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6

No it wont. In fact it can break up yeast floculation and aid fermentation. There is risk of oxidation if much alcohol has been produced when it was shook. But the c02 in headspace should minimize it. I once fermented a 5 gal 1.086 apple wine to 0.992 in a couple days on a stirpate to completely deny the yeast floculation.


3

I believe the answer lies in your question. Pomagranate itself gives a red juice color. Honey is yellowish, it can be light or dark. Grape tannin (the powder) is light brown. Add Red + Yellow + Brown, and you get a red brownish mead. To get a better color, I suggest adding some grapes that have a deep red color, like Alicante Bouschet, to your recipe. ...


3

I have tested this personally and have not been able to record any perceivable differences in SG readings. Sometimes degassing will invigorate a slow ferment but nothing more than a good stir would. I do see your math behind the ABV increase and I still believe that to be true as well. Degassing is something you should be doing throughout primary and into ...


3

I got a little carried away here, so here's a quick summary. TL;DR: Your yeast was probably either A) nutrient starved, B) Fermenting at too high of a temperature, or C) a combination of both. Regardless of your temperature control situation, I think A (nutrition) is the most likely cuplrit here. While it's true that some yeast strains are more prone to ...


3

Without knowing your recipe, I would say leave it alone. Probably just a matter of some particulates in the must weighing more than others. I think two things will happen: (1) the yeast will probably stir things up and (2) as it ferments the liquid will clear anyway and particulates will settle at the bottom of the vessel. In my view, the risk of ...


3

I have used White Labs WLP001 California Ale Yeast for a hydromel before with some success. Since it has a fairly neutral flavor and is listed on White Labs' site as being good for honey ales, I figured it would do well with mead. It's also available at most homebrew shops. It may have a higher nutrient requirement, though, since it's intended for beer. As ...


3

From my experience, unless you are trying to stop/stun an active fermentation, you should not rack until your primary fermentation is either done or mostly done. If you racked too early, then there may not be enough yeast left to finish cleanly in a reasonable time, which could lead to yeast stress, a stalled ferment, or a very sluggish finish. You'll need a ...


3

This is a great debate! While i personally lean on the side of calling distilled mead a honey brandy, i would agree with most people that commented so far. There isn't a clear category in which to fit a honey-sourced distilled alcohol. The average person is likely to view mead as a honey-based wine. But, this is not technically correct since a wine is ...


2

Don't start running finings through your mead to clear up finings. Patience is key here and fining and clarifying strategies tend to strip flavor. Try checking the pH. Both temperature and wine pH affect the fining process. The precipitation of the large, combined particles will be hastened at low temperatures and slowed at warmer temperatures. Thus, if at ...


2

I just had a look at the BJCP Mead Guidelines and they mention a Hydromel with has a starting ABV of 3.5% ABV. From a quick glance it appears that you can make most of the styles in this "light" version. I am sure that you can make great meads with low ABVs. Check the GotMead site/forums. I am sure there is more info there.


2

There is a common factoid that oranges are usually sprayed with fungicides for transport. If you do not wash them enough, some of it may end up in your mead and kill your yeast. My friend, who happens to be catering technician, always washes them for good few minutes using brush, if she wants to use zest for anything. Even longer before we put it in my beer.


2

"At 10 °C and 5.6 atm, a cooled champagne bottle (V = 0.75 L) would contain ca. 9.5 g of dissolved carbon dioxide (Table 2) [3]. Once the bottle is opened the CO2 pressure falls to at most 1 atm. Solubility considerations dictate that at 10 °C no more than 1.7 g will remain dissolved, so roughly 8 g of CO2 must suddenly be set free. This quantity of CO2 ...


2

Some yeast strains give sulfur smell during fermentation. That's perfectly normal. If it's in the air, it's no longer in your brew! The fact you can smell it so strongly indicates it is, literally, going away now. It comes from metabolism of sulfur amino-acids. Sooner they are degenerated and sulfur is released, the less chance it'll get released in the ...


2

My answer will not be full, but there are some things I can tell: Splitting half a dollar worth yeast packet in five? Why?! Especially in double-difficult brew, as it is both pretty high gravity (has to be for 10% ABV), and it is mead (no nutrient found in wort) Nutrient. Why add it in parts? I always understood we want yeast to multiply over as short ...


2

We make a lot of meads and I think the majority of your process looks pretty good. (Including the staggered nutrient additions). You might want to consider using a blend of nutrients like DAP and Fermaid K. They both contribute different vital compounds. I suspect that the hop additions pre ferment didn't help you much. That yeast is not very hop ...


1

Grats on your first brew! This has been well answered on process corrections. The harsh bitter is from the hop tea, if the cascade was 6.6%AA 60min boil you have about 45 IBUs there which is the top end of pale ales and the start to some IPAs. With no malt to balance, it can taste much more bitter. At your fermentation temp you can expect some fusel ...


1

I am going to repeat a lot of what Molot has already said but will add a few extra points: start with healthy yeast, if possible make a starter at least 24 hours in advance. Use a whole packet at once, maybe use 2 packs. make sure you have cleaned off all bleach, any left will ruin your brew add all your nutrients at the start when the yeast need them ...


1

If I had to guess I'd say what happened is that when you made it with bakers yeast you did not completely ferment the honey. If I remember correctly, bread yeast only ferments to ~5% abv and port yeast will ferment to closer to 20-25% abv. This would have dried your wine out completely. This is just an educated guess based on what you describe but if it ...


1

ABV is Alcohol By Volume. Carbonation does not change the volume. So it would not effect the ABV. c02 is dissolved into the liquid. Meaning that the c02 molecules fit in between the liquid molecules and do not change the total volume of the liquid. As long as the c02 is trapped the liquid volume is unchanged, once released (bubbles) the gas displaces liquid ...


1

Once fermentation starts, convection currents will ensure that the puree and water are well mixed. There was probably no need for Campden, since all the ingredients were sterile. As it stands, you've got around 300ppm of sulphur in the must, which will likely impede fermentation. Leave it under an airlock for three or four days. If fermentation has not ...


1

That taste you are refering to is most likely fusel alcohol being produced as a byproduct of fermentation. Various sources of yeast stress can cause fusel production during fermentation, but excessive must heat is by far the most common cause. Especially if your must temp is at or above 72F. I'd recommend trying a high heat tolerant yeast strain like EC ...


1

The answer to your question is really dependent on which stage of the fermentation your mead was in. If it was shaken during the aerobic phase... perfect. The yeast require oxygen to divide cells and prepare for active fermentation. If the shaking occurred during the rapid/active ferment then you are still OK as shaking here won't destroy any yeast nor will ...


1

If you picked up vinyl smell from fresh tubing it won't leave the mead. It may fade in time, but along with some of the other good smells in the mead too, because it will take a long time. And in a closed container that aroma isn't going anywhere.


1

Lower temp will give a cleaner flavour with fewer yeast generated esters. If you are up at 27C then you may get banana/clove flavours, which can be awesome if that is what you want. For a clean crisp mead that doesn't hide the character of the honey used I would suggest ~17C. It will take a few days longer to fully ferment all of the sugars at a lower ...


1

Yes, it should make a drinkable mead. A drill is used in winemaking to degass in a carboy, but for a 2L bottle it might not be appropriate. So if you really want a still mead with no gas, you can shake your bottle lightly and twist the cap slowly until you hear some gas coming out. Do not open it completely, as it may overflow. Repeat a few times until ...


1

To safely bottle the mead, use a plastic soda bottle. These bottles seem to be very strong: I know you can play american-style football with one for a couple hours without a problem, until you open it. Then the soda will shoot out quite far. So you risk losing your mead it if becomes too pressurized. On the positive side, you can squeeze the bottle with your ...


1

Try getting the must pH to greater than 5,aim for around 5.4. Then add some extra yeast. Only do this if your addition of CaCO3 was not successfully fixed the pH.



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