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Fruit fly eggs are yellow 1/2mm long and will generally hatch into larvae in ~30Hours, so if they are still there 2 days later then they are specks of stuff, if the hatch then they are larvae, which will likely fall into the liquid and drown. I hope that helps you. Edit: Oh, also CO2 tend to put the fruit flies to sleep, so if they were to fly into the ...


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If you are willing to drink a lot of beer and recycle the bottles, then Newcastle Brown Ale comes in clear cap-able bottles. Thats where my clear bottles come from. Enjoy!


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You can always measure the specific gravity of any liquid with a hydrometer, but unless you know the starting gravity (as in, pre-fermentation), the reading won't actually tell you much. This on top of the fact that the byproducts of a mixed fermentation (alcohol, acetic or lactic acid, &c) will all have different densities makes a hydrometer reading ...


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You can't ferment straight tea, because the yeast won't have anything to eat. You need to add some kind of fermentable (sugar, honey, etc) and some yeast. You're probably better off taking a recipe for something that's already fermentable (beer, wine, mead) and adding your tea to it for flavor.


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I would think that chemicals in your starting ingredients can affect fermentation if they contain preservatives. I imagine the right (or wrong, depending on how you look at it) kinds of preservatives will prevent fermentation (that's sort of their job, you know). Of course, since kombucha is usually just made with water, tea, sugar, and a starter culture (...


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If the white bits are on the top, it is probably a mold. I once got this when I tried using honey as a sweetener instead of sugar. To get rid of the mold I first skimmed all of the white bits off the tea and then poured most of the brewed tea out except for a very very small amount. I then rinsed my scoby and added it to the small amount of brewed liquid and ...


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Basically, you need something with sugar for the yeast to eat to ferment anything. If you're trying to make Kombucha, you just need sweet tea and a starter SCOBY. Here is a good how-to A scoby is a Symbiotic Colony Of Bacteria and Yeast (SCOBY). The yeast eat the sugar, making alcohol, and the bacteria eat the alcohol to make a vinegary tasting beverage. ...


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I had a pretty decent hard iced tea made by a fellow homebrewer one time. Don't remember his exact recipe, but it consisted of fresh brewed organic black tea, a whole bunch of brown sugar and some yeast nutrient (and yeast, of course!). 1 lb per gallon of brown sugar should yield a brew of about 4.5% ABV. Here is a good list of fermentables you could use ...


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Yes it should. To quote Sandor Katz from The Art of Fermentation: 'Many people have observed that the kombucha SCOBY is identical, or virtually so, to the mother-of-vinegar that often forms on the surface of fermenting vinegar. Some have even described kombucha as immature vinegar.' So it's perfectly fine it smells that way (in fact it's an indication ...


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Yes, it will probably be related to the large Scoby. Either trim the scoby, or use a larger container. That seems a very short ferment too though. What size is your scoby, and what volume of tea are you using?


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Probably caused by the larger SCOBY, next time round trim down the SCOBY and try again. If it smells OK and tastes OK then you are most likely fine, if it has sulfur notes or anything else unpleasant, then ditch it and start again with a trimmed down SCOBY.


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Matter cannot be created nor destroyed So really the only calorie loss during fermentation is that in which the yeast burn and what is concentrated from the loss of c02 escaping. Ethanol has 6.9 calories per gram Sugar has 4 calories per gram Here is a calculator http://realbeer.com/spencer/attenuation.html#calories If you play with the numbers for ...


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Well in your specific kombucha I won’t be able to tell you but I can give you some math that should help you figure it out and should be able to be used by any brewer to figure out the caloric effect of fermentation on your brews. So just to hit you with the math right now and ill break it down later the equation to figure out the change in calories caused ...


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Don't add anything with oils (eg. herbs, herbal and fruit teas) to your initial brew. The flavours will stay in your scoby and the oils will go rancid and impair future brews. Add it to your bottles for the secondary ferment and just remove or sieve before serving.


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Like anything else in life unless you want to drink and serve/drink the final product with the leaves in there pull them out once you've gotten the flavor profile you want before bottling.


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Basically, nothing short of a scoby being fuzzy, hairy, bright blue or green, smelling like a diaper pail or biting you is all ok! Mold is pretty much the only absolute no-no. If it isn't moldy and you are happy with the smell (should be slightly vinegary) just taste it. You'll know if it's ok or not by whether you spit it out or not :).



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