Hot answers tagged

9

Even if jsolarski's hunch is incorrect (that your extra DME is for priming the bottles), and it was actually meant for the boil, the beer won't be ruined at all. You just missed the original gravity target, which means: the beer will finish drier than it otherwise would have (lower original gravity will usually lead to lower final gravity) the balance of ...


8

How are you measuring gravity? I would double-check your gravity readings. If you are using a refractometer, you'll need to correct your reading because they are not meant to be used after fermentation begins (because of the presence of alcohol). If you're using a hydrometer, you need to de-gas your fermented sample enough to ensure that your hydrometer ...


3

The grain should be crushed, with a roller mill, not ground. This will leave the husks mostly intact, but the starch should shatter into fine, white particles. These fine particles will become your beer, include as much as possible. They should dissolve in the mash, or at least become very soft. They might end up getting past your whirlpool, and even in the ...


3

If you have missed adding it to the boil rather than as bottling primer, then there is a fourth option. You could boil up the DME in about a pint of water, and then add it to the fermenter. The yeast won't care that it wasn't there initially and will happily convert it into alcohol. The beer should be drinkable regardless, just may be slightly ...


3

In first place it's very hard to get a blood-red beer. The beers that are said to be red are actually ruby, copper or reddish brown in color. Just to make it clear because you are probably aware of that. My favorite malt for red color is Roasted Barley (in very small amounts - maximum 2% of your grist). Munich is probably one of the best too, and Vienna ...


2

All those answers above used to be the way to go. Since then, Best Malz has introduced Red X malt. It gives you the reddest color I've ever seen, especially if you use it as 100% of your grist.


2

As long as you have an oven, you can make that pils malt into toast/roast specialty grains and go wild. See some suggestions by John Palmer to start and take it from there. http://howtobrew.com/book/section-4/experiment/toasting-your-own-malt


2

With only pilsner malt*, your options are pretty limited, but you are not helpless. Pils, of course What else would you brew if you have only malt designed for it? If you can keep low temperatures, go for it! With access both to saaz and German hops, you can try both German and Czech varieties. Pale Ales can work as well Pilsner and pale ale malts are ...


2

This question isn't easy to answer - at best it's subjective as to whether it will be the result you want or not. I don't know the final gravity or IBUs that this recipe will produce - I could find out, but then so can you with the free tools available - simply put your batch size and the ingredients into a recipe calculator like brewtoad to determine the ...


2

Mill size is really dependant on the brew system. Sounds like you BIAB, so I won't go into to much. I would encourage you to look a other topics here about Mash Tuns. To answer. I like to have the grain cracked into roughly quarters. With husk almost entirely intacted but separated from the grain. There will always be some flour no matter the mill size. ...


2

Post mashing you've actually removed much of the nutritional portion of it and put that stuff in your wort. The primary component left then is all that fiber. Even using the unmashed malt for the normal human diet, its a very high fiber to nutrient ratio. You can eat it but it is a lot of fibrous material to digest. Thoroughly cooking it will soften the ...


2

You don't want to eat the husk. You can, but it's about like eating a wood toothpick. But we need husks in the mash as they work as the filter for lautering. As for using a spent grain. After a mash you will spead it out very thin to dry, turning it often. Puting it on a screen with a fan below helps speed up the drying process. Wet spent grain can "spoil" ...


1

I just had this discussion on the BJCP forums and while a Graf / Malted Cider doesn't have a specific home yet it May if it gains popularity. C2F is the correct category, but note a base style the wort best fits or list the malted ingredients and must portion, in my case I use second runnings so that part is easy. C2F was confirmed by two Grand Master BJCP ...


1

It is a tradeoff between amount of cracked grains and the amount of flour. Ideally you want all the grain cracked but due to varying size of the grains you will probably get too much flour, clogging your filter. Clogging can be avoided by adding rice husks to the grain (Especially important when making wheat beer).


1

To understand this malt you need to put it into perspective with other malts and the region it comes from; the UK. Historically, lager malt is a malt made from popular English strains of barley that would be used to make English Pale or English Pale Ale malt (like Maris Otter, Golden Promise etc.) English Ales classically made from 2 row base malt kilned ...


1

The Free Beer project has undergone many updates since its 1.0 version, like open source code. The 1st recipe was "buggy"; the most current version I've found is 4.1 http://freebeer.org/blog/ I can't find the intended malt they are calling Lager malt in 1.0 if I had to guess I would say Melonoiden Malt, since it's such a small addition I doubt it would be ...


1

I have not used those two malts so far (I should very soon though), but I still managed to get some information. Maris Otter: This malt has a lot of the bready, biscuit character that Maris Otter is famous for, though the Thomas Fawcett seems be a bit more toasty than the others. This malt is traditionally floor malted. I like using this one in my ...


1

Maris Otter is typically used with English beers, especially "ESBs" (Extra Special Bitter). You wouldn't use it in a hoppy beer like an American IPA - the hops would crowd out the malt flavour. It is often described as being more malty and "biscuity". As a relative beginner, I've been using an ESB recipe taken from a kit and substituting ingredients. This ...


1

1.053 to 1.031 is only 41% apparent attenuation. I can't imagine that 20% crystal malt would produce enough unfermentable sugars for such low attenuation. Another source of unfermentatable sugars is a high mash temperature. Again, it would be difficult to get such a low attenuation from mash temperature number even if you were trying. I think one of two ...


1

You didn't mention it in your question, but I'm assuming that you've made a 5 gallon batch. When I put those ingredients into Beer Smith, it shows a starting gravity of 1.062, which is perfectly reasonable for an IPA. Let the beer finish fermenting. It will probably take a week or two longer than a lower gravity beer, so be patient. In the end you'll have ...


1

Since you don't have a hydrometer, it will be hard to tell what's really going on. But likely, what happened is that your fermentation got "stuck". In other words, let's assume the recipe's OG was 1.060. John Palmer estimates that each pound of DME yields 40 points of extract per gallon of water, or about 8 points per 5 gallons. Assuming you did a 5 gallon ...


1

Great details stored here: https://byo.com/mead/item/456-chocolate-malt "There are a few different versions of chocolate malt on the market, ranging anywhere from the pale stuff (at around 200 °L) to the dark English (~500 °L). Using a broad brush, the English versions are usually the darkest and the American versions the lightest. Whichever you choose, be ...


1

Red X malt may give you that red color you're looking for, but it is way too malty,IMO. I've tried it in multiple quantities, from the whole base malt, to a few pounds of the grist, to a few ounces in the grain bill. Never been satisfied with the results. Personally I'd rather take my chances elsewhere



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible