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7

You will have a much better chance of success if you ferment the beer first with a neutral ale yeast, and then pitch "bugs" (brett, pedio, whatever you like) into it. Simply open fermenting and seeing what happens is seldom successful.


6

Yes, any variety of sour cherry will give you equivalent results.


5

Without much detail regarding your recipes, your answer is going to be a bit shallow and lacking in detail. Regardless, here goes nothing: First off: Glass or plastic makes no difference in today's home brewing world as studies have shown plastic carboy's oxygen permeability is a non-issue compared to glass. Secondly, most Lambics' yeast contains wild ...


4

Anyone interested in brewing sour beers should keep an eye on Michael Tonsmeire's blog: the Mad Fermentationist.


3

What is your vessel? The bugs in Roeselare need more oxygen than yeast does. I've heard that using a plastic bucket, which lets in quite a bit of oxygen, can drop the pellicle in as little as 6 months. I've also seen people use the wooden-stick-in-a-carboy method that have dropped between 1 and 2 years. Like @Fishtoaster said, some people wait until the ...


3

I've been looking around and I can't find an account of someone who had their pellicle ever drop, including one guy going on 2 years. The accepted practice seems to be to rack it from underneath the pellicle when it's ready.


2

I made a soured Peach and Plum Saison recently for a friends wedding. It was a huge hit and simple to make. Instead of using various bacteria for souring I did a sour mash. It's simple to do and a lot less time consuming. To top it all of, this was a damn good beer. It's light bodied, highly carbonated, fruit forward and nicely soured. Joie De Vivre - Soured ...


2

I imagine that you could put a portion of the wort (a gallon or so) into another vessel with a wider open surface overnight (maybe a big kitchen pot or something), and then pour that into the main portion of the wort once it has gathered up some bugs. Are you inocculating at all, or just trying to see if your "house bugs" are any good?


2

Oregon fruit company cans unsweetened sour cherries that I've used to make a flavored cider before. Check the wine section of your local homebrew supply.


2

That's what a lambic is all about! That's the pellicle forming. Completely normal.


2

According to White Labs' site, they say WLP650 was intended for secondary fermentation, but it would appear that if you use a yeast starter, you may be alright. Q: I am planning a sour brown ale with bret bruxellensis as the only yeast. Is there anything special I should do with this strain and is this a good idea? A. We don't recommend the vials ...


1

I'd say let it go at ambient temp, different temps are helpful to different microbes and the barrels that lambics are aged in go through seasonal temperature swings as well.


1

Try chewing a small leaf, or making hop tea with a couple of cones. This will help you gauge how much bitterness and aroma is left.


1

I made a Lambic once from a recipe that called for the yeast out of a bottle of Chimay. I saved the last couple of inches of beer in the bottle and built the yeast up to pitching volume through a series of increasingly larger starters over the course of about a week. It worked pretty good, and the beer turned out great!


1

What I've found so far is certainly not conclusive, but it appears that lambics (probably the most common spontaneously fermented beer) are innoculated in vats with a very large surface area of the wort exposed to air. It's conjecture, but to me this implies that having a very large unrestricted exposure to fresh air (which is at least mildly circulated) is ...



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