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I have seen a lot of times that there is a layer of protection, when the ferment is going strong, the pressure of the bubbles actually push any contaminants out of the stopper hole. The layer of foam created by the ferment is also a protection from contaminants. My airlock had the ferment bubbling into the airlock, so I had to take it off and clean it, and ...


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You shouldn't be concerned. When you removed the stopper, you didn't allow it to come into contact with a non-sterile (potentially bacteria-ridden) surface, so there was no potential for transfer of bacteria onto it (other than contact with the air, which does not pose a significant risk).


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As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time.


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No, you don't need to worry about contamination based on what you describe.


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Looks pretty reasonable, although as Ryan noted, 2 oz. Columbus at 60 minutes will be quite bitter. Personally, I find that boiling Columbus for more than 30 minutes results in a harsh bitterness that lingers far too long on my tongue. (I wake up tasting it the next day.) For that reason, I no longer use Columbus for bittering. I generally stick with Magnum ...


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Hey experimenting is half the fun of brewing! If you keep good notes on recipes and final product you can really start to understand what works together and produce better and better beer. Without knowing what your grain bill I would say this looks a little aggressive. As a reference, let's say you were shooting for a 1.065 o.g. (6.5% ish) your current hop ...


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I cold crash (and fine with gelatin) at 30F for two or three days before kegging. I have found that 30F for two days clears my beer better than weeks at 38F in my refrigerator. If you plan to bottle the beer, you might fear that you'll drop too much yeast out, leaving you with too little yeast to carbonate the beer. That isn't a concern. Plenty of beer has ...


2

Yes. You'll likely be fully fermented within 1 week, if you have a healthy pitch of yeast. Two weeks should be more than enough. Gravity readings are your best option to understanding fermentation/attenuation, here.


4

In my opinion a "secondary" should be viewed as a tool. A potentially useful tool, but best used by someone who really has a grip of their brewing process and using it for a very specific purpose. I agree with Palmer, dont chase what the big brewers do, they have different issues then homebrewers. I would definitely suggest dry hopping in your primary vessel ...


4

It's not contradictory so much as it's all valid. :) To answer the titular question: yes, you can dry-hop in primary. Long-term aging is really the only reason to rack to secondary. Dry-hopping, fruit additions, &c. can all happen in primary just fine. Anything that happens w/in 6 months can happen in one vessel (primary) or two (primary and secondary). ...


1

As they say: Do Not Fear The Bug! :) Your brewery will not get infected if you brew this beer. All plastic equipment used in the brewing (post boil) should be considered infected and should never be used with a clean beer ever again. Mark the hoses/spoons to indicated that they are a bio-hazard :p Plastic fermenters count for the previous rule, but they ...


2

Oak barrels also let a bit of oxygen in. Apparently you can recreate this with on of those soft orange carboy caps - they are more porous to oxygen than others. Standard precautions for Brett are to keep the soft parts separate from you other beers. But Brett isn't that hard to kill, proper sanitation should be enough. And if any fruit grows near your ...


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About the only times I use a secondary any more are when I'm adding more fermentables (like fruit) or when I dry hop. There are interactions between they yeast and dry hops that can result in a really "flowery" quality to the beer due to an increase in geraniol. You don't have to worry about off flavors due to yeast. That's a homebrew myth carried over ...


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The aim of dry-hopping is to get as much of the essential oils of the hop into your beer without extracting bitterness and without driving the volatile compounds off through heat, ie during the boil. So its simply a matter of adding hops to the beer when its cool enough. I think your question is mainly concerned with the practicalities of cleanly siphoning ...


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When would you recommend throwing the hops in since i wont be able to extract them? For 1 or 2 weeks before you bottle. I am going to filter on my racking cane when i siphon into bottling bucket. Can I just toss them in, and rack on top of them from the primary? You can if you want to. Should I wait until the last week in the secondary? Should I rack ...


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It isn't clear from your post what your fermentation schedule is, but it seems like you plan to allow primary fermentation to finish and then rack to a secondary vessel for two weeks. If that's your schedule, then your questions are (1) how long should you dry hop and (2) how should you add the hops to the vessel? The answer to the first question is, "It ...



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