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Along with different beer styles having different carbonation levels. It's useful for abreviating force carbonation time. You can set the fresh keg to 30 PSI for a couple days to carbonate, instead of the plug and forget at serving pressure for a few days. While still having other beers at serving pressure.


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You only need multiple line regulators if you want different beers at different pressures. I think 90+% of people just dispense their beers at the same pressure. Hence, they only use one regulator. If having a very bubbly Belgian Tripel and a softly carbonated English Mild on draft side is something you MUST have then two different line regulators becomes ...


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I have a similar setup: 4 kegs/taps, one dual regulator with a T to split the gas lines. The positives/negatives are either obvious (cost of 4 regulators, having 4 independent controls vs. 2) or as you describe. One other negative is that pressure differences in the head space of (overfilled) kegs make it possible to suck liquid into the gas lines. It ...


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Your corney keg will be fine. The issue of corrosion comes into play if there are unpassified areas, usually from cleaning with an abrasive. You can repassify to restore the oxide layer with a mild acid like starsan or bar keepers friend. Soak and let air dry.


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If you plan on creating any of these beer cocktails and have access to a kegging system, this is your best approach: allow primary fermentation to complete add potassium sorbate and potassium metabisulfite (Campden tablets) wait 12 hours rack to keg and carbonate If you follow the above directions, you should be able to add any normally fermentable ...


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Could try pushing the CO2 out of that beer and re-presurizing over a longer period of time. I do 24 psi for 48 hours. Could try that to get new gas in your beer.


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Could it be an issue with a poorly cleaned keg? I've noticed off flavors when I've gotten lazy with cleaning seals / poppets etc. before. Otherwise time in a keg does tend to mellow out the flavor, but if you are tasting keg I'm not sure it will mellow too much more than it is now.


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You shouldn't taste your keg. If you taste something that shouldn't be there, maybe it's a sanitizer or something that was previously in the keg? For beers I do, I think CO2 adherence to the beer improves with time spent in the keg. CO2 forced in doesn't seem to absorb as well as CO2 absorbed over several weeks in a cold fridge. Without knowing your ...


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You can make a bottled shandy by using the zest of the fruit rather than the juice of the fruit. The zest is oil and terpine based rather than juice based, and it is magnitudes stronger in the taste of the fruit without all the extra sugar. Additionally you can add and should add it in the beginning while all the ingredients are being sanitized. If you are ...



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