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1

Along with different beer styles having different carbonation levels. It's useful for abreviating force carbonation time. You can set the fresh keg to 30 PSI for a couple days to carbonate, instead of the plug and forget at serving pressure for a few days. While still having other beers at serving pressure.


6

You only need multiple line regulators if you want different beers at different pressures. I think 90+% of people just dispense their beers at the same pressure. Hence, they only use one regulator. If having a very bubbly Belgian Tripel and a softly carbonated English Mild on draft side is something you MUST have then two different line regulators becomes ...


1

I have a similar setup: 4 kegs/taps, one dual regulator with a T to split the gas lines. The positives/negatives are either obvious (cost of 4 regulators, having 4 independent controls vs. 2) or as you describe. One other negative is that pressure differences in the head space of (overfilled) kegs make it possible to suck liquid into the gas lines. It ...


0

Could try pushing the CO2 out of that beer and re-presurizing over a longer period of time. I do 24 psi for 48 hours. Could try that to get new gas in your beer.


0

Could it be an issue with a poorly cleaned keg? I've noticed off flavors when I've gotten lazy with cleaning seals / poppets etc. before. Otherwise time in a keg does tend to mellow out the flavor, but if you are tasting keg I'm not sure it will mellow too much more than it is now.


1

You shouldn't taste your keg. If you taste something that shouldn't be there, maybe it's a sanitizer or something that was previously in the keg? For beers I do, I think CO2 adherence to the beer improves with time spent in the keg. CO2 forced in doesn't seem to absorb as well as CO2 absorbed over several weeks in a cold fridge. Without knowing your ...


3

As brewchez stated it mostly for stouts with a nitro faucet in the homebrew world. But Beergas is preferred commercially if a tap run is really long. The Beergas allows them to push at much higher psi without overcarbonating beer along the way, for all styles of beer.


3

Most draft systems for homebrewers use just normal CO2. The beer gas of N2 and CO2 is used for 'nitro' dispense depending on the N2/CO2 ratio.



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