Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Well you carbonate the beer in the keg the same way as if you were going to serve from the keg. There is no carbonation procedure on the way into the bottle. To get carbonated beer into the bottles however, the cheapest way to do it is to jam some 3/8ths inch tubing onto the end of your picnic tap. Using about an 12 inch piece of tubing you can put the ...


12

There are two parts - carbonation, and getting it in the bottles. For carbonation, there are various methods, but I use the set-it-and-forget-it method. Beer goes in keg, keg goes in fridge, CO2 gas gets put on keg. Just set the pressure to the amount of CO2 you want in solution - "volumes" of CO2 - based on the style of beer and a handy temperature / ...


10

Is your IPA in the bottles any good? Is the carbonation OK? If so, then do not do this, or you risk ruining the beer. Moving the beer from bottles to a keg introduces a great deal of oxygen into the beer, which will dramatically shorten the shelf life of the brew and possibly introduce off flavors pretty quickly. Having said that, I actually did this ...


9

First, go to your living room. Trust me.... Flip over your easy chair and shake it all around. Trust me... Flip over your couch. Don't eat the crusty old cheetos that fall out. Trust me, I am not insane. Gather up the loose change. Unlatch the lid, the keg pressure will keep the lid closed. The wedge a penny under each foot of the lid latch, between ...


9

As you drink the keg, you're replacing the beer in the keg with CO2. The CO2 isn't going to stale your beer. As long as you are keeping the pressure in the keg high enough to ensure that the carbonation doesn't dissipate into the keg's head space, the beer should stay tasty for quite a long time. Unlike kegerators, hand-pump kegs replace the beer with air, ...


9

If the beer is being kept cool and you are using CO2 to push (which I assume you are) then it can last for months. I think the longest I've ever had a Corny keg last is three months, but that was finishing it, not spoilage. Kept refrigerated, sealed and under CO2, it should last longer than it takes you to drink it. The one thing you may want to keep ...


9

I think I would replace all of the seals and soak the kegs in hot Oxyclean Free or PBW for a few days. Maybe rinse and refill with that a couple of times. Then I'd just use them with strong flavored beers, or beers that would go well with the root-beer flavor for a couple of batches. If you don't notice any off-flavors, move to more subtle brews. If ...


8

Even if you turn the CO2 down, there may still be pressure in the headspace of the keg. Flip the regulator off on the CO2 and pull on the pressure release valve on top of the keg. A lot of hissing will ensue as the CO2 races out. You might as well let it depressurize completely as CO2 is cheap. On a side note, don't breathe directly from this stream of ...


7

Too bad this one is already answered because this answer is "the ticket". But hopefully it will be upvoted when you see the picture: Lay the keg on it's side and hook a wrench on one of the tabs. When you rotate the wrench, it pushes on the ball and the CO2 escapes. Easy, no fuss, no muss. Or maybe you'll down vote it for such crappy art work :(


7

I always thought standard quarter barrels were ponies. And according to Micromatic a Pony Keg IS a standard quarter barrel. The tall quarters are called "slim quarters". Here is a link: Micromatic Chart


7

I will sanitize a mesh bag, put the whole hops in the bag, roll it up and shove it up near the top of the keg, between the dip tube and the keg wall. When you drink about a gallon of your beer, the hops will be suspended above the beer preventing over-exposure. I've done this at least a dozen times with great results.


7

You can get away with juggling the CO2 between the kegs. But it quickly becomes a pain. (I did it for a short time before building a keezer.) If the carb/dispense pressure is going to be the same for most of your kegs, then you just need a way to split the CO2 from your regulator to multiple lines. You can use a Wye, or better, a manifold. If you see ...


7

CO2 is less readily absorbed by warm liquids. Therefore, CO2 in solution comes out of solution when you warm the beer. Whenever it works for you. The warmer the beer is stored though, the sooner you should try to cool it back down. Warmer storage promotes faster aging. For me, the point where I want to start cooling it down again starts at about 80F. ...


6

There is a thing called a SureScreen that can slip over the dip tube of the keg so you can dry hop in the keg. Here's the description from Northern Brewer: "The SureScreen is a welded stainless steel screen that slips onto your racking cane or keg dip tube and filters out fruit or dry hops from the fermenter or whole hops and trub from the kettle. Also ...


6

It makes absolutely no difference in the quality of the beer which way you do it. I'd tend to do it in the keg for the reasons you mention. You can carb it and have it ready to serve when it's done conditioning.


5

Man your question is the answer. You described it exactly how I would do it. I have done it this way in the past with homebrew beer and it works fine. I would suggest two mods to your process. Don't bother with the bottling wand and its a source of turbulance that will help generate more foam. Just go with a straight shot of tubing from the tap to the ...


5

Replacing the seals is usually a good idea. Seal Kits are inexpensive. A good how-to on replacing seals is helpful. The one tricky bit about o-rings is that certain types work best with certain kegs. This is especially true of the o-rings that sit between the dip tubes and the in/out ports. With the right o-rings, you really don't have to apply that much ...


5

As long as all of seals are good, it should hold pressure indefinitely.


5

As long as you aren't using air purged cask type "kegs" you'll be fine. Disconnecting a keg from the hook up seals the keg from the outside air, and contains the pressure already applied. Assuming you're using the proper pressure to dispense, the beer's carbonation level will remain the same. If the beer is unfiltered, or has been naturally carbonated, ...


5

At beer pressures, a keg cannot explode. It's designed to take much more pressure - rated to around 120-130 psi. Even at failure, the seals will fail rather than the chamber itself. Failing at standard beer pressures will be as a leak (pinhole or crack). Which isn't to say they can't explode. It's a sealed pressurized vessel - so it could explode or ...


5

I can think of a couple reasons. One is that the beer is over carbonated...maybe not literally, but it indicates your system may be out of balance. The other reason would be if you had a long line from the keg to the tap. The line is warmer and the CO2 comes out of solution in the line.


4

You may be better off using corny kegs as a secondary fermenter. (If you transfer.) I use them as brite tanks, clarifying my beer a week before serving. There is no risk of krausen explosion You can naturally carbonate You can transfer to the serving keg under pressure No worry of clogging your dip tube Don't need to trim the dip tube. Most stories I hear ...


4

A strong, hot solution of baking soda and water is very effective at removing odors. Rubber parts should be replaced.


4

1.) no need to keep the tank hooked up. The keg will retain pressure 2.) No problem 3.) yep. Just make sure it's tightly sealed! 4.) if there's no sediment in the keg, an hour or 2 will be fine. Otherwise, maybe overnight


4

Assuming you keep the beer under CO2 and purged the oxygen from the keg, it will keep quite a while. Several months at the very least, and it could be years. However, if you serve it "real ale" style without CO2 you are limited to a few days in peak condition.


4

Look into "spunding valves", either to buy or DIY. Often used for natural carbonation, but it could be used to control primary fermentation pressure, as you suggest.


4

I've done just this for my last 30 batches or so. It's lovely, and I see no reason to go back. I fill the corny to the weld line, bubble some oxygen up through the liquid diptube, and then connect my spunding valve to the gas connect. The spunding valve is just a pressure gauge and an adjustable pressure relief valve attached to a 1/4" stainless tee. To ...


4

No, it makes no difference - the CO2 is already liquid, and the difference between fridge and room temperature doesn't make any significant difference. When the CO2 comes out of the tank and converts to gas, it becomes much colder - again, significantly more colder than the difference between fridge and room temp. So again, no real difference. Where is ...


4

By poppet do you mean the little springy thing inside of the keg post or do you mean the outer keg post itself? I'll try to answer both. I have ruined a few poppets by forcing them out with a screw driver and had to replace. The replacement poppets do not stick in as hard and normally fall right out. For cleaning I go with a long soak in PBW then StarSan ...


3

Tour as many of your local breweries as possible. Sometimes kegs get damaged with cracks in the neck area. I have asked in been offered to let me buy these types of kegs from this source in the past. Your local package store may offer you the same thing. Supposedly, you can cruise local scrap yards for kegs. But the cost of stainless these days has ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible