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4

I have my own family recipe that I have recently cooked off made from clover honey. We have always called it honeydew whiskey even though it does not meet description standards of whiskey. Its what I have heard several old timers call it


3

I once heard a name for this called "drakas"(spelling). As told it was a Norse drink made by placing a bowl of honey mead outside overnight. In the morning, chip off the ice and repeat a few times untill a thick drink was the result.


2

When I have distilled mead, I have called it "Mead Moonshine" when un-oaked and either "Mead Whiskey" or "Mead Brandy" when oaked. Although the name "Mead whiskey" is not very accurate, the product tastes more like whiskey than brandy to me. If you were to make mead with some fruit (pears, strawberry's, oranges etc) I would go with "Mead(& ...


2

I grew up making beer, hard cider(a type of wine), applejack(concentrated hard cider through freezing) and wine at home. My father's friends made corn whiskey and gin. I have done hours of internet searches about various alcohols and have come to these conclusions. Whiskey is distilled from beer(Beer is from fermented grains). Brandy is distilled from ...


1

I would like to argue that distilled mead is not a brandy product as brandy is distilled wine and i believe the distinction for wine is a fermentation from fruit or berries. Honey is a sugar product and its my opinion that it should therefore be considered a Rum.


1

Aguardente de mel is what we call it in portuguese... Literal translation to english is Honey's burning water


1

One thing I have begun to experiment with is a double fermentation of my apple cider into a more potent agave fermented cider-wine. I start off with the the traditional cider making of my apple cider. Then when it has stopped fermenting I add more sugar (agave) and the fermenting continues. This increases the alcohol percentage from 7%the to anywhere up to ...


1

71B is another very popular choice. I tend to use that or D47 for most of my meads, but there are a ton of options -- essentially any wine yeast will work, as will most ale yeasts (although they don't have the same alcohol tolerance and can introduce more obvious fermentation character to the mead). Never tried a lager yeast... No matter what yeast you use, ...


1

If it tastes good to you, don't change it. If you do want to experiment, there are yeasts recommended for mead. EC-1118 and D-47 are dry yeasts that are commonly recommended. EC-1118 will ferment rather dry with a higher ABV. D-47 will leave slightly more residual sugar and a lower ABV than EC-1118. Both should produce more alcohol than US-05. WLP720 ...


1

It sounds like the extra sugar content from the fruit led to a faster fermentation. Small changes in OG can have large effects on the fermentation, particularly if the temperature isn't controlled -- the faster fermentation leads to higher temperatures, leading to even faster fermentation, etc. Additionally, it's possible that the pectin from the fruit made ...


1

I don't think you'll have ruined the batch just by using so much yeast to start. The yeast simply wouldn't have needed to reproduce as much as they normally do so the fermentation would have started faster and subsequently finished faster. When you say everything has settled to the bottom are you referring to fruit and spices you added for flavour? or just ...


1

There is some risk of infection by beer-dwelling organisms, especially souring bacteria. Sanitation is less critical after primary, but if you want to be certain, clean utensils with something food-safe like Star San.


1

I always wash my test equipment like I wash any other kitchen utensils.


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It's roughly 1 pound of honey to 1% abv in 5 gallons, 15lb will get you around 14% and 18lb about 17%. If looked after, WLP099 will consume all the sugars you have available at leave you with a very dry mead. 15% is no problem for that strain, and 18% is achievable with care. The sweet mead yeast WLP720 will stop around 14-15%, although actual performance ...


1

You could try adding some pectolase, mix it up and see if that fixes it. If that doesn't would I would try adding some stronger finings such as the Youngs 2 part sachet. These have never failed me. Failing all of that I suppose the last resort would be to use a wine filter.


1

It's difficult to remove acidity from wine without affecting the flavour. You can add salts (calcium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate) to remove some acidity but this is considered a "last resort" solution. This PDF claims that honey contains malic acid, though it doesn't give a breakdown. It does, however, indicate that gluconic acid is the primary organic ...


1

I believe the main reason for topping off wine is to reduce headspace. This is only necessary after initial fermentation, when the CO2 produced wards off Oxygen. Wine is very susceptible to oxidation. However, if you have the wine in a carboy already, use instinct to think about how much you will disturb the wine by topping off. I think people normally top ...


1

On the safe side I have always ensured that I remove the fruit after around a week. If its a fruit that I want to ensure I get a lot of flavor out of I would make sure its chopped up and mashed. If its a really easy fruit to go bad I would suggest added Campden tablets to the must, this will lower the risk of it turning bad. You could always try removing ...



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