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I've adopted a force carb method at serving pressure that carbs to desired volume in 15-20 minutes. This way you can control the volumes using the easy temp/pressure charts for a desired co2 volume. Set your tank to serving pressure, in my case 12 psi. With the keg and beer at serving temp (38°F), attach gas to the out lock (dip tube) so the co2 enters the ...


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Its not impossible to know how much CO2 is dissolved in the beer. There are tools for measuring it. Many professional breweries use these tools because have an exact carbonation level is important to them. As homebrewers we don't normally buy these tools so we can make random measurements. That said. It is well known how many volumes of CO2 are dissolved ...


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I would use a single 50ft stainless coil and then purchase the smallest cooler I could find that would house the coil and still have room for ice. I don't know anyone that has used a coil smaller than 50ft a 25ft coil may be sufficient but I can't say for sure. Good luck.


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The time for when a beer is ready to drink is process and recipe dependent. The beauty of kegging is that you'll see how the beer changes with a short pour everyday. Most of my beers go from fermentor to keg and I slowly carbonate. Takes a couple days, maybe a full week for full on carbonation. But they pretty much taste great at that point. Changes ...


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Carbonating and Aging are two diferent things. Aging depends on the beer style this is to make the flavors be more consistent or mantain the foam or some other things. for example if you brew an IPA: Brew Ferment 2 weeks Keg 4 days Carbonate and Cold Crash (gelatin) Drink Asap With a Imperial Stout: Brew Ferment 2 weeks Cold crash 2 weeks Age 2 Months ...


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The safest way is to force carb is to plug it in at serving pressure (12 psi for most styles) and refridgerate at the same time, leave it undisturbed for 5-7 days. This will also fine your beer with a cold crash, first couple pints will have murk but clear from there. This will shave a week off your normal brew to serve time over bottle conditioning. When ...


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Too much risk for beer in the gas dip too if you over fill or then get jostled for some reason. Unless you modify the beverage dip tube you'll possibly be leaving more beer behind than you want to. I would think managing multiple kegs that are horizontal (especially if stacked on top of one another) would be a nightmarish pain in the A$$! If you are ...


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There are some corney kegs that have a straight dip tube which can be position to be the lowest point in a horizontal position with a slight incline. The new torpedo legs are this way, also some older firestone kegs.. You can tell if they don't have a centered bottom, or simply open the lid on an empty keg. I don't see why they wouldn't function as you ...


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The only and main problem I see is that the dip tubes in the kegs are made to be used with kegs in the vertical position. That is to say, the bottom of a corny keg is concave, and dip tubes are cut to length and angled to have their end in the lowest (vertical) part of the keg. If the keg was exactly horizontal, about 40% of the volume would be below the ...



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