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7

According to the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario: "You may make beer or wine at home as long as it is only for your personal consumption or to be given away free of charge. Homemade (or "u-brew") beer or wine may not be sold or used commercially." http://www.agco.on.ca/en/faqs/faqs_alcohol.aspx


6

Beer sales are regulated by state thanks to the three tier system currently in place. Find the website for the liquor division of your state's department of commerce. Every state is different. You need a business license and a liquor/beer license that fits your operation. I live in Ohio, and in order to sell my beer I need a beer manufacturing license as ...


6

1) I think if it said "Tips for the beer" then yes, it would be illegal. If it said "donations because I'm awesome and you want to give me money for no apparent reason" then it would probably be fine. I'm not a lawyer though. So.. 2) No. Unless you're throwing parties and the ATF has a sting operation and sends someone in under cover to see if you're making ...


6

Welcome to BrewAdvice.com Frank. This question is honestly a little too broad and all-encompassing for this site, but I'll try to give you some leads. Your best bet is to start reading, start researching, and start talking to people. If you're just getting started, check out the Brewer's Association. They're a good jumping off point. They also have a long ...


5

No, it is not legal anywhere in the United States to distill alcohol, unless you have a license. It is not practical for individuals to get licenses for beverage alcohol. On a side note, I hear it is relatively easy to get a home-distillation license for producing ethanol fuel. It would be illegal for you to consume that fuel, and any of it that leaves ...


5

No, it is not legal to distill alcohol in the US without a license. It is possible to obtain a license for small batch production. See the discussion forums on the American Distilling Institute web site for information on the steps required to license a microdistillery, from people who have done it. The concensus of opinion seems to be: it's not ...


4

Really, selling your homebrew is not worth the hassle of licensing requirements and so on. The 2003 Licensing Act states that the sale by retail of alcohol requires a license. And you will certainly come under food standards trading requirements too. Give your beer away to friends, and ask if they can return the bottles. Same outcome as your suggestion ...


3

As a member of the AHA Governing Committee, the reason I know of is that it just is. From the AHA website... On 1988, May 7 was announced before Congress as National Homebrew Day. The American Homebrewers Association (AHA) created AHA Big Brew as an annual event to celebrate National Homebrew Day around the world. AHA Big Brew is held each year on ...


3

Looks like you'll need an "off-license" and specifics vary from country to country, even within the UK: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_licensing_laws_of_the_United_Kingdom Realistically, if you're just selling to friends, you can slide under the radar. In the end, it's only 50 pints, which obviously doesn't merit the trouble of getting a license. ...


3

While you can't legally use a still for distilling your homebrew, you could 'freeze distill' it. Technically it's concentration, not distillation, but gives you a nice boost in ABV. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_freezing#Freeze_distillation


3

In addition to speaking to your state's liquor control board (if it has one) to find out what licenses you'll need to create alcohol products to sell, you'll want to check with your local health department to find out the rules regarding making consumables to sell. In a lot of places, you can't make foodstuffs to sell commercially in a private household. ...


2

The best thing to do is talk to the OLCC. I did that recently in relatioto a homebrewing class I'm teaching and they were very helpful. My layman's opinion, based on the work I did helping get the OR homebrewing laws changed, is that it would be legal. But I'm not a lawyer. Contact the OLCC so neither you nor your friend get in trouble.


2

WA state also has a three tier system and it is almost impossible to brew, distribute, and sell without a major (several thousand dollar) investment in fees each year. The key here is that you can brew and sell, but only on the location of the brewing and it has to be consumed there (no take out bottles or cans) unless you also have the distribution license. ...


2

I am not a lawyer and have not researched this at all but here is my opinion. Now I am assuming if you are putting out a tip jar that this is for a party. Then you wouldnt want to put the jar near the kegs because in the unlikely event there was someone undcover there then you wouldnt them to be able to say that it is implied it is for the beer since it is ...


1

According to the Canadian Amateur Brewer's Association there's a 'Southern Ontario Homebrewers' club. They have a mailing list here. I suspect they can give you a definitive answer, but the fact that the club exists suggests that homebrew is legal. Or you could contact CABA and ask them.


1

Don't sell alcohol, sell raffle tickets in an “everyone is a winner” scenario, and trade them in for the beer. It is an absolute loop hole. I know of a few establishments around London that use this technique and have been getting away with it for years (due to refusal of license), also, think of the amount of booze on offer at any raffle table (it’s almost ...



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