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Check this out- The author brews two identical batches using a true lager yeast (Saflager 34/70) but ferments one at a "lager" temp of 50˚F/10˚C and the other up at 70˚F/21˚C. He then runs a taste test that included BJCP judges in the panel and found that they "were unable to reliably distinguish between pale lagers of the same recipe fermented 20˚F/11˚C ...


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The reason they say to ferment at that range is because it's within reach of the typical homebrewer without any additional equipment. The kit producers can then sell to the widest possible audience. To get the most lager-like results you can try: fermenting lower with the yeast you have - 17/18C will reduce the fruitiness (esters) that's produced use a ...


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There are kits with call themselves "lager" kits, but if you make them with the yeast provided and at the temperatures suggested, they will not produce a true lager beer. The beer they produce might taste quite similar to a light lager, but they will be ales. They would probably fit into one of these (2015) BJCP categories: 1C Cream Ale 18A Blonde Ale ...


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20-25°C, 68-77°F are Ale temps, Lagers ferment at 55°F or below. Above 72°F is usually only a few styles of Ales. There is a short time called a Diacetyl Rest where your Lager fermentation temperature is raised to 68°F for a couple of days at the end of primary. You really need good temp control for Lagers. Heating and Cooling.


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I just stopped by my favorite home brewing store this morning and I also had a question about dry hoping. I read somewhere that when dry hoping if you use hop bags, they should be sanitized first by boiling them but the gentleman at the brewing store said just dump the hops into the secondary fermenter. I asked him if that would cause a problem when it came ...


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In my experience grassy notes come through when hopping at cold temps. I've tried to salvage some old IPAs with a cold dry hop and filtering with little success when they are at or below 55° while it kinda works, they have always gotten a grassy note flagged by at least one judge. For a lager the last real effective time for a dry hop is during your ...


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I would simply dry hop before I started the lagering process. Do it in the bucket you are in with a sanitized sack. Then you can pull the sack and proceed with your lager phase. There might be some hop debris that makes it through the sack but it shouldn't be noticeable or a problem.


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The result is strain dependent for sure. In general, more esters is the prevailing wisdom, but more than an English ale yeast at room temperature? I've never seen the experiment done side by side so who knows. Experimentation would be needed to really suss it all out. Keeping some of the 'hybrid' strains as cool as possible can give some very clean ...


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Most lagers need to ferment below 55°F during growth phase to reduce esters and fusel alcohols. Diacetyl Rest Towards the end of the feeding phase (last couple days of primary) the temperature is raised to low ale temps 65-72° for a couple days, this gives the yeast a boost in metabolism to clean up Diacetyl. So heat is a good thing at one point in the ...


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In general, fermenting lager yeast at room temperatures would result in off flavors due to esters, diacetyl, and other components. The "California Common" is an exception to this, and the standard explanation is that the yeast strain (Wyeast 2112 or WLP810) used for this style of beer can handle higher temperatures than most lager strains. Who knows, ...



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