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12

Proteins are one of the primary constituents of hot break. Some of these proteins are known as haze active (HA) and negatively affect beer clarity (they make yer beer cloudy). The proteins are complex molecules folded up into three-dimensional structures that give them a positive charge. Irish moss (Chondrus crispus) is negatively charged. When present ...


10

Ideally when using irish moss, very little of it should end up in the fermentor. It's a good idea to let the boil settle for 10-15 minutes after flameout so that the moss and the proteins it's attracted have time to fall to the bottom of the kettle. But even if it does make it to the fermentor, it won't have any significant affect on the yeast: The irish ...


8

Irish moss is added to the boil for the last 10-15 minutes. It acts as a clarifying agent by attracting proteins and other solids in the wort, causing them to form larger particles that are more easily removed and/or flocculate out. Consequently, it reduces chill haze in the beer later on. Although it doesn't exactly smell pleasant by itself, it doesn't add ...


7

Irish moss is a dried, dead product (seaweed), which if kept in a air-tight jar out of sunlight will last pretty much indefinitely. I'm using mine that I bought 4 years ago and the wort still clears nicely. Some other anecdotal evidence, david_42, senior member on HBT writes Well, I'm about half way though a 4 oz bag after 6 years. Seems to be doing the ...


6

I used Irish moss for many years before switching to whirlfloc. But I think that was an availability thing more than anything else. Irish Moss: PRO- Works great everytime. PRO- Cheap PRO- easily scaleable to any size batch CON- Need to measure it out Whirlfloc: PRO- Works great everytime. I found it was even mildly better that IM, but that's tough to call. ...


6

Most organic products are not 100% organic. Compare organic carrots to organic carrot cake. The FDA or USDA has allowed that a small percentage of the ingredients not be organic as long as the primary and majority ingredients are organic. There are several organic beers out there that don't use all organic hops, yet the still retain the organic label. I ...


6

Irish moss works on the proteins in the beer. It has a negative charge, which binds the proteins which are positively charged. Although some yeast might have gotten trapped as the proteins fell out it wouldn't be enough to keep the beer from carbing. It will have no direct affect on the yeast.


5

I wouldn't even bother with Irish moss for a small batch size. If you are using a one gallon fermentor you should be able to find space for it in the fridge when its done. Cold crashing for a week or so would be more effective than irish moss anyway.


4

Just add 1/4 tsp or 1g of what you have. Irish moss is a fining - it helps draw together proteins in the boil, and is primarily added to improve clarity, but it can also provide a finer head. It's not critical how much you use - some brewers use 1/4 tsp per 5 gallons, others 1 tsp. The moss doesn't have to be sterile - anything added to the boil is quickly ...


4

I have some that is about 16 years old. I added it to a test sample of mead (the dregs that were left over after moving the must to a secondary fermenter). It clarified well and does not appear to affect the taste. I don't know how it will change with t


4

Irish moss is available at any homebrew supply outlet, often in small bottles with the instructions right on the label. Use 1 tsp. per 5 gallons of beer at the last 15-20 minutes of the boil. It will not affect the flavor of the beer with such a low dosage, assuming you're not harvesting it yourself. Its purpose is to latch onto proteins in the beer and ...


3

From these documents: PDF1 PDF2 Store in cool conditions, away from direct sunlight Keep containers sealed when not in use Maximum storage temperature - 30°C Recommended storage temperature - 10 to 15°C Minimum storage temperature - Not applicable The shelf life at the recommended storage temperature is 2 years from date of manufacture Increasing the ...


3

The answer is that the active ingredient, carageenan, is said to denature by hydrolization at low pH (especially if combined with high temps) before it has gelled, but it is hard to find citeable sources on the Internet. Carageenan typically comes from seaweed, including the commonly-named Irish Moss. Most forms of carageenan are not soluble in water at ...


3

The flakes look a little large (this may or may not be a matter of perspective), but past that, I'd say it's perfectly fine to use. Add one teaspoon per 5-gallon batch at the last 15 minutes. Before adding it, I would suggest crushing it down just a bit further, either via a rolling pin, chopping, or using a coffee grinder (specifically re-purposed for ...


3

The Wikipedia article on carrageenan outlines a number of peer reviewed animal studies, the results of which are mixed with some researchers claiming carrageenan poses no health concerns, while others assert that it promotes gastrointestinal tract inflammation and increased incidence of tumours. This study found no correlation between dietary carrageenan ...


2

No. The purpose of Irish Moss is to remove particulate matter from your beer. I wouldn't bother trying to use a precise amount. Use half of what you would normally use and call it good. All Irish Moss does is gelatinize and the gelatin captures small particles to help clear the beer during the cooling phase. It doesn't and shouldn't taste or smell like ...


2

If you brew extract, use 1/4 tsp. 15 min. before the end of the boil. If you brew all grain, use 1 tsp. for 15 min. Rehydration is not essential, but it will make it a bit more effective.


2

Al Korzonas did some tests years back about using Irish moss. His findings were that you should use 1/4 tsp. in extract beers and 1 tsp. in all grain beers. The reason for using less in extract beers is due to the processing of the extract. For best results, rehydrate the Irish moss in a little water for an hour or so before using it.


1

Adding irish moss too early to the boil will actually cause the coagulated proteins to break apart after binding together, negating the purpose of using irish moss. Ten minutes would be fine, but any shorter and you risk not giving the irish moss sufficient time to bind the proteins together. As an aside, adding irish moss will help with clarity, but ...


1

I am no scientist, but I would think that since Irish Moss is only used as a coagulant and precipitant in brewing that the amount retained in the beer after racking would be significantly less than say ice cream, where it is used as a gelling agent.


1

Irish moss is a protein coagulator, as a result it is not a primary determinant of yeast based haze. Yeast remaining in suspension is where a good hefe gets its haze from. Therefore, adding irish moss will not clear your hefe up much at all. If you do add irish moss it will simply help remove some of the cold break, which is the protein source where irish ...


1

Skip the moss in my opinion. this style is intended to be hazy and you wouldn't want to over-clear it. Clarity is also somewhat overrated in my opinion so take it with a grain of salt. All of the Hefe's I've done have not used moss and have come out looking excellent (just enough haze in the glass to look proper).


1

Check out Whirfloc, an alternative to Irish moss. 1/2 - 1 tablet 15 min left in the boil should help your cold break flocculate.


1

Yeast itself is organic. The medium it's grown in may not be, but you;d have to contact the yeast manufacturer to know.



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