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4

You should be OK. The connectors are not identical inside the keg. The beer out connector has a long tube to take it to the bottom of the keg. The gas in connector is open near the top of the keg. This is so the gas pushes the beer up the tube from the bottom. By reversing the posts you are effectively pushing the beer out the top of the keg by bubbling CO2 ...


3

If you plan to consume all of the contents of the keg within a couple of days to a week, this may be a possibility. Using oxygen to tap a keg of beer causes the beer to stale exponentially quicker than regular CO2, even more so in cold temperatures. I would advise against doing this unless you plan to have it all drank in one sitting at a party. Depending ...


2

Yes. The top cap of the tower is removable (at least on every tower I've ever seen). There is a piece that replaces the cap and adds a few inches to the tower's height. The result is your original single faucet with new faucets slightly above and to either side, like |* . *|. The existing tower will need to be able to accommodate the two additional beer ...


2

Those are ball lock kegs. You can use PBW (or Oxiclean) to clean them and StarSan to sanitize. Common CO2 tank sizes are 5 gal. and 20 gal. 5 gal. are more portable if that matters to you. I use a 20 gal. and only need to get it filled once a year. Here is some excellent info on cleaning, maintaining, and using kegs.... ...


2

I would increase the length of your lines. Three feet is pretty short. Using the links provided by Denny Conn should give you a better idea of what you will need to increase resistance and prevent foaming. Keep in mind that the diameter of the line also plays a big roll in resistance, not just length. The same goes for the difference in height from where the ...


2

I built one from a chest freezer, putting a tower on top. I've had it nearly 7 years, and I love it. I put the chest freezer on a set of blocks, so it sits at the perfect height. You can pour whatever you would, just like you would from a professional setup at a bar. With mine I can hold a 5 lbs CO2 tank and 4 corny kegs. Here's the tap itself: The tower ...


2

I am constructing one too from a chest freezer. With the Tower config: It is awkward to open and close with all that faff hanging off the top, to aid in opening and closing you can have the keezer sideways, so you don't have to pull away from the wall to open and close. Tower setup often needs to be cooled to so you need to factor that into your plans (I ...


1

I built with a collar, and after having it for 6 months, I don't think I'd change anything. Getting kegs in/out is nice and easy, and with the collar I have enough height to fit an extra corny on the compressor hump (handy for cold-crashing). I keep a fan inside it to keep the temperature even throughout. The collar has an added bonus of giving you a ...


1

Original Source: BYO.com Balancing your Draft System: Advanced Brewing With: 3/16" beer lines Serving tap 2ft above the keg 5 PSI CO2 serving/dispensing pressure (high for some Homebrewers) A 2ft beer line would be a good starting place (but start longer you can always cut some off but you can't put back on). A matter of balance Calculating ...


1

7.2 cu. ft. will get you about 4 5-gallon cornelius kegs by the looks of it. Homebrew Talk has a well-documented topic about someone converting that freezer, and it looks as though he's strapped his CO2 tank to the outside. If you want to keep the tank on the inside, you may likely drop the kegs from 4 down to 3 or even two depending on the size of the CO2 ...


1

You're moving air, and the air can be cooled or heated to form the basis of energy transfer between the two chambers. So the system will work at some basic level. However, it may not transfer much energy between the chambers in relation to the efficiency and energy used. If the chambers are adjacent, then it might work, but if they are separated and you ...


1

Just had a cool idea, ya know the flapped contraption that connects the outflow tube from your dryer to the outside of your house? What if you connected a temp probe to your secondary temp control box and ran the powered end to a fan in your keezer, and put that fan in front of a similar flapped device that would allow your cold (or warm) air to flow into ...



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