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9

The solution I use is to mark my spoon with permanent marker. I have marks for each half gallon. Works really well without messing with the kettle itself. This obviously is kettle specific, so if you are using multiple kettles you can have markings of different color to differentiate the different markings per kettle.


9

3 common ways include: 1. calibrated dipstick or spoon (easiest) Before your next brew session, take a 1 gallon pitcher or some other known volume vessel. One gallon at a time, pour the water into your kettle, let it settle, then put the dipstick or spoon in. Mark the top of the wet line with a sharpie or craft knife. Repeat for each gallon. Measuring ...


8

Aluminum is acceptable, just not as good as some other materials. It's relatively cheap, has good conductivity, and doesn't corrode too easily. Some problems you run into are corrosion when placed near other metals, though that shouldn't be too big a problem in homebrewing. But, let's say you left a copper chiller in it overnight by accident.. could be ...


6

According to Brewkaiser, the ideal boil pH (room temp sample pre boil) should be around 5.2-5.4. Much lower than that, and you'll reduce hop utilitilization, but much higher and the hop utiliziation increases, but the bitterness is harsher. (The same process that causes tannin extraction at higher pH in the mash is at play in the boil also.) A higher pH in ...


6

I've actually been thinking about getting one myself since I too currently use my electric range. It would be nice to have the super fast boil times of gas but the even heating of electric, not to mention you can brew indoors. I think the major concern would be in controlling the temperature. I've seen some induction burners with only 1 or 2 heat settings ...


5

I always hear the myth that using aluminum will cause Alzheimers and I'm surprised no one has asked it here. This myth was debunked years ago. See: Alzheimer's Society: Aluminium and Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's Association: Alzheimer Myths


4

Removing hot break is beneficial to your finished beer. Many of the compounds taste bad and can stay in suspension through fermentation to packaging. Totally removing hot & cold break, such as with a pre-fermenter filter, can damage head retention. You need some of those proteins. Brewing Techniques has a good article on the subject. There are a few ...


3

Just treat it like any other mash tun. Before you pull that thing out of the kettle start drawing off wort through the valve at the base (at least it looks like a valve in the picture). Collect it in a pitcher that you can easily pour from. Then slowly pour in back in at the top of the cylinder. Do this repeatedly until you think the wort looks clear ...


3

I use an aluminum yardstick, which let's you do pretty accurate measurements on multiple pots/kettles, without needing to use a marker on anything (I've had problems with marker wearing off and worry about toxicity of the ink). Put a gallon of water in your pot, measure how high it is, and write it down somewhere. Then you'll always be able calculate what ...


3

I have done this for my first batch (extract). It is not recommended. I was using this model, which has a big-looking cooking area, but only actually heats about a four-inch circle in the middle. The heat is great. It doesn't heat up your house. It gets 85% efficiency. I calculated the watts to BTU's and it does get the efficiency they claim. The hot spot ...


3

Heat is heat; the source is somewhat meaningless when you first start brewing. The key is that you are happy with how long it takes to get up to a boil, and that you don't scorch wort in the bottom of the pot. Many brewers move outside with a propane cooker because the propane burner is a bit faster to get things boiling which shortens the brew day. If you ...


3

John Palmer says Deeper grainbeds have more uniform rinsing, all else being equal. An more uniform rinsing can mean increased yield, so then shape does have some impact. As Denny says, taller is better since there is more chance for the water to rinse the grains when fly sparging. (But, up to a point, if the grain bed is very deep then it might become ...


3

If you're using a pre-hopped extract, no boil brewing is possible. All extracts have already been boiled by the manufacturer anyways; with extracts, the main purpose behind boiling is you need the higher temperatures to cause isomerization of the hop acids so the hop bitterness gets into the beer. Secondary reasons for boiling extracts are additional protein ...


3

The problem with sight gauges with pre-defined volume labels is that the manufacturer is not able to determine what size kettle you are attaching it to, and even if you are an 1/4 of an inch off, you could possibly be a 1/4 - 1/2 gallon off the mark (depending on how wide the kettle is). I guarantee the 5-gallon mark on my Blichmann boil kettle is not going ...


2

The main problem with aluminum pots is that it oxidizes easily, which means that you can't use oxidating cleaners with them and oxidating cleaners are magical. But will they do all the horrible and nasty things that urban myth says they will do? Not really. Interesting resrouce: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Is_aluminum_safe_for_brewing%3F


2

I suggest you build your own. There is a great how to build a heat stick thread on homebrew talk. I have heard that carmelization is not an issue using immersion heater elements. In order to provide enough heat for a rolling boil you will need 220 VAC and at least a 4000-5000 watt element I believe. Electricty is dangerous, so is propane. Make sure you ...


2

Tour as many of your local breweries as possible. Sometimes kegs get damaged with cracks in the neck area. I have asked in been offered to let me buy these types of kegs from this source in the past. Your local package store may offer you the same thing. Supposedly, you can cruise local scrap yards for kegs. But the cost of stainless these days has ...


2

I have aluminum HLT and BK and used a dremel to make a small mark at each gallon level. I marked with a china marker when the water was in there (adding one gallon at a time), and after I dried it out, I used the dremel. I marked in 3 columns, 120 degrees apart, so I'd be able to see at least one measurement no matter which side I was standing on. Also, I ...


2

The main thing you need to consider is the boil-kettle in terms of size, because of boil off. For example, you want a 9 or 10+ gallon boil kettle for 5 gallon all-grain batches if you're doing a full boil, because you will have boil-off and generally want to start with around 7 gallons of water, and will want some room in the pot above the water line. 7 ...


2

I am a single burner all grain brewer so I figured I would share my process. Right now I have a 8.5g polarware kettle w/ thermometer and ball valve, a 4g pot for an HLT and a 10g igloo mash tun. My typical setup is heat the mash water in my polarware kettle, and then mash in to the cooler. Then, depending on how much sparge water (I batch sparge) I either ...


2

Two ideas for you, with the caveat that I have no direct experience with pumps + BIAB, I'm just spitballing here. A false bottom will keep your bag off the kettle floor and away from the outlet. I couldn't easily see if MoreBeer makes a false bottom to fit that particular kettle, but there's probably a generic product that will fit reasonably well. A ...


2

I have to agree with dax, it really depends what you are making. If you are in fact making a cider you might not want to boil it to utilise the wild yeast that is present on the peel of the fruit. If you are reading a recipe that is specifically mentioning your malt extract (or brewing kit) and it mentions that you need to boil it, then it probably means ...


1

This really depends what you're making - if you're making mead or cider, you don't have to boil anything (and I would argue you shouldn't although that's up for debate with some). Some kits don't need to be boiled as per their instructions - and this is probably what you have. You can mix the tin of goo with some hot water directly in your fermenter and go ...


1

I have a Blichmann burner with the leg extensions, and to that point, you may need a platform to set it on to do all of your gravity feeding. I gravity feed from the kettle on the burner to the mash tun (48qt cooler sitting on top of a 5 gallon bucket), and usually have to lift the kettle and pour out the last gallon or so when the mash tun is full, ...


1

If you want to brew 10 gallons, I recommend the Blichmann pot, although I would go with the 20 gallon size - 15 gallons is on the small side for a boil kettle for 10 gallon batches. Here's why. For a 10 gallon batch, you'll typically want about 11.5-12 gallons at the end of boiling, to account for trub, losses to chiller, losses in the fermentor, hydrometer ...


1

I can't speak to any of the Blichmann equipment, as I have none. With that said, I also run a single burner set up, and I would highly recommend you change the title of your 5 gallon cooler from 'mash tun' to 'hot liquor tank'. That is what I use and it works quite well...plus you have this already. So you heat your mash water on the burner and mash in with ...


1

I'm guessing what you're seeing is Limescale. The area to which you moved probably has a higher mineral content in the water which causes more noticeable deposits. The wikipedia value - Limescale I'm using Citric Acid to remove this. It can be either in a powder form (here it's called "Lemon salt") or as a part of a commercial cleaning solution. A sure ...


1

I have only brewed a couple malt extract batches using my built in induction cooktop. But I have to say that I love it and don't think I will ever switch to another method again. My cooktop has a 10" 3400 watt burner and during a recent brew day I was honestly concerned that I was bringing my wort to a boil too fast. My concern was primarily that I wasn't ...



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