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I've been doing basically what you're doing for at least a year now. I'm not an award winning brewer by any means, but heating the water and grains together has worked just fine for me. Agreed on the 90 minute mash being unnecessary. 60 minute mashes are also not needed, and if you really want to save time look into doing iodine tests on your wort.


4

Assuming you shoot for a saccharification rest around 65°C, the mash is heating up between ~1.4 and 1.8°C per minute. You'd make it through the 45-55° glucanase/protease range in ~5-7 minutes. I can't see this having a real effect on the wort composition, and I can't think of any other reason this technique would really make a difference. I'd say you'll be ...


2

I have this exact same problem and it started showing up when I went to all grain. Some of the BSG kits I've done use a steeping grain process where the grains are pre-milled and they all turned out great. My extract brews have also been great. In every case I've used the same water source (tap water)... From the first all-grain batch to my latest they have ...


2

Hop bitterness is relatively stable, falling off over the course of many months. Hop flavor and aroma is more volatile, falling off dramatically over the course of weeks, then more so over the course of months. If you want bright, high hop flavor and aroma, look into "dry-hopping", where hops are added to the post-fermented beer. This is pretty much ...


1

Two things to note about using a hydrometer during the mash/boil: 1/ you should always make sure your hydrometer is calibrated to 1.000 in distilled water at whatever the calibration temperature of your hydrometer is (usually somewhere around 60°F/15°C). (You only need to do this once, it should never vary over time.) 2/ The temperature of the sample does ...



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