Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I have used a cooler for 466 batches over the last 17 years. I have tried using a pot to mash in and found I preferred the cooler because it held the temp so well. I seldom find a need to do step mashes and in fact question their value. But when I want to do one, it's a simple matter to simply infuse boiling water until I get to the temp step I'm going ...


2

Cooler as Mash Tun Pros: Relatively cheap and easy to modify with a bulkhead fitting and ball valve. Holds a steady temperature very well. Lighter weight, and therefore easier to clean. Cons: Cannot be direct-fired, so any step mashing has to be done with additional infusions or by decoction - step infusions will increase your mash's water-to-grist ratio. ...


0

I used a 10-gallon Home Depot cooler to build my mash tun, and I have no trouble with heat loss during a mash. The initial heat loss is due to the difference in temperature between the hot water and the cool grain and mash tun itself. After the temperature stabilizes (the cool parts have warmed up) the temperature should remain plenty stable. You have to ...


0

This cooler should not give you any significant loss for a "normal" mash at ambient temps (~70F). This is exactly the kind I use and I typically see 1 degree or less lost over 75 minutes. When I do an overnight mash (8-12 hours), it loses ~30 degrees. Make sure you use the correct strike temp; add your water, then grains to water slowly while stirring and ...


0

OK, so @DennyConn and @brewchez's advice is very good, but they don't directly answer your questions. So here it goes. I have found that the best thing to do is to keep a pot of boiling water and a pot of ice-cold water ready when I mash in. When I have adequately stirred my mash, I check the temp in 4-5 places, and go with the average. I add hot or cold ...



Top 50 recent answers are included