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9

Even if jsolarski's hunch is incorrect (that your extra DME is for priming the bottles), and it was actually meant for the boil, the beer won't be ruined at all. You just missed the original gravity target, which means: the beer will finish drier than it otherwise would have (lower original gravity will usually lead to lower final gravity) the balance of ...


5

Do not do this! Speaking from experience. I accidentally put my auto siphon into a bucket that was full of near boiling water. I turned away for just a minute and the plastic had softened enough that I now own a "J" shaped autosiphon. Needless to say I can't use it anymore. If you want to boil sanitize equipment like this you can get a stainless racking ...


5

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


3

If you have missed adding it to the boil rather than as bottling primer, then there is a fourth option. You could boil up the DME in about a pint of water, and then add it to the fermenter. The yeast won't care that it wasn't there initially and will happily convert it into alcohol. The beer should be drinkable regardless, just may be slightly ...


3

It's a yummy malt made by Gambrinus Malting, in my home province of British Columbia, Canada. If you have access to Brumalt, I understand that that is similar. If not, maybe Melanoidin. If not that, a light crystal, around 25. As you say the Honey Malt is a small proportion of the bill, I don't think you can go too far off. I've made beers with about ...


3

Dry malt extract, when not completely sealed air-tight, will start sucking moisture out of the air, and the resulting block of DME takes quite a bit of hammering pulverize. Or, you could slowly boil it and stir the crap outta it to get the chunks to dissolve. Your malt extract is probably fine, so long as you don't see any funky molds growing on it. ...


3

Star-San is the best answer -- BUT: DO NOT use it after, ie: so as to clean and store for later use. Star-San is acidic and prolonged/sustained contact will make your plastic brittle and break (I have broken a siphon tube like this after only a few months of doing this afterbrew sanitizing). Use Star-San ONLY just before use for anything plastic/vinyl ...


2

With just sugar, you wouldn't be making beer, since malted grain is a key ingredient. It would be closer to mead, and like mead, the resulting drink would have no head since that's created by protein, which there is none in sugar. There would also be no residual sweetness or any other flavoring other than the alcohol, so it would taste pretty bad. You can ...


2

Sugar doesn't contain the nutrients yeast need to reproduce properly. It's likely that you'd end up with a stuck fermentation, and off-tastes (notably cidery, from acetaldehyde). As Denny mentioned, that would be pretty much the only taste in there, so it would likely be quite unpleasant.


2

Because sugar is 100% fermentable, there will be essentially no body or head retention. Flavor would range from non existent to a harsh alcohol flavor. Without additional nutrients, fermentation will be problematic.


2

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


2

Even if it was contaminated, as long as you plan on boiling it, it will be safe. If it was very spoiled (smelled bad), then it might have fewer sugars and the end result may taste bad. Otherwise, you should be fine.


2

The "malty" taste can come from burning the sugars in the beer. When you slowly pour in the LME, vigorously stir the boil to avoid pooling on the bottom of the kettle.


1

Black malts usually contribute a roasty flavor and color enhancement. As far as I know, they shouldn't impart a fruity flavor. Caramel malts, on the other hand, do. Check your caramalts. Common flavor descriptions for roasted caramel malts between 80L and 120L are "raisin, plum, prunes, burnt sugar". See Castle Malting's Ch√Ęteau Special B or Briess's ...


1

I wouldn't. I've warped an Auto-siphon that way.


1

Since this question keeps getting bumped, I thought I'd have a go at it. Here are a few relevant points from the literature. Malt has slightly less fat than unmalted barley: "Up to 4% of the dry weight of barley is lipid and 3.4% in the case of malt." (corn and oats may both reach 6+%) "30% of the lipid content of barley grains disappear[s] during ...



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