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8

A while ago I visited a local meadery and chatted with the brewer (meader?). He was planning on making use of a local micro-distiller's equipment to produce a spirit from his mead. I asked him the name of the resulting product, and his answer was "distilled mead". Not the answer I was hoping for. I've never tasted such a thing and suspect that the subtle ...


6

According to Wikipedia there doesn't appear to be much in the way of a family name for it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mead I think the closest would be "Midus" Midus: Lithuanian for mead, made of natural bee honey and berry juice. Infused with carnation blossoms, acorns, poplar buds, juniper berries and other herbs, it is often made as a mead distillate ...


5

Assuming that all of the proceeding is accurate, would it not just be a "honey brandy"? I can imagine a very sweet flavor with an interesting aroma and probably fairly drinkable if not pleasant flavor. I know that mead was popular in Egypt, Turkey, etc. since the dawn of civilization and you can't be the first person in human history to think of this so I ...


3

People will tell you that bugs won't grow in raw honey, and they're right. The bad news is that they're still there and they'll grow just fine when you add water to make the must. (Let's remember people, there are bee parts in this stuff...) If you pitch well with a very large yeast population, it is possible to have a fine ferment and a fine mead because ...


3

After I made my still, I was anxious to get started distilling. I had a five gallon carboy of strawberry mead that was made to about 15% ABV and was less than a year old,so I used that. It was wonderful right off the still, with flavors from both the strawberries and the honey. I double distilled, using a stripping run and a spirit run. It was good clear, ...


2

I was going to point out that organisms that produce endospores, like Clostridium botulinum survive in honey, but then I remembered that you can not kill them by boiling. The spores could also be naturally present in anything you brew or preserve. This is why you should use a pressure cooker for canning non-acidic foods. I did a bit more research, and found ...


2

Sandor Katz, author of several books on fermentation (mostly food items) has info on his website http://www.wildfermentation.com/, just search for "mead". His book "The art of Fermentation" also covers a selection of alcoholic drinks. The book is quite a good resource, keeping an eye on the bigger picture of fermentation, which may help you with equipment ...


2

Probably there's no infection. Even though the airlock was mostly dry, there shouldn't have been a way for rhe flies to get into the carboy. The liquid in the airlock evaporates over time, and vodka will evaporate faster that water. You should check the airlock every few weeks and top up (without removing from the carboy) when required. Fruit flies carry ...


2

I can't answer for certain since I can't test and sample it, but I can tell you of my own experiences with mead going off: I've had mead go off that looked fine, smelled only a little bit odd, and was so awful tasting that a couple of drops on the tip of the tongue triggered an involuntary gag reflex. My girlfriend once had mead that went off and there ...


2

Enzymes are catalysts and are not used up in the process of converting the substrate, that much is true. However, enzymes are not being introduced into a stable environment when being put into your melomel. Think about it, there is alcohol, the pH is very low, there is nothing to stabilize the enzymes, etc. Most likely the enzymes added in the beginning are ...


2

Wikipedia says, As with all catalysts, enzymes are not consumed by the reactions they catalyze [...] In other words, once you've added the enzyme, it will still be around to break down more fruit later (assuming you've not boiled the enzyme, which denatures it, but of course that's not the case here.) So, you shouldn't need to add more to ...


1

It's roughly 1 pound of honey to 1% abv in 5 gallons, 15lb will get you around 14% and 18lb about 17%. If looked after, WLP099 will consume all the sugars you have available at leave you with a very dry mead. 15% is no problem for that strain, and 18% is achievable with care. The sweet mead yeast WLP720 will stop around 14-15%, although actual performance ...


1

It's difficult to remove acidity from wine without affecting the flavour. You can add salts (calcium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate) to remove some acidity but this is considered a "last resort" solution. This PDF claims that honey contains malic acid, though it doesn't give a breakdown. It does, however, indicate that gluconic acid is the primary organic ...


1

I believe the main reason for topping off wine is to reduce headspace. This is only necessary after initial fermentation, when the CO2 produced wards off Oxygen. Wine is very susceptible to oxidation. However, if you have the wine in a carboy already, use instinct to think about how much you will disturb the wine by topping off. I think people normally top ...


1

On the safe side I have always ensured that I remove the fruit after around a week. If its a fruit that I want to ensure I get a lot of flavor out of I would make sure its chopped up and mashed. If its a really easy fruit to go bad I would suggest added Campden tablets to the must, this will lower the risk of it turning bad. You could always try removing ...


1

I grew up making beer, hard cider(a type of wine), applejack(concentrated hard cider through freezing) and wine at home. My father's friends made corn whiskey and gin. I have done hours of internet searches about various alcohols and have come to these conclusions. Whiskey is distilled from beer(Beer is from fermented grains). Brandy is distilled from ...


1

When I have distilled mead, I have called it "Mead Moonshine" when un-oaked and either "Mead Whiskey" or "Mead Brandy" when oaked. Although the name "Mead whiskey" is not very accurate, the product tastes more like whiskey than brandy to me. If you were to make mead with some fruit (pears, strawberry's, oranges etc) I would go with "Mead(& ...


1

One thing I have begun to experiment with is a double fermentation of my apple cider into a more potent agave fermented cider-wine. I start off with the the traditional cider making of my apple cider. Then when it has stopped fermenting I add more sugar (agave) and the fermenting continues. This increases the alcohol percentage from 7%the to anywhere up to ...



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