearer it will get. I don't ad tannin to mine, ...


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Honey shouldn't be heated above 140°F or the organic acid Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMS) is formed. The list of its negative effects is long, causing death in test animals, fatal to bees, and other negative effects in fermentation. Many dark beers that have Maillard malt notes like a dopplebock have elevated levels of HMS too. This acid may be why the mead ...


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If I had to guess I'd say what happened is that when you made it with bakers yeast you did not completely ferment the honey. If I remember correctly, bread yeast only ferments to ~5% abv and port yeast will ferment to closer to 20-25% abv. This would have dried your wine out completely. This is just an educated guess based on what you describe but if it ...


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ABV is Alcohol By Volume. Carbonation does not change the volume. So it would not effect the ABV. c02 is dissolved into the liquid. Meaning that the c02 molecules fit in between the liquid molecules and do not change the total volume of the liquid. As long as the c02 is trapped the liquid volume is unchanged, once released (bubbles) the gas displaces liquid ...


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I have tested this personally and have not been able to record any perceivable differences in SG readings. Sometimes degassing will invigorate a slow ferment but nothing more than a good stir would. I do see your math behind the ABV increase and I still believe that to be true as well. Degassing is something you should be doing throughout primary and into ...


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Previous answer was a bit overwhelming. Here's the skinny with a simple remedy for if this happens again. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the rotten egg odor you smell, and it usually forms at the end of fermentation. Most home winemakers won’t notice a smelly problem until the first racking. If you do smell rotten eggs, the quicker you can act, the better your ...



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