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10

I make a Bourbon Vanilla Imperial porter recipe that's pretty popular. When the primary fermentation is done, I split 2 vanilla beans lengthwise and scrape put all the "gunk" inside. I chop the pods themselves into 2-3 in. long pieces then add the "gunk" and pods to a secondary fermenter and rack the beer onto it. Start tasting it after about 5 days. ...


4

I've made a similar mistake before. Not quite as big a margin, but I was still way too low. I can't recall the exact numbers, but if you do the math right, you should be able to hit your gravity on the mark. You just need to figure out how much water you'll need to boil to dissolve the extract, and how much extract you'll need to bring your total volume ...


4

A late malt addition doesn't affect final gravity. The only difference compared to a regular addition is that a 1 hour boil alters the flavor and color of the extract to a small degree. (The wort gravity will also be different for most of the boil, affecting hop utilization, but since the recipe states a late addition, this will have been taken into ...


4

If it's American-style (American Amber Ale can be red), then dry hopping isn't a bad idea, as patbrew suggested. On the other hand, if it's a malt-forward Irish-style red ale, some raspberry could be pretty good in there. You can use raspberry flavoring from the HBS, or you can use raspberry liqueur, or you can even use raspberry preserves (look for ...


3

You can always dry hop. Dry hopping is when you simply add hops to the carboy during the secondary fermentation 3-4 days prior to bottling/carbonating. It doesn't add much in terms of flavor, but is meant to add to the hoppy aroma of your brew. I've always been told to use hops of lower alpha acid content as these typically add more to the aroma anyhow, ...


3

You do need to adjust the recipe for process. However, I am sure what you are looking for is an adjustment rule to convert another brewers recipe to your process. Well there is no hard rule for that as everyone's process is different. You need to understand your system, brew the recipe once as is. Then re-brew the recipe with changes in hop amounts to ...


2

The short answer is that the difference in IBU extraction is too small to worry about in a home brewing setting. This is the formula from 'Designing Great Beers' by Ray Daniels: Hop utilization based on boil time: Hop utilization based on boil time: Less than 10 minutes: 0.06 10 to 19 minutes: 0.15 20 to 29 minutes: 0.19 30 to 44 minutes: 0.24 45 to 59 ...


2

I like to split out a five gallon batch into one gallon jugs for experimenting. That way you could try dry hopping using different amounts and hop types in a couple and try out other flavors in the rest. When I do this I like to leave at least a gallon untouched to compare to the new flavored ideas. +1 for branching out and trying something new!


1

For a double IPA, I suggest a moderate-to-high bitterness and a massive hop flavor, with ABV in the 7.5-10% range. Denny is right-- You can really play with those hop additions and find your own groove. Remember, the later the addition, the more flavor in the final product. Given your specific hop requirements, here's what I would do for a 60 minute boil. ...


1

If you'd like to simplify your batch and increase the hop flavor and aroma, I'd make the following recommendations: Use just Simcoe for your bittering. It's likely you won't notice much of a difference in using or two types of hops since all of the aroma and hop flavor will boil off, leaving you with just bitterness. For your flavor hops, move them ...


1

Whats really screwed up is that for 5 gallons I get 1.057 which is right in the middle of your two (recipe OG and software OGs). What more likely is that you didn't get a good mix when you added your 3 gallon wort to the two gallons of make up water. ( I am assuming this is a 5 gallon batch with a concentrated boil). The lack of accurate mixing has led to a ...


1

After entering this into hopville..the ibu's top in the 60's. So in theory this should work. Most of my other ipa's i've used 60, 10, 5, and flameout. This would definitely ease the brew schedule. Hopville link http://hopville.com/recipe/1174343/american-ipa-recipes/10min-amarillo-ipa using a 4 g boil, ibus are 69 / After upping to 6 g ibus increased to ...


1

I'm thinking your fermentation is probably just crippling along now.. and adding more sugar may just make them stressed out..and potentially cause off flavors. But really... I think this really depends on what your goal is here. If you goal is to increase the ABV.. then you can consider adding more sugar. If it did not take off.. and you want more ABV, ...


1

I would rack the apple wine off of the yeast cake and mix in your sugar and some campden tabs. I wouldn't add it back to the yeast cake. There is plenty of yeast in suspension that will be able to ferment the sugar just fine (that is, until the alcohol levels get too high). When the alcohol levels do get close to too high the yeast will be stressed so the ...


1

I'm not sure that I'm contributing much here, since both other answers were so thorough, but I wanted to point out a few things. Most importantly, whatever route you decide to take, be consistent in your methodology from batch to batch. There are quite a few formulas that have been published for calculating IBUs, and none are 100% accurate, especially ...


1

I believe you are looking for a work around not a discussion about gravity, volume and utilization rates. So here goes: The way I work around this is to formulate my recipe as if I wasn't going to add the extract late. That way I know how much total extract I plan to use. Then I delete 80% of the extract (or whatever) and see what happens to the IBUs, ...


1

The point behind adding the LME late in the boil or straight to the fermenter is that the sugars in the LME will undergo the Maillard reaction during the boil. The gravity also affects the hop utilization rate. You need SOME sugars in the wort to isomerize the hop alpha acids, but the stronger the wort the less a given hop addition will bitter. Recipes ...


1

I'm going to take a crack at this since no has answered you yet. The benefits of soaking the spices in vodka or bourbon has to do with the specific gravity of the liquid. Vodka and bourbon are thinner than your beer, they contain a much higher percentage of alcohol. This makes the spices more permeable to the liquor that you are soaking them in. This ...



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