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11

The only way to train your palate is through practice. You can read about, theorize upon, meditate over taste descriptions, but to really get to know them, you have to practice. You can learn the aroma of the different hops by smelling some in your hands repeatedly until you can blindly identify each one. That's a helpful practice, but to really get to ...


5

Designing Great Beers has been the most helpful to me. It's also the most dog-eared and mangled of all of my brewing books, because I keep coming back to it for reference of one sort or another. Probably the two biggest things I got out of the first part of the book are the explanation of the chemical compounds in the hops, and the bitterness to gravity ...


3

You could try to just make a hop tea, either using a coffee press or just stirring it into the boiling water and letting the hops settle out. I think that should give you a good idea of the hop's aroma and flavor without any other hops or malts covering it up. Alternatively, just boil 2 quarts of water and add your hops. After 10 minutes, pour off a ...


3

Brewing Classic Styles is a recipe book, but you can learn how to formulate your own recipes by analyzing what Jamil did. I often use it as a starting point in designing my own recipes. I'd say the key is not to go to any one book. Look at several and kind of "average" their recommendations. Add in your own knowledge and experience with what various ...


2

If DGB has an entry about the style I'm interested in, I'll read it. But there are a lot of styles that it misses. As others have said, the first half of DGB is still solid. Brewing Classic Styles covers all the BJCP styles and gives a decent introduction & recipe for each. It's also more recent than DGB. So that's a book I'll always use when working on ...


1

Books are great places to start. But realistically, I have found that my recipe formulation never really got any better until I started to brew rather than read. I don't mean that in a facetious way. I brewed my Oatmeal stout about 7 different ways until I really understood how each ingredient created the beer the way I wanted to taste it. Books are ...



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