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A ginger bug is simply a lactic acid culture started from raw ginger root (with skin still on) and sugar mixed together in dechlorinated water. When you "add the ginger bug" to your drink recipe, you're adding the liquid from this culture after straining out the chopped ginger bits. After the ginger bug has been allowed to mature to a slightly fizzy state ...


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There's a good article about the ginger beer plant (which I think is your ginger bug) on this website. http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2008/07/ginger-beer-plant-101.html.


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This previous question may help you a bit: Is brewers' Lactobacillus heterofermentative or homofermentative? This is taken for Wikipedia According to metabolism, Lactobacillus species can be divided into three groups: Obligately homofermentative (Group I) including: L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii, L. helveticus, L. salivarius Facultatively ...


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Ginger juice alone does not have enough sugar to be fermentable. However, ginger beer is a popular, slightly alcoholic beverage made from ginger root, sugar, water and citric acid. Take a look at this question and answer.


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I have made ginger beer from regular old yeast before so there is nothing inherent about ginger that makes it unsuitable for yeast fermentation. Yeast technically speaking is a fungus not bacteria so how things that have anti bacterial qualities interact with fungi I'm not sure.


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Lactobacillus delbrueckii does very little to effect the appearance of your beer. In terms of flocculation (dropping out of suspension in the beer, leaving a clear appearance), I would compare it to a medium/high flocculation Saccharomyces Cerevisiae strain. With proper aging and use of fining agents if desired, it will not impart a significant haze on ...



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