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2

Nope. ID really all that matters with respect to line-length resistance and system tuning. The OD does not matter, though it does make me question what type of material the tubing is … which would also affect line-length resistance…?


1

I would give it a try. I have done this with a Sanke keg several times. Couple thoughts: - If it is an old Pepsi corny, you may be able to unscrew the pressure relief valve, remove, use an air lock or blow off tube. - Once activity has slowed, (Like only a few points above terminal gravity) replace the pressure relief valve and let it naturally carbonate. ...


0

Hey thanks for sharing your problem. I have been having the same issue with my corny keg and I am trawling through all the forums to get a solution. I have learned that carbonating and serving my poor poor beer at 3 bar (45 Psi) is way way waaaaay to high. I disconnected the CO2 gas and vented the keg yesterday several times over a few hours to remove ...


2

Cleber, I'm trying things very close to what you're thinking. I'm no chilling, fermenting, and serving on kegs. But I think an extra keg could be a good thing. If you have one, I think it is useful to transfer from the no-chill to the fermentor to aerate your wort. I'm doing this over pressure to ensure air contact. Otherwise you can aerate another way and ...


3

Hop residue will be a problem. Even if you use pellet hops, you will get clogs in the dip tube or valves when trying to purge the trub from the bottom of the keg. I know this from a disastrous keg-hopping experiment. You'll want to exclude hops when transferring the hot wort to the keg.


4

You definitely don't need a second tank. What you need is something like this. If you have an existing dual-gauge regulator you can just remove the cylinder stem and use a nipple to couple a single-gauge regulator on there. Or if you have a single-gauge regulator you'd just remove the cap nut from where the second (high-pressure) gauge would be and do the ...


0

If you're willing to waste some co2, you should do the following: Chill keg. Make sure there's no pressure in keg. Put Beer connector on co2 line. Turn on co2.25 psi is good. Connect. Wait for bubbling to stop as co2 enters dip tube and bubbles through to headspace. Slightly open the relief, so that there is near constant barely audible bubbling. I'd ...


5

My experience has shown that going through the beer out line doesn't change the rate the beer carbs up. Whether using the 'set and forget' process, or the high PSI and shake method. The bubbles coming out the bottom really aren't increasing the surface ratio enough for it to be significant. The bubbles just rush up to the surface. The downside to the ...


0

This method operates on the idea that the CO2 will come into contact with more surface area on the way up than it would by just being forced into the headspace and diffusing down. Similar to the idea behind sloshing the keg which also attempts to expose more surface area of the beer to the CO2. Both this method and the sloshing method technically run the ...


1

Apparently there is a CO2 cartridge inside those kegs that can not be removed without cutting it open. However, some people have used them anyway. But I would worry about cleaning a keg with a bunch of foreign objects inside.


3

'because I'm still getting extremely foamy pours two and three pours from the first, I don't think heat is the major cause of these problems.' I think you're right. If your fridge really is 32 deg. the foaming might be an issue of over-carbonation. Fully saturated, beer at 32 deg/12 PSI will be carbonated to 2.9 volumes (if you're dispensing with pure CO2, ...



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