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8

If the beer is being kept cool and you are using CO2 to push (which I assume you are) then it can last for months. I think the longest I've ever had a Corny keg last is three months, but that was finishing it, not spoilage. Kept refrigerated, sealed and under CO2, it should last longer than it takes you to drink it. The one thing you may want to keep ...


8

As you drink the keg, you're replacing the beer in the keg with CO2. The CO2 isn't going to stale your beer. As long as you are keeping the pressure in the keg high enough to ensure that the carbonation doesn't dissipate into the keg's head space, the beer should stay tasty for quite a long time. Unlike kegerators, hand-pump kegs replace the beer with air, ...


7

I have converted all three at one time or another and am currently using a chest freezer for the following reasons: Chest freezers are larger inside. Chest freezers are better insulated and use less energy. My current kegerator is the smallest chest freezer I could find at Lowes. It fits 3 soda kegs and a 5lb CO2 cylinder. My taps are on the front of ...


6

The best thing to use is a product called Damprid. I think it's a silica based product that absorbs moisture in the air. You can usually find it a places like home depot or lowes. It comes in a tub like container and you just take the lid off and leave it in the freezer. You can reuse the product by drying it out in the oven.


5

Use some faucet soothers, or faucet spout plug. This keeps the flies out.


5

Man your question is the answer. You described it exactly how I would do it. I have done it this way in the past with homebrew beer and it works fine. I would suggest two mods to your process. Don't bother with the bottling wand and its a source of turbulance that will help generate more foam. Just go with a straight shot of tubing from the tap to the ...


4

Condensation is usually caused by opening the kegerator and letting warmer, more humid air in. However, getting a good seal and good insulation on your kegerator is important for keeping your energy usage to a minimum. After all, running a kegerator can be spendy. Silicone or latex caulk are relatively easy to apply and give a good seal. Insulating the ...


4

Jim makes good comments. Especially regarding chest freezer efficiency at staying cold, even when open. I'll add that I like a standing fridge for ease of loading and unloading. However, its tough sometimes to reach in and add/remove the connectors from the top of the kegs. Unless you have a full standing fridge (without a freezer portion) it got a little ...


4

If condensation occurs and you don't open the door very often, then you have a problem with the seal or insulation. Make sure that the door seals properly and the hole that your lines run though is not so large that lots of air can pass through. Also, if you have a draft tower connected directly to the kegerator... insulate it. Air leakage is more than ...


4

You should be OK. The connectors are not identical inside the keg. The beer out connector has a long tube to take it to the bottom of the keg. The gas in connector is open near the top of the keg. This is so the gas pushes the beer up the tube from the bottom. By reversing the posts you are effectively pushing the beer out the top of the keg by bubbling CO2 ...


3

I think it should be fairly simple to adapt to corny kegs (in fact there is a picture of the fridge filled with corny kegs.) You have QDs for the kegs, so you have the connectors needed on the keg side. You also need hoses and connectors to connect the keg to the tower and to CO2: to beer in on the tower: push 6-10' of 3/16" beer line over the barbed beer ...


3

It's actually kind of difficult to use those kegs for serving, which is why you'll generally see homebrewers using 5 gal. keg for serving and reworking the 1/2 bbl. kegs into kettles. To use the to serve, you need to remove the ring and spear, clean them, and then fill them. You need to get the appropriate fittings for gas and serving. You might want to ...


3

The co2 high pressure gage does show a lower reading at lower temperatures but the actual amount of CO2 in the tank is not decreased. When the tank is full the gas is actually in liquid form and the gage will remain at the same reading until all of the liquid turns to gas. At this point the gage will drop into the red area that usually says "order gas." ...


3

I can think of a couple reasons. One is that the beer is over carbonated...maybe not literally, but it indicates your system may be out of balance. The other reason would be if you had a long line from the keg to the tap. The line is warmer and the CO2 comes out of solution in the line.


3

If you plan to consume all of the contents of the keg within a couple of days to a week, this may be a possibility. Using oxygen to tap a keg of beer causes the beer to stale exponentially quicker than regular CO2, even more so in cold temperatures. I would advise against doing this unless you plan to have it all drank in one sitting at a party. Depending ...


2

Another very good option is to buy a small chest freezer from the local big-box store and buy a home brew conversion kit from one of the online brew stores that includes a CO2 bottle, gas and liquid lines, regulator, shank, taps and hardware. You need to add is add a thermo-controller that will override the freezers temperature controls (also available from ...


2

I'm more of a Do-It-Yourself kinda guy. However I can give you some brewadvice. Looking at the Beverage Factory website, Beverage-air and Sanyo are decent brands. Can't say anything about Summit either way. Look for a model that is energy efficient and sturdy. The tower should seat solidly on the unit and not give when you pull the tap. If they don't ...


2

I recently bought the "Danby 4.4 cu. ft. Designer Series Compact All-Refrigerator" from hhgregg (http://www.hhgregg.com/ProductDetail.asp?SID=n&ProductID=16331). It works well but be advised you can only fit 2 kegs if you're using the taller/skinnier ones (8.5" diameter). Typically the ball lock kegs are this size. Someone posted some details for ...


2

A CO2 regulator has a standard connector which would fit any size CO2 tank you'd be able to handle at the home level. Most people start with a standard 5 lb tank. Its about 6 inches wide, and 1.5 feet tall. The next size up is a 20lb tank. Its something like 2 feet tall and 8 inches wide. Those are the most popular. I strongly recommend finding a place ...


2

Wow, you've found a cleaner that I've never heard of before. Glo-san, from the one online seller that sells it, it claimed to be like PBW. But I can't find any real MSDS for the product nor any real discussion on it. I would suggest you throw the Glo-san away. Too sketchy. I would suggest BLC Beer Line Cleaner. BLC requires a 15 minute soak and then a ...


2

Do you know what Biogon is? Great mixture of CO2 and Nitrogen. We use it in Czech Republic, but I do not know if it is available in the USA. CO2 keeps the carbonation, Nitrogen preserves it, so it is a great combination. I think it is called Mixed Gas in your country


2

Force carbonating is the main reason you'd want to have a dual regulator, but I'd rather have two co2 tanks, each with their own regulator. I use one tank for force carbonating 1-2 kegs, and I have another tank for serving 3 kegs. I prefer this set up because when one tank is empty, I can easily switch over to the other tank. No need to suffer without beer ...


2

Yes. The top cap of the tower is removable (at least on every tower I've ever seen). There is a piece that replaces the cap and adds a few inches to the tower's height. The result is your original single faucet with new faucets slightly above and to either side, like |* . *|. The existing tower will need to be able to accommodate the two additional beer ...


2

I have a buddy who did this for several years before investing in a beer fridge. Its not ideal, but it works. The main difference to remember is that C02 becomes more soluble in liquid as the liquid drops in temperature, and less as it rises. So this means you'll need to push more C02 in to carbonate room temp kegs than cold ones.


2

Those are ball lock kegs. You can use PBW (or Oxiclean) to clean them and StarSan to sanitize. Common CO2 tank sizes are 5 gal. and 20 gal. 5 gal. are more portable if that matters to you. I use a 20 gal. and only need to get it filled once a year. Here is some excellent info on cleaning, maintaining, and using kegs.... ...


2

This is the a great kegging reference too! http://www.scribd.com/doc/22270649/Summerzym95-Kegging-How-To Good pictures and informative reading with no fluff


2

I would increase the length of your lines. Three feet is pretty short. Using the links provided by Denny Conn should give you a better idea of what you will need to increase resistance and prevent foaming. Keep in mind that the diameter of the line also plays a big roll in resistance, not just length. The same goes for the difference in height from where the ...


2

I am constructing one too from a chest freezer. With the Tower config: It is awkward to open and close with all that faff hanging off the top, to aid in opening and closing you can have the keezer sideways, so you don't have to pull away from the wall to open and close. Tower setup often needs to be cooled to so you need to factor that into your plans (I ...


2

I built one from a chest freezer, putting a tower on top. I've had it nearly 7 years, and I love it. I put the chest freezer on a set of blocks, so it sits at the perfect height. You can pour whatever you would, just like you would from a professional setup at a bar. With mine I can hold a 5 lbs CO2 tank and 4 corny kegs. Here's the tap itself: The tower ...



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