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4

Well, you should be able to completely ferment it within 3 weeks with proper yeast health and management. Belgian Blonde is not that complex of a beer that it should take months. I'd ferment and bottle. Then you can try the beers a bottles incrementally until you think its perfect and really start drinking them. Seeing how you are going to be reusing some ...


3

Differences in scale, equipment and in the amount of yeast pitched are the main things I've found. Keep in mind that not everything about commercial brewing translates to homebrewing.


3

The presence of yeasty dust in the bottle and some carbonation leads me to believe you can expect these to carbonate normally. I have lagered beer at controlled temps for at least 5 months and gotten successful bottle conditioning. Issues holding yours back are likely the temp swings. Move the bottles to someplace closer to 70F and try and hold them ...


3

I think a typical Belgian Ale lower than 1.070 shouldn't take more than 3-5 months to really come together. Unless you add weird spices that need to settle down over time, or souring bacteria that need a few months to work, then you should be good to go with any "normal" Belgian style that clocks in lower than 1.070. So Blondes, Dubbels, Tripels ... all ...


2

I have used the Wine Experts kits (premium and ultra premium). They are drinkable in less than 12 months and are 4 gallon kits.


2

If the use of the term maturation comes after a period of "conditioning/carbonating" then I take it to mean just letting the beer get some age on it. Often there are some styles of beer that do well to just sit around for a period of time. I don't always think it means on the yeast, but in the case of a bottle conditioned beer there will be some yeast in ...


2

After 5 months of cold storage, there would but next to no viable yeast left in the beer. Store it for a couple more weeks, somewhere warm, and you may get lucky. If not, you'll want to remove the caps, add a couple grains of dry yeast to each bottle, and recap. Don't worry too much about oxygen, as the renewed fermentation should consume any oxygen that's ...


2

Maturation begins the moment fermentation completes, up until it is consumed, therefor no, it does not need to be carbonated. Since maturing the beer is another way of saying "aging the beer", the temperature will vary depending on the current stage it is at. For instance (assuming an ale yeast strain), once primary fermentation completes and maturing ...


2

Dry airlock - You may be ok, it's not an ideal scenerio, but the dry air lock alone may have been enough to protect the beer for a couple days. Cross fingers. Super bitter - check your recipe, double check hop addition times and amounts, type (pellet, whole). If the recipe doesn't call for aging, some over hopping may have happened. Time will most ...


1

Did you use pellets instead of leaves? If so, you need to adjust the amount downwards. My experience is that there is not a one to one relation between pellets and leaves. Erlo


1

I have Belgian pale ale on tap now that had an OG in the 1.055-60 range. Took about 3-4 weeks to ferment and it was on tap a couple weeks after that.


1

Aging in the carboy or demijohn or whatever is called bulk aging. Once it's bottled, it's called bottle aging. As you have noticed, it's different, and primarily results from the volume of the container. Large containers age slower than smaller ones, however you want to bulk age so it's all aging together before you divide it out into individual bottles. ...


1

One thought I have is it's due to incomplete fermentation. Cold crashing a beer after a week will not necessarily make the best beer. Try leaving it in primary for 3 weeks and see if it improves.


1

I think you're confusing two different things. the reason to raise the temp toward the end of fermentation is to make sure the yeast is active enough to finish the fermentation. That's commonly done with both ales and lagers. as an example, I ferment most ales around 63F, but after 5-7 days at that temp I raise it to make sure fermentation is done. after ...


1

Amateur and scientific interest in beermaking is increasing, but it is a much younger subject than that of winemaking. I would direct you to research done on wine maturation for an answer to your question. Keep in mind though, that strong scientific research will likely be limited. Any huge breakthroughs discovered by a company's internal lab would probably ...


1

If you have a fridge, I'd condition it at serving temp. But if you are not kegging the beer after, you may need to add more yeast at bottling time if you cold crash it for too long. There may still be enough yeast in suspension when you go to bottle, but they'll be very sluggish after the cold crash. EDIT Re reading your post later, I think you'll be fine ...



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