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5

The issue with this kind of faucet is that the seal is at the rear of the assembly (see 10 below). After dispensing, everything post-seal (pretty much all of 9, parts of 6, and the inside of the tap body) will be coated in beer. Being open to the air this will soon dry out and gum up the works. Best solution is to flush out the inside of the tap with ...


3

Update: I've made my standard taps self closing with the S-1098 Compression Spring from Century Spring. It's a stainless steel spring with the following measurements: Force: 102lbs/inch (179 N/cm) Free length: .560" Solid height: .350" Outer Diameter: .453" Inner Diameter: .325" This strength adds a fair bit of resistance to pulling the tap open, but ...


3

'because I'm still getting extremely foamy pours two and three pours from the first, I don't think heat is the major cause of these problems.' I think you're right. If your fridge really is 32 deg. the foaming might be an issue of over-carbonation. Fully saturated, beer at 32 deg/12 PSI will be carbonated to 2.9 volumes (if you're dispensing with pure CO2, ...


3

Option 1: Kegerator. Can be bought or built (google for DIY Kegerators and you will see many more options). Building gives you the option to find a fridge that fits into a random corner and holds the amount of kegs you require. Chest freezers (keezer) make great kegerators and they can still be a table. Option 2: Store the kegs in the attic, run pipes to ...


2

The Brewer's Association has the excellent Draught Beer Quality Manual freely available as a PDF (see the upper right corner of the page for the download). It discusses what you'll need to account for: both line length/resistance/elevation change calculation for balancing serving pressure, and long-draw cooling options (forced-air or glycol).


1

Could be any number of things. Style of beer, some styles require more/less carbonation and pressure. Could be a kink or something in the line that causes the beer to bubble/foam in the line on the way out. Maybe try hooking the keg up to one of your other faucets?


1

Not sure what your setup is, but depending on your setup and if you were desperate and handy you could store a beer fridge/freezer in some sort of non-living area and, assuming it's close where you want to drink, run tubing and shanks through the walls. I saw something similar years ago on a brewing forum where the guy put a beer freezer in a utility room ...


1

Sounds like you need to carve out some space in the living room for a simple two tap towered mini fridge. Professionally made ones can be quite attractive and will normally hold two kegs and the CO2 tank.



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