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0

I have done the same thing and my home brew man said put in a kumara. I have fermented my out and am hoping to try it in a few week see how bad it really is


5

If you are batch sparging the rate has minimal impact of efficiency. If you are fly sparging in most certainly can have an effect, slower is usually better. Finding the balance between a speedy enough brew session and decent efficiency is a personal choice. Shooting for 75% is probably fine and some report getting better beer without pushing into the 80+% ...


4

The whole "Brew in a Bag" methodology is based on using a very fine bag to filter the wort, just as you suggest. Its certainly feasible and something a lot of home brewers do (it doesn't scale up to pro-brewing sizes).


4

This is called "vorlauf" and yes, it is traditional. That being said, it's also a highly effective way of producing a clear sweet wort. I would guess that you'd need a fairly fine filter, not just a mesh strainer, to achieve the same level of clarity produced by recirculating a few quarts of wort. The filter would need to be so fine that you'd either need a ...


3

According the Brau Kaiser, it's acidic melanoidins. Melanoidins are composed of sugars and amino acids, and are created through the Maillard reaction.


0

I used a 10-gallon Home Depot cooler to build my mash tun, and I have no trouble with heat loss during a mash. The initial heat loss is due to the difference in temperature between the hot water and the cool grain and mash tun itself. After the temperature stabilizes (the cool parts have warmed up) the temperature should remain plenty stable. You have to ...


0

This cooler should not give you any significant loss for a "normal" mash at ambient temps (~70F). This is exactly the kind I use and I typically see 1 degree or less lost over 75 minutes. When I do an overnight mash (8-12 hours), it loses ~30 degrees. Make sure you use the correct strike temp; add your water, then grains to water slowly while stirring and ...


0

OK, so @DennyConn and @brewchez's advice is very good, but they don't directly answer your questions. So here it goes. I have found that the best thing to do is to keep a pot of boiling water and a pot of ice-cold water ready when I mash in. When I have adequately stirred my mash, I check the temp in 4-5 places, and go with the average. I add hot or cold ...



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