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4

An infection will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. To be sure ...


3

That sparkle is carbon dioxide (CO2), one of yeast's main fermentation byproducts. It occurs in all fermentations (beer, wine, mead etc.) and residual amounts will linger in the beverage for many months after fermentation is done. Beer and champagne makers go to lengths to create and capture CO2 in solution for its characteristic sparkle, while wine makers ...


2

When to add fruit is somewhat subjective and debated, but the general principle is that the later you add, the more fresh-tasting and distinct the fruit character will be. If you want a more sherry-like "aged" fruit character then I would say add early. Personally I prefer the fresh flavor and aroma so I add macerated fruit to secondary. Another ...


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Most of the folks that I know who make mead add the fruit into the primary (a lot of the sugars will ferment in primary). You can taste it when you rack it over to your first secondary and add more fruit as you want.


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There is some risk of infection by beer-dwelling organisms, especially souring bacteria. Sanitation is less critical after primary, but if you want to be certain, clean utensils with something food-safe like Star San.


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That is from BJCG, Instructions to Mead Guidelines about carbonation That is from BJCP STYLE GUIDELINES 2008 edition A mead may be still, petillant, or sparkling. Still meads do not have to be totally flat; they can have some very light bubbles. Petillant meads are “lightly sparkling” and can have a moderate, noticeable amount of carbonation. ...


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There is always some CO2 in a fermenting liquid. Unless you have had recent changes in temperature or pressure, the amount of CO2 will be right at the saturation point, so that a little agitation will cause bubbles to appear.


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I always wash my test equipment like I wash any other kitchen utensils.


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It's roughly 1 pound of honey to 1% abv in 5 gallons, 15lb will get you around 14% and 18lb about 17%. If looked after, WLP099 will consume all the sugars you have available at leave you with a very dry mead. 15% is no problem for that strain, and 18% is achievable with care. The sweet mead yeast WLP720 will stop around 14-15%, although actual performance ...


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There is nothing new. Distilled mead is called "mead balsam", at least in Lithuania, where "midus" (mead) was an ancient drink, later one factory tried to distill it. Please google for such drinks as "Suktinis" or "Zalgiris" (which is 75% strong)...Also see midus.lt In my personal opinion, mead (real matured mead, and the best mead shall be matured at least ...


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Just to contribute, we´re making distilled spirits from mead here in Brasil and we´re calling it something like "Pot Still Mead" or Hidromel de Alambique in Portuguese. Another consideration is directed to @J Shane Jacobs: the spirit from distilling molasses is rum. But the spirit from fresh sugar cane wine is called Cachaça (if produced in Brasil) and Rum ...


1

So I have a little different take on this. Just informational because I think it is so interesting how names emerge. My grandfather gave me most of the terminology that I use in the fermenting and distillation of things. He called once distilled hard cider and frozen concentrated hard cider by the same name-- applejack. Once it was put through the second ...


1

Did you add any yeast nutrients or raisins to the must? Honey and water sound like a feast for your yeast, but it is really like trying to eat three square meals at an ice-cream parlor. There is no real nutrition available. The normal practice with meads is to fortify the must with some packaged yeast-nutrient. The ancient practice is to throw a few ...


1

It is normal for the air lock to slow way down after a couple days. It may bubble only once every few minutes. (And a watched pot never boils!) However, you may also have a bad seal. You can use the soapy water trick - mix a drop of dish soap in a glass of water. Then dab the water around the edge of seal and look for bubbles.


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71B is another very popular choice. I tend to use that or D47 for most of my meads, but there are a ton of options -- essentially any wine yeast will work, as will most ale yeasts (although they don't have the same alcohol tolerance and can introduce more obvious fermentation character to the mead). Never tried a lager yeast... No matter what yeast you use, ...


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If it tastes good to you, don't change it. If you do want to experiment, there are yeasts recommended for mead. EC-1118 and D-47 are dry yeasts that are commonly recommended. EC-1118 will ferment rather dry with a higher ABV. D-47 will leave slightly more residual sugar and a lower ABV than EC-1118. Both should produce more alcohol than US-05. WLP720 ...


1

It sounds like the extra sugar content from the fruit led to a faster fermentation. Small changes in OG can have large effects on the fermentation, particularly if the temperature isn't controlled -- the faster fermentation leads to higher temperatures, leading to even faster fermentation, etc. Additionally, it's possible that the pectin from the fruit made ...


1

I don't think you'll have ruined the batch just by using so much yeast to start. The yeast simply wouldn't have needed to reproduce as much as they normally do so the fermentation would have started faster and subsequently finished faster. When you say everything has settled to the bottom are you referring to fruit and spices you added for flavour? or just ...


1

When making beer, wine, or mead, there is nothing that you can't not sanitize. It takes all of 5-10 minutes to stir up a batch of One-Step or Star San and sanitize your equipment, and it pretty greatly reduces your chances of contamination (assuming proper handling of the equipment). While the alcohol content should kill bacteria, sanitizer will.


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I have been making wine for many years and recently beer. I always sanitize anything that may come in contact with the wine or beer at any point in the process. Contamination is something cannot be undone, you are better safe than sorry.



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