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17

The "cara" in CaraMunich indicates that it's a crystal malt. It's essentially "mashed" in the husk, then kilned to produce sugar and a glassy kernel, like other crystal malts. Munich malt does not go through that process. It's a relatively dark kilned malt than can be used as a base malt. Their flavors and uses are very different. Munich can be combined ...


15

Chez, you're in luck. I just wrapped up a double 1-gallon experiment with these two malts. Had the brew-bug one day & two 55 pound sacks of malt. My experiment was simple. I made gallon batches of 1.040 OG beer solely from each malt. Hopping was kept to a single 60 minute addition of about 20 IBUs. I selected a clean ale yeast and fermented cool to ...


11

Based on a standard Pilsner Malt, for Vienna the barley gets watered some more (44-46% water instead of 42-46%). Also the roasting is slightly higher at 90°C instead of 80-85°C. Munich is made with still more water (up to 47%) and temepratures up to 110°C. Water and higher temperatures lead to a more pronounced Maillard-Reaction and hence formation of darker ...


10

I smoked my own base malt for a smoked porter I made a few months ago, and it turned out really well. I used this Brinkmann smoker (I smoke a lot of meat so I already had it handy) and simply placed about 2 pounds of malt at a time on a bed of cheesecloth on the top rack of the smoker. About every 10 minutes, I sprayed the malt down with bourbon to keep it ...


9

I've done two red ales so far. In the first I used a combination of Weyermann Carared and Simpsons Dark Crystal about half a pound of each. For the second I used a pound of crystal 20L and a pound of crystal 60L with pale malt extract. It turned out a very nice red.


9

Not only the color but the flavor changes. Think of the increasing Lovibond of crystal malt like the darkening of sugar during caramel making. At first the color is very light like 15L crystal malt. The flavor is mostly one dynamic, sweetish. As the color darkens to say 40L it takes on some mild toffee like notes. 60L is more caramel, 85L is a lot of ...


9

This technique of holding back the extract until the end of the boil is a fairly new concept that's caught on in the last few years. Here's some reasons why its a good idea in general: Faster time from the start of the boil to the 1st hop addition Less chance of a boil over Less caramalization/Mailiard reactions of the extract (leading to lighter colored ...


9

Even if jsolarski's hunch is incorrect (that your extra DME is for priming the bottles), and it was actually meant for the boil, the beer won't be ruined at all. You just missed the original gravity target, which means: the beer will finish drier than it otherwise would have (lower original gravity will usually lead to lower final gravity) the balance of ...


8

How are you measuring gravity? I would double-check your gravity readings. If you are using a refractometer, you'll need to correct your reading because they are not meant to be used after fermentation begins (because of the presence of alcohol). If you're using a hydrometer, you need to de-gas your fermented sample enough to ensure that your hydrometer ...


7

First of all, in order to think that melanoidin is a sub for decoction you have to believe that decoction has an impact on flavor. My own experiments, as well as those of others, do not support that. Melanoidin will boost the maltiness of the beer in a kind of sweet, fruity manner, as well as have an impact on flavor as you describe. Too much of it will ...


7

Brewing is a lot like cooking. Sometimes your recipe calls for a very simple collection of ingredients (think good Italian food). These types of recipes can call for just 1 or 2 malts, and can be quite delicious. Pilsners, Munich Dunkels, Scotch Ales, some British Ales, simple Belgians, Wheats and more are all styles that can be made with a single type of ...


7

DME stays fresh far longer than LME. Old, oxidized LME has been pointed to as the source of "cidery" off flavors in homebrew.


6

A rich nutty flavor comes from a combination of a little roast/toasted malt and some biscuity strong malty notes. You get roasted/toasted from things like toasted malt, pale chocolate or chocolate malt (used in moderation). You can get the malt/biscuit thing from munich malts, and biscuit/victory malt. (Granted biscuit and munich don't taste the same, but I ...


6

Typically, dry malt extract is included to make up for liquid malt extract that isn't included. In other words, LME (liquid malt extract) generally comes prepackaged in 3.3 lb. containers. That's great if the amount of malt you need is in multiples of 3.3 lb., but that generally doesn't happen. The DME (dry malt extract) is included to provide the ...


5

If your yeast are in great shape and you are pitching the right amount, then there is no need for concern over it being a little sweet in the end. An extra half pound will raise the gravity by only 4-5 points for a 5 gallon batch. So go for it.


5

I received a couple hundred pounds of free base malt a few years ago and used it in a lot of different styles of beer. What I found is that it did fine in beers that had a higher percentage of specialty grains or was less malt focused. Styles like American barley wine, American Stout, IPA, and Blond ales it seemed to work well because it just needed to ...


5

Assuming we're dealing with just basic malted wheat, and plain ol' 2-row malted barley... Your malted barley has a clean smooth lightly malted flavor. It has enough diastic power to convert itself and other adjuncts, up to 10% of it's own weight. It is relatively low in protein, and easy to mash with a single infusion. Barley can be used for 100% of a mash. ...


5

I've been using both for a long time and I don't think there's any more difference between Belgian and German malts than there is between maltsters in the same country. I interchange them at will, although these days I mainly use Best pils malt (German) for both German and Belgian styles. I think it's the best tasting pils malt of all I've tried, and I ...


5

The crystal malts don't really get you to molasses in my experience. The darker you go its more like dried dark fruits. Molasses is more unique than that. I'd make the beer you are looking for then substitute some molasses at bottling time with your priming sugar. You'd need to calculate the amount of priming sugar to remove to compensate for the sugar ...


5

Boiling serves a few purposes in beer. Mainly it is done for the dual purpose of extracting bitterness from hops while also killing any wild yeast or bacteria that were on the brewing ingredients. In the case of hopped malt extract, the bitterness has already been extracted for you, and the extract itself is totally sterile as its already been boiled down ...


5

You can add some munich, or you can just leave it out. In a stout with that much roasted barley the difference is hardly noticable. I've brewed 4 different British Ales in the last 3 months, all using Maris Otter. Most styles leave enough room for the the wonderful soft maltiness of the MO to come through, some, like the bitter, just a little, while others, ...


5

Like Tobias said, corn is made mostly of starch and lack any enzymes which can convert the starch to fermentable sugars. Since you are asking for stove top, I am going to assume DME/LME and the corn will just be your adjunct. However, if you are just going for corn, you will just need a lot of it. So back to your question! Yes, you can does this on stove ...


5

I strongly doubt it will stand up to boiling water. Also boiling water isn't a guaranteed way to sanitize equipment - bacteria can still remain in hard to reach places. You should instead get hold of a sanitizer specifically developed for brewing: Iodophor, Star San are the two most popular.


5

Do not do this! Speaking from experience. I accidentally put my auto siphon into a bucket that was full of near boiling water. I turned away for just a minute and the plastic had softened enough that I now own a "J" shaped autosiphon. Needless to say I can't use it anymore. If you want to boil sanitize equipment like this you can get a stainless racking ...


4

I have put malt in a 1 gallon ziplock bag and crushed it with a rolling pin. I have done up to 5 pounds that way in the past. It was touch but it worked. I am sure efficiency suffered. Although, I never experienced any tannin issues from over crushing the hulls. I have also used the bottom of a flat drinking glass. But that was just for a few ounces and ...


4

This is a pretty good chart for malts: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Malts_Chart


4

One or two ounces of roasted barley is what I use to get that red color. My basic red ale has a crystal 60 and 120 in it as well. But its really the roasted barley in combo with those that gets you there. EDIT: Here is a Red Ale recipe from Zymurgy magazine you can try. I don't know if you can get these ingredients or not however. 7lb Maris Otter Pale ...


4

Good Eats - Biscuits I'm a good ol' boy, though, so ours are like scones without sugar in them. In beer, it's pretty much malt flavors and aromas that mimic the flavor and aroma of biscuits. Lightly toasted bread.


4

I doubt that you'd actually extract any aroma/flavor from adding dry grain. Which of course raises the question "what aroma do you expect to get from adding dry grain?". And as you say, you'd have to have some way to sanitize the grain to prevent a lactic infection. I can't think of any practical way of doing that.


4

I've often wondered about how to get more of that wonderful aroma in the beer, but unfortunately, I don't think adding a few oz of grain (cf. dry hopping) will add any appreciable difference, considering that the aroma that is there has been produced by several pounds of grain. (Although the wort was boiled which may drive off aromas.) Just thinking aloud, ...



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