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6

You essentially have four options: 1) Use a blow off tube. Advantage: Easy to do. Disadvantage: You risk losing some beer. 2) Find a bigger vessel. Advantage: No beer lost. Disadvantage: You need to find a bigger vessel. 3) Use a foam suppressor like Fermcap. Advantage: You'll lose less beer than with a blowoff. Disadvantage: Some people don't like ...


5

A healthy fermentation with a strong yeast will tend to produce a larger krausen. You're right about the strain of yeast being a big player, but the best thing you can do is increase your fermentor head space. In this case, the obvious answer is best: either use a larger carboy or smaller volume of wort. You can also get a little help by fermenting cooler ...


5

If everything's OK now, relax! Your beer is probably going to turn out great. If the temperature went below 16C/60F for ales or somewhat lower (maybe below 6C/42F or so?) for lagers, the fermentation might slow down significantly, but as long as you get it started up again quickly (i.e., not leaving enough time for an opportunistic lactobacillus to 'f' your ...


4

It looks like normal Wit yeast byproducts to me. Wit yeast is a weird one anyway, imho. Does it smell like vinegar at all? A Wit should taste a little tangy, but you just need to verify that it's not infected. I'd recommend bottling now, but start checking the bottles for over-carbonation starting in about a week, and if you start getting gushers, then you ...


4

Kraeusen, airlock activity and other signs of active/inactive fermentation are not reliable indicators of when to bottle. You should bottle only based on gravity readings - that the gravity is unchanged for 3 days and is at or close to the expected final gravity. A persistent kraeusen is quite common for wheat beers, and so not surprising your Honey Weizen ...


3

Smell: Smells like beer. Look: Looks like beer. Taste: Tastes like beer. Verdict: It's beer! I think the issue here was paranoia of using a new sanitiser and tech. The Krausen looked to me like colony of 'something' floating on clear head, instead of all the foam looking brown and Krausen like.


3

There is no harm on having the blow off tube. You could use it during the whole ferment If you want. As for avoiding it, the only ways are to use a bigger vessel as you said, or make less beer.


3

I'd leave it overnight and give it more chance to work. Just because there is no activity in the airlock does not mean it's not fermenting


3

I've always used a tube that was biggest enough to fit snug into the neck of the carboy with no stopper. I use a standard mix of sanitizer and a pot/bucket with enough in it sitting at the right height so that the open end of the tube is submerged. That's pretty much all you need to do. What you have in the pics is just fine. You're goal is to have some ...


3

I assume by krausening you mean priming with gyle. I've tried it and found no advantages to it whatsoever. It's a pain to calculate the right amount and depending on the fermentability of the wort you can get varying carb levels. I've tried priming with a number of things and always come back to sugar (corn or table) as the most reliable and neutral ...


2

Its impossible to tell what it is per se from a photo unless someone has had the same thing happen to them, even then... But I had something similar to this and I think it was lipids (fats) on the surface. The only place that would have come from in any great quantity would be the yeast. Five weeks in primary may be the culprit if it wasn't under great ...


2

The original gravity reading was probably low due to insufficient mixing. Unless you stir the wort vigorously for a good while, it will stratify with sugary wort at the bottom and thin wort at the top. See this question for more details about why your starting gravity might be low. The final gravity reading is probably correct. Did you taste the beer ...


2

I'm sure you know this, but impatience and lagers are not a good match! I just did a lager with the same yeast strain, and it took at least two weeks at 50F, 10C for the krausen to fall, and was bubbling for 3 weeks. This pace is pretty normal for a lager. I would leave it for a few more days, and then raise to 60-64F for a diacetyl rest for 48h before ...


2

The foam contains residual particles from the juicing process (I use a centrifugal juicer as well when I do my pear and cactus pear ciders), that have a fair amount of pectin in them. The best way that I know how to remove it (and help the final clarity of your brew) is to skim it with a strainer. A hand strainer works, I have used a grease splash screen ...


2

It looks like yeast cake because that is what it is. The yeast clumps together, and settles to the bottom as gets near the terminal gravity. That is called "flocculation", and some strains are much more prone to it than others. If you go to the manufacturers web site, they usually give a rating: low, medium or high. With the high ones, sometimes it is ...


2

Completely normal. If you don't watch it you wouldn't be worrying...


2

You're going to have to take a gravity reading in order to determine whether or not fermentation has completed. It clearly did ferment given your description of events, but now it becomes a question of how much, and whether or not it has completed. I suspect you may have under-pitched despite using a yeast starter, which would cause an extended ...


2

"The best way to obtain yeast is to skim it from the krausen of a currently fermenting beer." -John Palmer, How to Brew It may be tough in the jugs your are using but taking some of the krausen is the best way to get the yeast. Source http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-8.html


1

Many factors: Was the 2nd yeast of the same lot code?! Yeast is finicky and may simply not react the same way twice if anything is even slightly different in your mix. Was the malt extract exactly the same as the 1st batch? Dry vs. liquid, fresh vs. 2 years old? Anything different in how you prepared additions like Chrystal malt, etc.? Any differences in ...


1

Use a sterile wine thief to get a sample and take a specific gravity of your current product. How does it compare to the final gravity of your previous batch. Since fermentation is still proceeding, we can guess that you haven't reached your target gravity yet. Which means the krausen is heavier that it was last time... Possible causes... Did you use ...


1

You need to know if its done fermenting. Check with a hydrometer. You should taste the beer too. If it isn't done fermenting there may be several undesirable flavors present (unfermented sugar, diacetyl, acetaldehyde, sulfur to name a couple) It is possible depending on the yeast that the krausen just didn't drop and its done. I wouldn't try to stir it ...


1

That's a question that's been debated with no definitive answer. Some say it's better to blow off the braun hefe becasue of the bitterness it might contribute. Others say it's better to use a larger fermenter so you don't lose yeast. There really is no right or wrong answer other than "try it each way and decide for yourself".


1

Krausen itself will definitely fall back into the beer once fermentation finishes; you should see some residue/evidence, but you should only really see krausen while it's actively fermenting ("high krausen"). The trub/cake consists of a number of things: coagulated proteins, hop residue, other solids, flocculated yeast. 1084 is listed as a "medium" ...


1

If the gravity has dropped, you had fermentation. So, the answer to your question is yes, it's possible.


1

One of the things that you can do to really improve flocculation, and yeast viability is to make starters. Here is a great pitching rate calculator: http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html Making a starter is a very simple process but does require a little pre-planning. There are a lot of resources online explaining the process. I hope this will help you ...


1

The the layer of bubble might be the beginning of krausen, or it might be, as you suggest, the foam left over from pouring the wort into the fermenter. I'd advise giving it another 24 hours. If there's no activity, pitch more yeast.


1

It sounds normal to me. I normally leave my primaries for a month or so. Purchase a new primary if its a problem or plan better.


1

Krausen refers to either the yeasty foam in the fermenter or a method of priming beer with the wort from the batch that is being primed. gyle is another term for unfermented wort. priming with Krausen allows the beer to adhere to the rheinheitsgebot. one would assume that Krausen would impart no foreign or undesirable flavors to the beer because it uses ...


1

Nick's answer suffices for your "is anything wrong" question, so I'll answer your other one - "any advice would be appreciated on how to get a consistent fermentation." The one thing you should do before anything else is come up with a way to control your fermentation temperature. Assume the recipe says to ferment at 68F. If you can find a way to keep ...


1

There is a product out there called Fermcap-S. You drop a drop or two into the boil or primary and it prevents foam buildup. The ingredients are insoluble and don't seem to affect the flavor or head-retention of the finished product. The ingredients settle out during fermentation. From my experience it works great. I don't even have to watch the boil ...



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