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29

If you don't have enough reputation to edit this list, leave your addition as a comment, and someone will add it. Easy to re-use USA West (AK, HI, CA, OR, WA, ID, NV, AZ) Anchor Brewing- They look good and the labels come off easily. Alaskan Brewing Company Come of easily with water but do require a much longer than expected soak (possibly over ...


25

OxyClean. The stuff works wonders. Fill a bucket with a scoop of OxyClean and hot water and let the bottles soak for about an hour. Most labels will simply slide right off; some will even float right off the bottles to the surface. The ones that don't will be easy to remove with a rag or sponge. You also generally never want to use dish soap or detergent on ...


20

I started off just marking bottle caps with a sharpie. This worked well for my own purposes, but whenever I give it to someone they had no idea what it was. Last Christmas I gave beer as gifts, so I made a special label. I bought beer bottle label paper and was able to design any shape and print it out. Cutting out the labels was a pain, applying the ...


11

I don't label the bottle itself, because I hate removing the labels later. Instead, I mark the cap with a sharpie. I have a number/naming convention I use, typically something like Year-Batch Abbreviation For example, 10-04 HB is the fourth beer of 2010, and is my Hellcat Bitter.


11

I like to use custom bottle caps. They are really cheap and you can design whatever you want and have it printed on them. They also make for good stocking stuffers for any home brewing friend/family members.


9

For removing your own labels that you apply to your bottles, use a label with a hot-soak water soluable adhesive. When you're ready to reuse your bottles, a soak in hot soapy water is all that's needed to slide the labels off. Removing labels from store-bought beverage bottles can be hit or miss because each bottler can use different label materials and ...


6

Beerlabelizer.com is great.


5

I design my labels in Pixelmator. They are pretty small at 2.25" x 1.25" but this way I don't use too much paper. Speaking of paper I like to take grocery bags and cut them into 8.5" x 11" sheets, then feed them into my inkjet printer just like standard letter sized paper. Grocery bag paper has a nice texture, thickness and brown color that isn't as ...


5

I started writing on the bottle caps with a marker, but it could be hard to write on the cap. Lately I've been using circle shaped garage sale stickers on the caps. It's easy to use and I don't have to remove anything from the bottle itself. If you can find the multi-colored labels, it makes it much easier to identify the beer at a glance.


5

As long as you rinse Oxiclean thoroughly, there's no problem getting it in the bottle. I've been doing it for 15 years and I'm not dead yet!


4

I prepare my labels in inkscape/gimp and print them out onto card stock. I cut them a bit smaller than a business card, punch a hole in one side, and tie it around the bottle neck with a bit of twine. It gives a really classy effect without having to scrape stickers off the bottle.


4

I've used a big tub of water with some baking soda in it. I just tossed rinsed bottles in there as I accumulated them. Not sure how long it really took, since I didn't try and remove the labels for a while, but they came off really easily. As far as the amount of baking soda, maybe a teaspoon per 2 or 3 gallons? Not that much.


4

I've tried a couple of solutions, but the one that works best for me is an overnight soak in a big tub of water with a half-gallon of ammonia. The labels just slide right off.


4

I once saw someone use blackboard paint on their bottle so that they could use chalk on their bottle. Pretty clever!


4

My answer would be this: Don't bother. New 22oz bottles are about a $1.10 each. Used bottles by their very nature are worth less per bottle. I'm going to assume the idea here is to save some money and get some nice 22oz bottles out of it. The acrylic paint used on Rogue bottles is going to require a heavy duty chemical like turpentine to remove. ...


4

Googling 'White Grease Pencil' will give you several hundred options. Here's Amazon's offering.


3

On the low-end of things -- similar to "sharpie on the cap" but more environmental friendly -- I use grease pencil. You can write right on the bottle, and it comes off easily with a "brillo" type scrubber. The peelings from the grease pencil can go in the woodstove or compost, and there's no hunk of plastic to discard.


3

If money were no object, you go have your design laser etched into your bottles with a blank spot where you could affix a temporary paper label that would hold the name of the specific beer. Or maybe a less expensive acid etching. You'd want to do the etching prior to filling the bottles. For vendors, Google the term "laser etching services" For DIY Buy ...


3

For my wine I use a place called Landmark Label in Fremont. You have to order 500 labels minimum and they come on a roll (of 500), but you could do something that has a logo or whatnot and then an area where you could write in the details so you could use the same roll for years to come. You just contact them and send over the PDF, pick out your paper and ...


3

I make my labels in business card format using Microsoft Publisher. Print them on perforated business card stock, spray both sides with clear lacquer (to make them waterproof so they don't run in the cooler) punch a single hole in the corner and tie them to your bottles using string. The main advantage to this method is that you don't have to scrape the ...


2

Soak with bleach for 1+ hours in initially hot water. Then scrap them off with a butter-knife like whittling a log- works great.


2

Just soak in hot water most come off easily. Recycle the ones that dont.


2

I've done some printing of labels and also some stickers from StickerMule.com, but for quick labels, I use one of those "DYMO" labelmaker machines where you type on it and it spits out a text label. It's pretty handy for labeling fermenters, kegs, etc. with contents and date. We bought it to label crap in the garage, but it turned out useful for bottles and ...


2

Getting the Labels Off I'm only adding a little bit here. I only use OxyClean, like many others, but what I do is put the bottles standing up in a cooler, then fill them with hot tap water. Dump a bit of oxyclean in the cooler, and fill it with hot water. It holds the temp for quite a long while, after a couple of hours the labels are floating off, or they ...


2

If you don't need anything too custom, http://beerlabelizer.com/ is a great site for making easy labels. They claim to have good luck using milk as an adhesive, though I've yet to personally try it.


2

Most of the time I get my labels from beerlabelcreator.com. They have some cool designs, and it takes just a couple of minutes to create a nice label and save it as a printable PDF with 2x3 or 3x4 labels per sheet, depending on bottle size. Use glue stick or milk to attach to bottles.


2

Head to your local home improvement store and pick up some "Chalk Board Paint" (spray paint). You can tape off a section of your bottle, paint, and label with chalk. You will want to paint a portion that doesn't get touched so much... perhaps the neck of the bottle.


2

How are you sticking the labels to the bottle? I've used regular cheap printer paper, applied using some milk (skimmed is fine). Simply paint the back of the label with milk, apply to bottle, allow to dry. It does not smell (honestly!) and washes off easily.



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