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11

Firstly, be sure fermentation has completely finished before bottling. 1.029 is a high FG - from a SG of 1.090, that's about 8% abv. I would rouse the yeast, maybe even add additional yeast. You can use potassium sorbate to halt the fermentation, but at a relatively low 8% abv, you will need a lot of it, more than the 0.18g/l taste threshold. Better to let ...


7

If you happen to have access to a CO2 tank and just not the keg, you can use something like The Carbonator. It will go on the top of a 2 liter soda bottle and you can hook the CO2 up to that. My roommate has done this with great success, and I actually carbed a bit of my first batch of beer using this method because I was impatient. Another option would be ...


5

The answer is similar to the one in this post, but the short answer is that your safest bet is force-carbonating. The problem with bottle conditioning is that you've already killed most of your yeast, and even if you were to successfully repitch, there's really no good way to "turn off" fermentation when you reach your target carbonation. There are also ...


4

Maybe add a bit of Limoncello, some other lemon liqueur, or lemon extract. Another option would be to bottle about 60% beer and 40% lemon-lime soda. This is how authentic Austrian Radlers are made (although a lot of people seem to think they're made of lemonade), which I think are considered a type of shandy. This weakens the strength of your beer, but ...


4

Yeast needs a few things to survive besides just sugar. Things like nitrogen, lipids, etc. When you make an all-grain batch of beer, you get a lot of these things from the mash. But when you use "refined" sugars, like table sugar, the yeast needs a little help. You can buy nutrients at a homebrew shop. Take a look at this page from "How to Brew" by John ...


3

Just to paraphrase, your main goals are to reduce the amount of dryness and to carbonate (in the bottle.) If the concentrate is fully fermentable, then adding more concentrate can only help you achieve one of goals but not both at the same time: With the unfermented concentrate in the must add potassium sorbate to halt fermentation, leaving unfermented ...


3

Fermax yeast nutrient is made up of diammonium phosphate, dipotassium phosphate, magnesium sulfate and autolyzed yeast. Most yeast nutrients have yeast hulls, and DAP in them. You can also just boil some older yeast too. You can find it at any homebrew store or online homebrew store.


2

Just Do It Add lemonade to your bottling bucket after you bottled the normal portion of wheat beer. Remember that most lemonades will contribute sugars that the yeast will eat. Try to figure out the content you are adding and subtract it from the priming sugar. Watch out for bottle bombs. Measure It It is easy to figure out the volume of lemonade to add ...


2

Once you sulfite the lemonade to neutralize the yeast you cannot bottle condition. The sulfite will prevent any further fermentation which is necessary for bottle conditioning. The only option is to force carbonate. Although you could bottle still and add charged water to add fizz or bottle condition the dry lemonade and then sweeten at the time of ...


2

Just mix it at serving time. That's how many soda/juice/etc + beer drinks are made. You are right, if you try to do it up front with a non-alcoholic beverage, it's going to affect the fermentation.


2

It's very difficult to simultaneously get both a) carbonation, and b) sweetness. Particularly if the product in question is dry after fermentation is complete. See the answer by mdma for the reasons why. There are basically two ways around this: 1) Force carbonation. You kill the yeast activity via chemical (sorbate) or thermal (pasteurization) means. ...


1

Xylitol is not fermentable. So I would expect you could add it after fermentation has finished, to increase the sweetness without increasing the alcohol levels or acidity. Or, as has been suggested, add it when you open the bottles, but that might take a while to dissolve properly. I don't see how it could react with the lemon in a bad way, as it's just a ...


1

Why not use stevia? It's much sweeter than sugar so it will only take a little bit to reach the sweetness level you're after, plus it's unfermentable. Is there a recipe you're thinking of using, or you're still in the 'just thinking' phase?


1

Dry Ice Couldn't you pour your liquid into a pressure safe container, add some dry Ice and seal the container.I don't know how much dry ice to you, I imagine a little, otherwise congratulations you've just made a bomb, good luck finding your fingers.


1

Alternatively, you could bottle with a control (plastic 20 oz soda bottle), then wait until the bottle is good and stiff, and pasteurize, as this guy did with his cider. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f32/easy-stove-top-pasteurizing-pics-193295/ That'll prevent the bottle bombs, and should allow you to carbonate cheaply and easily. Naturally, you'll want to ...


1

If you want natural carbonation your best bet is to find a yeast will naturally low attenuation. For example White Labs WLP720 is a wine/mead yeast to make sweet wines and mead as the attenuation is less than 75%. I don't know how well it will go with your lemonade. You could also try looking for sweet cider yeasts I think Wyeast may do something like ...



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