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8

Keep it out of the light. ESPECIALLY if the fermentation vessel is clear, but generally, keep it out of the light. Light (specifically, UV rays) will skunk the beer, producing off-flavors. It's probably better if you have a closet or someplace else out of the way that's dark to ferment. But - keep it out of the light.


6

Protecting the beer while fermenting is a good idea. In theory, the "danger" time would begin as soon as you have created some isomerized hop acids in the boil. As those are the compounds that skunk. That being said, skunking is a time dependent process. So your beer can take a hit of light during racking and bottling and probably be unnoticeable. I ...


5

If the starter was not hopped, you should be ok since the hops are needed to produce the skunky flavors. The UV radiation in sunlight can damage yeast cells, but they are capable of self-repair to a degree, so there should still be plenty of viable cells to continue fermentation. It's a good idea to not pitch the spent starter wort in general, here, I ...


4

http://beeradvocate.com/articles/527 Skunking is described in this article as UV radiation caused breakdown of "hop derived molecules, called isohumulones", which then bond with sulfur, giving you a skunk-like smell. As other articles have said over and over, keep your beer cool and dark. You should have a safe, cool, dark storage place for your beer to ...


3

Here is some great information about beer skunking based upon wavelengths of light (http://www.safespectrum.com/applications_beer_wine.php). UV is the strongest light source that will cause beer skunking. However visible light, specifically anything under 500nm or thereabouts, are threats for beer skunking. And from this page ...


3

Your beer will be fine for a few hours in the kitchen. Skunking is caused by the ultraviolet radiation which provides energy for reactions involving the isomerized hop acids and sulphur compounds in the beer. While there is a small amount of UV radiation emitted by fluorescent bulbs, it's much less than sunlight - 8 hours under a fluorescent bulb is about ...


3

If it's not direct sunlight, the reaction that produces skunking will take longer, but you're not completely safe. You should probably take steps to limit the amount of light as much as possible in that situation. Maybe throw a towel over it as it sits.


2

I believe that the short answer is yes, artificial light can cause sun damage too. Ultra-violet light is cited as the primary spectrum/wavelength/frequency that has the biggest impact, and while direct sunlight is going to have much more of it and therefore be more detrimental over time, light bulbs generally emit a certain amount of UV too. From what I've ...


2

Hops react with light to create skunky flavors. So long as you didn't use hops in your cider (not unheard of), you don't need to be overly concerned about light. I still wouldn't recommend fermenting or storing it in direct sunlight if at all possible.


2

I'm just down I-5 in Portland. I tend to use carboys for my fermentation vessels, so what I do is keep the box the carboy came in, cut a small hole in the bottom of the box, cut the top flaps off the box and make a sort of carboy sleeve that slips right back over the bottle and leaves the airlock sticking up from the small hole, so far it's worked ...


1

You can wrap the whole fermentation carboy or bucket in a black plastic trash bag. It stops light and will contain any messy spills or explosions. Be sure to leave the bag open at the top so heat and gas can escape.


1

I live close to Seattle (puyallup) and we get UV rays even when its cloudy. you could through a pillow case over it but that wont block all the UV's maybe a open top cardboard box (assuming you want easy access). Ultraviolet light is often used to purify water because it kills bacteria. Yeast Is a fungus which essentially is a slightly more complicated ...


1

It's the hops that create that skunky aroma. The UV rays react with the hop oils and spoil. Also, if the fermentor is in direct sunlight, one would assume that the fermentations temperature would begin to rise until the sun sets, when the ferm temp would start to fall! Better to keep a constant temperature and keep out of the sun. At the very least, cover ...


1

In all the years I have been brewing I have brewed in a garage an on my patio in the broad daylight. I have never had a beer that was skunked. I would echo these sentiments, I have certainly tasted skunked commercial beer, however this was always due to packaging in clear bottles. At a home brew level, if you are using brown bottles and fermenting ...



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