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6

I used strips for years before I got a meter. They can work well, but I recommend only using the colorPhast strips, which are pretty expensive. The cheaper ones just aren't accurate I've found. I now use pH meter. Don't get a cheapo meter...you'll just be wasting your money. Your pH should be 5.2-5.4 measured at room temp (around 70F). I use lactic or ...


5

If you haven't tossed the yeast cake from your Cider yet, you can make Skeeter Pee. You can also make it with a couple packets of Champagne yeast if you have tossed the cider yeast. You don't want to ferment straight lemon juice, it's way too acidic for yeast and way to acidic for you to drink a glass of, lemonade is heavily diluted with water and sweetened ...


3

I use either lactic or phosphoric acid to reduce pH. You can also use acid malt. I think the absolute best water calculator around is Bru'nwater (https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/). Its author, Martin Brungard, is a professional water engineer who has done work for many large breweries, including Sierra Nevada. It also has a great section on water ...


3

There's no way your mash was 3.8 unless you were using highly acidified water to begin with. But you can measure your water pH to be sure. Most water starts alkali and if anything you have to work to bring down the mash pH. The pH mostly affects enzyme activity, and so mash efficiency. There is some minor affect on body, but this is small compared to the ...


3

The commercial "hard lemonades" are made by fermenting a malt base. That's why it can be sold in grocery stores. If they used distilled alcohol it would be illegal in most states. Then the fermented malt beverage is filtered within an inch of its life to remove pretty much all flavor and everything but the alcohol. It is then flavored with artificial ...


3

There are 2 reasons to adjust your water...to get the proper pH and to add minerals necessary for yeast health and beer flavor. To do the former, you can simply measure the pH with a meter or papers, then empirically add salts until you achieve the desired pH. You don't pretreat the water because it's the mash pH you're concerned with, not the water pH. In ...


3

According the Brau Kaiser, it's acidic melanoidins. Melanoidins are composed of sugars and amino acids, and are created through the Maillard reaction.


2

Yes and no. Anything that absorbs a liquid that is not clear will also absorb the liquid's color, so yes. If you were to use a pH strip to absorb a wort solution that is high in the SRM scale, it will also absorb that wort's color as well. With that said, the amount of solution it is absorbing pales in comparison (hardy-har-har) to what you would pour in ...


2

Wow, this brew is really giving you trouble! The high FG is most likely a problem with the mash, that it was too warm, producing a lot of unfermentable sugars, or that conversion was not complete, resulting in a lot of starch and cloudiness. Both will give you a high finishing gravity. To try to fix this, you can add additional enzymes to break down the ...


2

Phosphoric acid itself is consumable, but to make it food safe, processing and packaging have to be done in a food safe manner. I use lactic acid 88% to acidify my mash and sparge water. Your LHBS probably carries this. Only a few milliliters are required, so a small plastic syringe or pipette is great for getting an appropriate dose. As well as using acid ...


2

Sima is a traditional Finnish drink that is basically hard lemonade... In a large non-reactive pot (stainless steel or ceramic coated, NOT aluminum), boil 3 liters (+ 1 cup to allow for evaporation, spillage ect.) of water with 2-3 cups white sugar, brown sugar, honey or any combo thereof (more sugar = more alcohol). When dissolved, add 2-4 thinly sliced ...


2

I would avoid pH 5.2 with high carbonate levels since the quantities needed leave a salty taste. Although the Brupaks page doesn't list the ingredients, it mentions that the CRS is an acid blend. This is a much better start than pH 5.2, which adds lots of sodium to your beer, which in excess gives a harsh saltiness. Managing the mash pH can be a pain, so a ...


1

Keep your water profile basically the same and add acid. You can use many online calculators, but I think its better to deal with it practically. Start your mash and measure pH, then slow add acid a ml or drop wise, remeasuring as you go. Keep track of how much you add, then you have a good starting point to begin with for the next mash. I'd also measure ...


1

pH should be measured and reported at room temp, about 70F. The idea that pHosphoric acid will negatively affect Ca is pretty much outdated and disproven. I doubt that your acid blend will have any negative affects, but it really depends on how much you used. For more info about water, pH, and how to adjust it, see https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/ ...


1

I'll take a stab at this since there are no answers yet. I also live in a high alkaline water area (although probably not as high as yours) and I regularly use 5.2 stabilizer to get my mash ph in the right area. It is simple to use (1 Tbl / 5 gal batch) and uses various buffers to bring the water ph either down or up to around 5.2, which is the general ph ...


1

I use pickling lime frequently to raise pH and it works really well. It's much more effective than either chalk or baking soda, which means you can use a lot less of it.


1

Sodium hydroxide is lye - caustic soda, and has the same disadvantage as baking soda - leaving behind sodium anions, as well as being a strong base, so careful handling is required. Calcium hydroxide - pickling lye - is better suited, it's also a strong base and is used much in the food industry. (I live in Norway, and here it's used to prepare a fish meal ...


1

If you did a forced fermentation and it went down to 1.030, then that's it...its over. You have a process problem and pH or other things aren't the solution.



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