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11

The "cara" in CaraMunich indicates that it's a crystal malt. It's essentially "mashed" in the husk, then kilned to produce sugar and a glassy kernel, like other crystal malts. Munich malt does not go through that process. It's a relatively dark kilned malt than can be used as a base malt. Their flavors and uses are very different. Munich can be combined ...


4

The definition of SRM scale is based on the absorption of light at a single wavelength, so it's only measuring one aspect of color. The way the SRM views color is similar to how things look when you put them behind a yellow filter. Beer color is of course more than one-dimensional - reds, oranges, even some green, but these are not taken into account ...


3

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


3

I say that it's unnecessary - the malt extract does not need to go into the fridge, since it's sterile from the producer. Also nothing can grow in the malt extract due to the high sugar content, so I'd say the chilling and reheating is just creating extra work. Simply leave the malt extract at room temperature and pour into the pot. If you want to decrease ...


3

I don't think you can calculate this number. They report a max extract using a standardized lab test obviously. But then the rest is subject to too many variables for there actually be something to calculate. Its system and brewer dependent on what the ppg will be. I think your calcs are spot on as far as getting in the ball park. Maybe assume a 5-8% ...


3

Stored cool, dry and out of sunlight, DME is good for 2+ years. The main issue is with it picking up moisture, when it then becomes clumpy. But once boiled it's still good and you can use it up to 5 years in small quantities (say 1-2lb/0.5-1kg in a 5 gallon batch.)


2

From the first item in the search results for "briess dme shelf life": Briess "Product Information & Typical Analysis" sheet for a similar DME [PDF Warning] STORAGE AND SHELF LIFE Store in a cool, dry location. Unopened bags best if used within 24 months from date of manufacture.


2

Pick a style of beer that is balanced more toward malt than hops -- a highly hopped IPA is going to hide a lot of the malt flavor. Something like an ordinary or special Bitter, Scottish ales, blond ale, or many of the lagers will give much more malt flavor. American Ale yeast (Wyeast 1056, White Labs WLP001) tend to be very neutral, as do some of the ...


2

Brewing is a lot like cooking. You can't often try ingredients in isolation - you wouldn't normally eat pure salt, pepper, chili, vinegar etc... the taste would be far more potent than it would normally be. But combined with some other ingredients (meat, fish, tomatoes etc..), they become wonderful with something else to play off. The same is true with ...


2

I generally agree with most of the recommendations, but I would shy away from a lot of the hops choices, especially Fuggles. It has an earthy, woody flavor that could conflict. I'd recommend a small bittering addition using a very neutral hop like Magnum with no other hops. Also, if you just want to learn the flavor of grains, it's easy to make a tea with ...


2

There is no fault with warming the extract. Some of the companies recommend it as it makes pouring the liquid easier. Good Idea: Placing the can in a basin of hot water Bad Idea: Heating the can on a stovetop or suchlike may cause the can to burst. What I do is warm the can in hot water in the basin while I wait for my brewing water to come to a boil. I ...


2

No, there are no consequences to this.


1

With just sugar, you wouldn't be making beer, since malted grain is a key ingredient. It would be closer to mead, and like mead, the resulting drink would have no head since that's created by protein, which there is none in sugar. There would also be no residual sweetness or any other flavoring other than the alcohol, so it would taste pretty bad. You can ...


1

Sugar doesn't contain the nutrients yeast need to reproduce properly. It's likely that you'd end up with a stuck fermentation, and off-tastes (notably cidery, from acetaldehyde). As Denny mentioned, that would be pretty much the only taste in there, so it would likely be quite unpleasant.


1

Because sugar is 100% fermentable, there will be essentially no body or head retention. Flavor would range from non existent to a harsh alcohol flavor. Without additional nutrients, fermentation will be problematic.


1

To save reinventing the wheel, take a look at this... http://byo.com/resources/grains


1

You will want to use a neutral yeast and ferment at the lower end of the temperature range for that yeast. Probably the best bet is WLP001, Wyeast 1056 or Safale US-05. These yeasts all contribute minimal phenols and esters, and allow grain and hops to shine. For hops, I would suggest a noble variety, such as saaz, tettnang, or Fuggles. Use only a ...


1

It depends on what type of malt but assuming you are looking at base malts this should be accurate, It's directly from Briess's website referring to 2 row pale malt. Darker roasted malts will differ somewhat. STORAGE AND SHELF LIFE Store in a temperate, low humidity, pest free environment at temperatures of <90 ºF. Improperly stored malts are prone ...



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