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4

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


4

An infection will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. To be sure ...


3

Without knowing your recipe, I would say leave it alone. Probably just a matter of some particulates in the must weighing more than others. I think two things will happen: (1) the yeast will probably stir things up and (2) as it ferments the liquid will clear anyway and particulates will settle at the bottom of the vessel. In my view, the risk of ...


3

From my experience, unless you are trying to stop/stun an active fermentation, you should not rack until your primary fermentation is either done or mostly done. If you racked too early, then there may not be enough yeast left to finish cleanly in a reasonable time, which could lead to yeast stress, a stalled ferment, or a very sluggish finish. You'll need a ...


3

That sparkle is carbon dioxide (CO2), one of yeast's main fermentation byproducts. It occurs in all fermentations (beer, wine, mead etc.) and residual amounts will linger in the beverage for many months after fermentation is done. Beer and champagne makers go to lengths to create and capture CO2 in solution for its characteristic sparkle, while wine makers ...


3

When to add fruit is somewhat subjective and debated, but the general principle is that the later you add, the more fresh-tasting and distinct the fruit character will be. If you want a more sherry-like "aged" fruit character then I would say add early. Personally I prefer the fresh flavor and aroma so I add macerated fruit to secondary. Another ...


2

Most of the folks that I know who make mead add the fruit into the primary (a lot of the sugars will ferment in primary). You can taste it when you rack it over to your first secondary and add more fruit as you want.


2

This is a great debate! While i personally lean on the side of calling distilled mead a honey brandy, i would agree with most people that commented so far. There isn't a clear category in which to fit a honey-sourced distilled alcohol. The average person is likely to view mead as a honey-based wine. But, this is not technically correct since a wine is ...


2

So, first things first, 1.130 is a pretty high starting gravity for some yeasts, and can cause some additional yeast stress, unless you are diligent with nutrients and your yeast is hearty enough to handle it. I'm not saying that this is necessarily a problem for D47, but its something to consider. The more work you expect the yeast to do, the more help you ...


2

I have used White Labs WLP001 California Ale Yeast for a hydromel before with some success. Since it has a fairly neutral flavor and is listed on White Labs' site as being good for honey ales, I figured it would do well with mead. It's also available at most homebrew shops. It may have a higher nutrient requirement, though, since it's intended for beer. As ...


2

I just had a look at the BJCP Mead Guidelines and they mention a Hydromel with has a starting ABV of 3.5% ABV. From a quick glance it appears that you can make most of the styles in this "light" version. I am sure that you can make great meads with low ABVs. Check the GotMead site/forums. I am sure there is more info there.


2

There is a common factoid that oranges are usually sprayed with fungicides for transport. If you do not wash them enough, some of it may end up in your mead and kill your yeast. My friend, who happens to be catering technician, always washes them for good few minutes using brush, if she wants to use zest for anything. Even longer before we put it in my beer. ...


2

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


2

The preferred way to determine how much to add is by measuring a very small amount (a few milliliters to start) into a small sample of beer. It would be helpful to have a pipette or eye dropper to do this. Peppers can vary widely in capsaicin content, to you really want to be careful with them. Aromatic flavors will extract in alcohol, as they tend to be ...


2

I believe the answer lies in your question. Pomagranate itself gives a red juice color. Honey is yellowish, it can be light or dark. Grape tannin (the powder) is light brown. Add Red + Yellow + Brown, and you get a red brownish mead. To get a better color, I suggest adding some grapes that have a deep red color, like Alicante Bouschet, to your recipe. ...


1

Once fermentation starts, convection currents will ensure that the puree and water are well mixed. There was probably no need for Campden, since all the ingredients were sterile. As it stands, you've got around 300ppm of sulphur in the must, which will likely impede fermentation. Leave it under an airlock for three or four days. If fermentation has not ...


1

If you picked up vinyl smell from fresh tubing it won't leave the mead. It may fade in time, but along with some of the other good smells in the mead too, because it will take a long time. And in a closed container that aroma isn't going anywhere.


1

Lower temp will give a cleaner flavour with fewer yeast generated esters. If you are up at 27C then you may get banana/clove flavours, which can be awesome if that is what you want. For a clean crisp mead that doesn't hide the character of the honey used I would suggest ~17C. It will take a few days longer to fully ferment all of the sugars at a lower ...


1

Yes, it should make a drinkable mead. A drill is used in winemaking to degass in a carboy, but for a 2L bottle it might not be appropriate. So if you really want a still mead with no gas, you can shake your bottle lightly and twist the cap slowly until you hear some gas coming out. Do not open it completely, as it may overflow. Repeat a few times until ...


1

To safely bottle the mead, use a plastic soda bottle. These bottles seem to be very strong: I know you can play american-style football with one for a couple hours without a problem, until you open it. Then the soda will shoot out quite far. So you risk losing your mead it if becomes too pressurized. On the positive side, you can squeeze the bottle with your ...


1

Try getting the must pH to greater than 5,aim for around 5.4. Then add some extra yeast. Only do this if your addition of CaCO3 was not successfully fixed the pH.


1

1) Dry mead usually turns out like a light dry wine with the floral hints of the honey coming through. 2) In my experience yes. 3) split the batch and see. 4) split the batch and see. 5) I usually do it just before bottling. But ensure I make sure to use a strong bottle in case some yeast slid past and turns it into sparkling mead. 6) Definitely split ...


1

If I had a beer dropping 0.002 per day, I wouldn't call it stuck, I'd call it "nowhere near ready to bottle". I don't make much mead, but I have had mead go about that slow and still finish dry. But it did take a while. Try adding more nutrients, that seems to be a standard procedure. And I think stirring up the yeast is an acceptable practice too.


1

That is from BJCG, Instructions to Mead Guidelines about carbonation That is from BJCP STYLE GUIDELINES 2008 edition A mead may be still, petillant, or sparkling. Still meads do not have to be totally flat; they can have some very light bubbles. Petillant meads are “lightly sparkling” and can have a moderate, noticeable amount of carbonation. ...


1

There is always some CO2 in a fermenting liquid. Unless you have had recent changes in temperature or pressure, the amount of CO2 will be right at the saturation point, so that a little agitation will cause bubbles to appear.


1

Well if we were going to vote on it mine would be Midus. It has been said a few times here and I think it's the most appropriate. It stands on it's own and doesn't need brandy, whisky, jack, or anything else acting as a crutch. Also it usually has that nice golden color so it makes a nice parallel with King Midus from Greek mythology that turned everything ...


1

It is normal for the air lock to slow way down after a couple days. It may bubble only once every few minutes. (And a watched pot never boils!) However, you may also have a bad seal. You can use the soapy water trick - mix a drop of dish soap in a glass of water. Then dab the water around the edge of seal and look for bubbles.


1

When making beer, wine, or mead, there is nothing that you can't not sanitize. It takes all of 5-10 minutes to stir up a batch of One-Step or Star San and sanitize your equipment, and it pretty greatly reduces your chances of contamination (assuming proper handling of the equipment). While the alcohol content should kill bacteria, sanitizer will.



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