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9

After sanitizing everything, you could connect the CO2 line from the tank to the keg, only connect to the downspout side rather than the normal gas inlet side. With the lid removed, slowly fill the keg with CO2 - it will fill from the bottom, pushing the air out. You can use a lighter to test to see when it's full of CO2. (Lower a long fireplace lighter ...


9

Something like this setup would be the minimum for 5 gallons of beer: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/cornelius-keg-system-with-5-lb-co2-tank-comes-empty.html A 5 gallon keg, CO2 tank, regulator, and tap.


7

Well, do make sure the beer is cold before doing your pressurize and shake. The colder the liquid, the more CO2 it can absorb. Otherwise, you can't go much faster than you mention as far as I know.


5

Freezing and thawing tends to force CO2 out of solution, but relax - the beer is probably fine. You should be able to remix the ice and beer after everything is thawed, and readjust your carbonation with no trouble. The beer should taste the same after your carbonation issue is fixed. RDWHAHB! And yes, the foam is likely a result of heating. For a given ...


4

A keg weighs just over 30lbs, so keep in mind it can have a good chunk of value simply as stainless scrap (at $1.5/lb it's worth $50). This will set a floor price. Making friends at a friendly neighbourhood microbrewery, if you are fortunate enough to have one, and buying one of their no-longer-serviceable kegs is one good way to go.


4

That's about the fastest method I know of. But, I've stopped doing it. It might just be me, but I've found I prefer a slightly slower approach. I'll turn up the pressure for 2-3 days and let it sit in the fridge until at the right pressure. It might not make much of a difference, but the carbonation feels different in my mouth.


3

If you plan to consume all of the contents of the keg within a couple of days to a week, this may be a possibility. Using oxygen to tap a keg of beer causes the beer to stale exponentially quicker than regular CO2, even more so in cold temperatures. I would advise against doing this unless you plan to have it all drank in one sitting at a party. Depending ...


3

Counter pressure and beer gun aside. I think you might want to up the pressure. ALso you can get a stopper to run through and squeese it to let a little pressure to let the beer in but keep it pressurized.


3

Use a BMBF! Get a racking cane and a stopper and you're all set. I bottle regularly from kegs using this method and it works great.


2

Have you tried soaking the tubes etc. in bleach/beer line cleaner? You should be careful about soaking metals, but plastic should be OK. However -- I'd be surprised if the aroma would transfer to beer given the time the liquid stays in the pipe. If the worst case scenario is to have some slightly gingery ale, you may as well just use those lines again. ...


2

My batches often dont reach 5 gallons. All I do is hook up the co2 to the normal line, then pull on the release valve. Since the co2 sinks to the bottom, the stuff that gets pushed out first is the normal air. I do this a few times since it takes a moment for the co2 to settle out.


2

I believe the $30-40 figure is when a brewery owns their own kegs, and wants to dispose of non-functional (by serving standards) kegs at near scrap cost. Ask your local breweries about their keg supply. If the kegs are owned by a 3rd party, try them. For instance, it seems like Microstar owns most of the kegs around here, so I called them; they send them ...


2

I imagine the safest bet is to unscrew one of the posts and get the same kind of poppet as the one you've already got. It's hard to tell just looking at the top of the keg, so don't take this as certainty, but those keg posts look like firestone posts. I have pepsi kegs, with firestone posts, and use poppet nr. 1 from CHI. You can also narrow it down by ...


2

It's hard for me to imagine that you can build up sufficient pressure in a plastic keg to carbonate with just static pressure - it's going to take a while to get the CO2 to be absorbed by the beer. I don't suppose there's any way to get a pressure gauge in line with this rig? If you go by this chart, you'll see that at 5-10 degrees C (41-50 degrees F), ...


1

Liquid nails or rubber cement would work nicely. Make sure that you remove the 'boot' and remove all of the old residue that may be stuck on. I would probably run some coarse grit sandpaper over that afterwards just to create a rough surface for the cement to bind to. That isn't necessary but make sure you clean the area at least.


1

I've heard liquid nails does a nice job.


1

I've heard of people using the adhesive for car mouldings to do this. They said its available at most autoparts stores.


1

This may not work for every keg, but I've had great success with "universal fit" poppets on my Cornelius and Firestone kegs. They take the guessing game out of finding an OEM part by picture on a website or catalog. Here's an example, this is one that I've used. http://www.ontariobeerkegs.com/product_p/unipoppet.htm


1

Not all of them are gone, but the chances of finding them are decreasing. The ones that are still there are more expensive than in the past.


1

You can get new ones for $90 (new sanke keg link), or you can buy pre-converted stuff at brew magic for more money, of course. Recent Craig's List prices in NC for kegs with questionable heritage has been $30 to $50. The story behind these kegs was that the brewery rep was repeatedly called to pick-up the kegs, and the bar was out of space, so they went to ...


1

Its still keg to keg filtering. You'll need to use different fittings from keg to tubing but operationally, its the same thing.


1

My guess is that those CO2 bulbs are designed to fill the vacuum formed by pouring beer, just like the CO2 you hook to a keg you're tapping. All it does is prevent your beer from being introduced to oxygen. Take a look at this site for some pretty good instructions on carbing your beer.


1

I doubt you'll be able to carbonate the beer without significant quantities of those. However, once the beer is carbonated, the bulbs may be enough to maintain pressure while dispensing -- which I think is closer to the intended purpose of this setup. My advice? Add 1 cup of dissolved priming sugar, wait a week, and give it another try.


1

Your method looks correct. You may want to overcarbonate the beer by 2-5 PSI, and raise the keg pressure to around 5 PSI when bottling. Slightly overcarbonating will help ensure that there's still a good amount of CO2 in suspension after you lose some from the bottling process. You may need to play with the keg pressure a little to balance bottling ...


1

Use normal pressure, don't fill too slow, then fill them so a little foam starts pouring over, then cap right onto the foam. Wipe the beer off the bottle after.


1

I've heard that carbonating through a tube that's submerged in the beer is faster, for example through the dip tube, by attaching the CO2 to the out line, or using a special carbonating keg lid. You could also make your own DIY carbonating lid. I've heard this method can cut the time in half or better. I've never tried this though, so I can't vouch for ...



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