Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Sometimes just blowing into your hose connected to the mash tun is enough to get the mash unstuck. (When brewing on a larger scale, you can inject it with compressed air.) Your next option, should that not fix things, would be to increase the temperature of the mash. Since most homebrewers mash in plastic coolers, directly adding heat often isn't an ...


7

There's a very good explanation of the whole detailed calculations here ...but the sum of that is basically this: For most purposes, a good ratio is to use 1.25 Qts. per pound of grain (0.3125 gal/lb.)3. So that would be about 2.6 L per 1 kg (thanks @Paolo for the correction) You will then sparge with enough water to get it to your desired volume, ...


6

Dry is the same as "not sweet". But high FG is not necessarily sweet. If the residual sugars are long-chain carbohydrates, they will contribute to body but not much to sweetness. So I'd say that low FG implies dry, but high FG does not necessarily imply sweet.


5

Some specialty grains (e.g. dextrin/cara-pils) need to be mashed. These need to be mashed, because they require a chemical reaction to take place to be useful. Some (e.g. crystal) need only to be steeped, but can also be put in the mash. These do not need a chemical reaction to take place to be useful, they just need to have the chemicals in them extracted ...


4

Get to know your system Starting gravity is one measure that helps you produce consistent beers. Suppose you made this beer again with the same ingredients, using the same process. All other things being equal, you should hit the same OG. Ferment the two batches the same way and you reproduce the original beer. It is not necessarily an indicator that you ...


4

Alcohol in fermented beer skews the refractometer reading. You need to use a correction formula in order to get an accurate reading.


4

If you use corn meal, you'll need to do a cereal mash to gelatinize the starches before adding it to the mash. I tend to use instant grits or polenta so you can skip the cereal mash. At one of our club's Iron Brewer contests, I made breakfast cereal the secret ingredient. The contestants got cocoa puffs, Fruit Loops, a cinnamon wheat cereal, and Lucky ...


4

IMO, yes it's pointless. First, it's pretty much impossible to not get conversion given a sound recipe and hitting your mash temps. Second, as you've noticed, it's more than possible to get a false reading. I haven't done an iodine test in the last 13 years and haven't felt like I needed to do one.


4

There are a lot of factors that affect the amount of water used for mashing: batch size, evaporation rate, equipment loss, grain absorption, etc. You're best to start with the amount of beer you want to make and work backwards from there. There are plenty of online calculators that will do the math for you. If you don't know the values for some of the ...


4

If your pre-boil gravity is low you can goose it with some DME or whatever fermentable sugar you prefer. As to the issues with beersmith, its hard really to know without the recipe so when you have that throw it up and we can examine it more.


4

I just let it boil down for about 1 - 2 hours before I began my hop additions. [...] but what is the normal method for correcting an under-shot pre-boil gravity? Boiling for 1.5-2 hours is quite common. It sounds like the advice you got from Beersmith was correct. Your pre-boil volume is usually about 1.2-1.5 times your expected volume into the ...


4

The step mash procedure described above is really not necessary any more. With today's highly modified malts, almost any recipe can be made with a single infusion mash. The reason for this is that the maltster has in effect done the first step for you by making sure the malt is highly modified. The eliminates the need for a low temperature protein rest. ...


3

My understanding of "synonymous" is that it means "equivalent to". Therefore clearly no, "dry" is not equivalent to "low FG" which is not equivalent to "drinkable". However, they may well be related since low FG correlates with light body which can aid in drinkability. Similarly, if you like dry beer then you'll find it drinkable. And why exclude ...


3

In my own experience, "dry" and "low FG" are completely unrelated. This surprised me at first, but there are a lot of other factors besides FG that determine the 'dryness' of the beer. Right off the bat, the amount of hop bitterness counterbalances the sweetness. Likewise, any astringent character from the mineral qualities of the water will start chipping ...


3

The words may get frequently overloaded, but they actually all mean different things. I'll attempt to explain below. Dry(ness) -- Tends to refer to the amount of detectable sweetness in the final beverage. A beer that is hardly sweet would be considered dry. A dry beer could be correlated to Low FG, as little sugar would remain in the beer to taste. Low FG ...


3

Not meaning to be a wise guy, but that's kind of like asking "how long is a piece of string?". For one thing, adding carapils or malto dextrine might increase the body, but it won't necessarily mimic what happens at higher mash temps. Also, it's going to be highly subjective, depending on your tastes and exactly what you hope to accomplish. Finally, we're ...


3

There are 2 reasons to adjust your water...to get the proper pH and to add minerals necessary for yeast health and beer flavor. To do the former, you can simply measure the pH with a meter or papers, then empirically add salts until you achieve the desired pH. You don't pretreat the water because it's the mash pH you're concerned with, not the water pH. In ...


3

The mash temperature specifically doesn't really make for a sweeter beer. While adjusting mash temperature allows the brewer to control the balance of simple (fermentable) sugars and dextrins (unfermentable), increasing either doesn't produce a sweeter beer: increasing simple sugars doesn't make the beer sweeter - primarily any sweetness from these sugars ...


3

(Yes, it's semantics: the words have different meanings. :) Mashing is the enzymatic conversion of starch to sugar, using alpha- and beta-amylaze naturally present in grain at the specific temperatures to activate them (~150°F). Steeping is using hot water to extract flavor and color compounds from grain.


3

If you are slow to raise temp between steps, you are in effect spending more time in each enzyme's temp range. This could have an effect on the beer. For instance, if you do a rest at 120ish with a well modified malt (which you shouldn't do anyway!), spending longer in that low temp range can ruin the body and foam of the beer. If you're at a beta rest ...


3

Most of the heat is usually lost through the lid in coolers. Cooler lids are not well insulated. The bodies are. This is because they are meant to keep things cold not hot. Heat rises and a cooler lid isn't designed to actually handle it. Some coolers are better than others. I have used several and found wide differences. I found that if I covered the ...


2

In one of the Basic Brewing Radio podcasts I listened to recently, John Palmer mentioned making an American lager with "corn meal right off the shelf" as an adjunct. If I were in a pinch, I'd rather use corn meal than a breakfast cereal, which has dozens of ingredients, including butylated hydroxytoluene. On the other hand, actually making applejack with ...


2

I use flaked maize (corn), flaked oats and flaked barley in a couple different recipes. I just put them right in the main mash mixed in with all the grain. I have even put them through the mill a couple different occasions by accident without ill effect. I do tend to add 0.25-0.5lb rice hulls when using flaked oats to help with the sparge. But if your ...


2

Unless you are making a specific recipe that uses a lot of flaked grain such as a wheat beer, the flaked portion of a recipe is usually a very small percentage of the grain bill and should be considered more of a specialty grain contributing flavour, colour, mouthfeel rather than a significant amount of fermentable sugars. Assuming you are doing a full mash ...


2

Most single temps mash go for 60 minutes. Convention for the minutes is how long something is boiled. SO a 60min hop addition is done once your boil starts. 5 minutes means with 5 minutes remaining. 0 means right as you turn off the heat before you start to chill. A 90 minute boil would include 30 minutes of boiling before the hop additions start. A 90 ...


2

I have experimented with this several times. IMO, you get nothing detectable from it. An all mash hopped beer that calculated to over 130 IBU measured only in the mid 20s. There was no detectable flavor or aroma from the mash hops.


2

The speed of the mash is mainly down to enzymatic activity, and this is influenced chiefly by temperature and then by pH. Naturally you don't want to change your temperature, so the next thing is to be sure your pH is within 5.1-5.5 pH. As well as enzymatic activity, there is the time it takes for the enzymes to leach out of the grains into the mash liquor. ...


2

The end result is the same, but mashing implies that enzymes are converting starches into sugars. These enzymes work when held around 150°F. The two enzymes are alpha and beta amylase. Alpha works more at higher temperatures (optimal at 158°F) and cuts starches randomly into long chain sugars (only some of which are fermentable). Beta works at lower ...


2

No, you won't, but you also may not need all those rests. That would make it easier for you.


2

Sounds normal to me. When I was first reading up about BIAB, it was mentioned in several places that this is an issue. Absorbing 3/4 of 5 gallons seems like a bit much, but it will absorb some (I've heard about a quart per pound?). It probably didn't absorb that much, as the wort would drain out of the bag if you could hold it over the pot for 10-20 minutes. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible