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13

Here is a pretty useful chart of different types of hops and the flavors they tend to impart on beer. http://zekeshore.com/hops_v1.12.png Things change depending on year and growing location, as well as hop style, but this is a good general idea.


10

Per its name, Citra is also a good citrus-y variety. If you want to know what it adds, compare a Sierra Nevada pale ale (Cascade) to a Sierra Nevada Torpedo IPA (dry-hopped with Citra).


10

Hop Primer: Hops have two purposes in beer*: bittering, and hops flavor/aroma. The key thing is that when your'e boiling hops in hot wort, the flavor/aroma compounds will get boiled off. As such, hops added early in the boil won't contribute much to a hoppy flavor, since they spend more time boiling- hence why they're called 'bittering hops'. Hops added ...


9

What you're tasting is the distinct flavor of west-coast hops. Most people liken it to a citrus, grapefruit, or sometimes orange peel aroma and flavor. You might be getting guava from the combination of tangy hops and a sweet, sugar-cookie base from the malt. Racer 5 uses Centennial, Chinook, Cascade, and Columbus hops. I've heard that Islander IPA uses ...


8

First of all, there is no rule about time for beers. The beer makes its own schedule. In terms of aging, there are no rules either. The beer is ready when it tastes ready to you. I prefer IPAs without a lot of age on them so that the hop character remains fresh. But you should try one occasionally and see what you think.


8

The hop pellets are not supposed to dissolve into your wort. Rather, the boiling isomerizes the alpha acids in the hops (and the isomerized alpha acids will dissolve into the wort), giving the wort its intended bitterness. However, it is totally normal to get an "oil slick", film or foam of hops on top of the boiling wort. Hops have three purposes: ...


7

You don't need to do anything to sanitize the hops. By the time your beer is going into a secondary, the alcohol and pH make it very resistant to infections. Just make sure to use a fine mesh bag. I didn't do that during my first attempt at dry hopping and it was almost impossible to get all of the hop particles out of the finished beer :)


7

Cascade hops have a grapefruit aroma, and Amarillo, orange. Those are the stronngest citrussy hops I know of. I'd imagine you get most of the citrus flavour & aroma out of large amounts of late-boil, finishing, and dry hops.


7

Referring to the BJCP Style Guidelines, the following is true: English Pale Ales (ESBs): 25-50 IBUs American Pale Ales: 20-40 IBUs IPAs: 40-60 IBUs for English, 40-70 IBUs for American, 60-120 IBUs for Imperial IPAs Based on this, the answer to your question should be in the 40+ IBU range to differentiate bitterness between pale ales and IPAs. Bear in ...


6

First, for an IPA, that recipe looks a little low on the late hop additions for flavor and aroma for modern US-style IPA. Did you add the 1 oz of cascade as a dry hop called for in the recipe? Their recipe page has it listed on the same line with the yeast rather than the next line, and maybe you missed it; I know I missed it on the first read through. If ...


6

As a homebrewer, pretty much all of your beers will be "unfiltered". You can take steps to make them even more unfiltered, but pretty much, you'll always be there. Most production breweries filter their beers through a variety of methods. When they make an unfiltered beer, they just skip those steps. The result is often a grainier beer, something with more ...


6

Well, wait another week. Sometimes it can be slow. Assuming that's not the problem, the first suggestion would be to gently swirl the bottles individually to try and rouse some yeast. Cold crashing shouldn't have knocked them all out of suspension. It may have taken some of them out, but there still should be plenty to carb. Swirl, wait a week, and open ...


6

Yes. A simple base recipe to think about is just this: Base malt, 90-95%: For the alcohol ;-) Crystal malt, 5-10%: Add a little sweetness and malty, caramelly characteristic, but not too much! Hops: Some nice American hops based off of your preferred beers Yeast: American ale yeast, for a cleaner finish characteristic of American IPAs This is a very ...


6

It was a lucky guess. There is nothing in that grist bill specific to an IPA. AAMOF, it's NOT an IPA! The OG is too low, for one thing. The recipe even calls itself a pale ale, not an IPA. As to what makes an IPA an IPA, the best ROT is the BU:GU ratio. An IPA will usually be in the 1.060-1.075 OG range and have at least a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.


5

Was the bitterness you got what you expected? If not, you might need more sulfate in your water. If you need more hop flavor, you can try either first wort hopping or increasing the amount of hops you use at 10-20 min. before flameout. For more hop aroma, dry hopping is da bomb!


5

I'm assuming that your recipe is all-grain from some of your previous questions, but if it is an extract recipe you probably don't need to worry since most of the DMS boiled off. A little over a month ago I made a hefe (from extract) and only had a 15 minute boil time. Neither me, nor anyone who has tasted it can detect any DMS. If it's all-grain, what ...


5

Keep in mind that published "standards" have little to do with commercial beer. The BJCP guidelines that most of us know are are for comparing one beer to another in a homebrew comp. They have little to no bearing on the commercial beer world, where the brewers can call their beers whatever they like and brew them however they want to. So, there's really ...


5

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time.


4

I wasn't aware that Fullers made an IPA. I couldn't find it at the Fullers website. Fullers being a UK based brewery I'd suggest looking into East Kent Goldings hops, and Fuggles hops. Both are UK varieties used in many English style ales.


4

Wow, that average pH is low compared to my water just over here in the Pittsburgh suburbs. Mine is 8.3. Your water is pretty neutral, mine is alkaline. Anyways, here's my suggestion: Don't adjust your water this time. Water adjustment is a pretty technical topic and if you want to start doing it, be prepared to experiment. I recently switched to all ...


4

I have never counted bubbles - I presume you are referring to an airlock. Would you not be better using a hydrometer to measure the gravity to determine whether it is the right time to transfer to secondary? Perhaps a few degrees above your predicted final gravity. Say, 1012 - 1014. This might be a bit more empirical than bubbles, for as you rightly say, ...


4

If you got consistent hydrometer readings over several successive days then yes, go ahead and bottle. 3+ weeks in the fermenter sounds like more than sufficient time for your IPA. By the way, the bubble rate is not an accurate way of measuring fermentation activity. Bubbles can be produced by changes in ambient temperature and by simply walking past your ...


4

Your brew will definite taste salty with that quantity of minerals added. I would use a third of that amount. 150ppm calcium and 250ppm sulphates is really the upper limit of what you can comfortably use in the beer, and you will still taste a little salt up front, but often it goes with the style. Here are some guidelines from the HBT wiki, ...


4

You don't need a starter since you're pitching to 1/4 batch size that a whitelabs vial is good for. Normally you'd use 2-4 vials for a 20 liter batch, depending upon gravity, so that's equivalent to 1/2 to 1 a vial for a 5 liter batch. For the detailed figures, see Always making a starter vs. following package description. One way to know the OG prior to ...


4

The earlier in the process you add it, the more flavor you'll lose. The aroma will be boiled off or driven off by CO2 during fermentation. Boiling might extract flavor, but I'm guessing. no idea Add both


4

The key piece that's missing here is extraction efficiency - how much sugar you can get out of the grains. In the calculator, it's set at 80%, but it's doubtful you got that just from steeping and lautering in a pot. You typically need continual recirculation to get 80%+. With my old equipment (a large cooler with a hand-made series of pipes with slits.) I ...


4

The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) makes an attempt to describe styles such as this. One such style is IPA (grouped into 3 subcategories: English IPA, American IPA, and Imperial IPA). Have a look: http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/style14.php You're right that the hop character defines the IPA style. However, a traditional IPA has some restrictions on ...


4

While some claim that the addition of hops to their beer have contributed to contamination, it is quite rare considering how hops are anti-microbial in nature. While not having any way of confirming it, I would suspect contamination on those situations occurred due to some other unsanitary practice (didn't sanitize the bag, weights, or it was already ...


4

It's not contradictory so much as it's all valid. :) To answer the titular question: yes, you can dry-hop in primary. Long-term aging is really the only reason to rack to secondary. Dry-hopping, fruit additions, &c. can all happen in primary just fine. Anything that happens w/in 6 months can happen in one vessel (primary) or two (primary and secondary). ...


4

In my opinion a "secondary" should be viewed as a tool. A potentially useful tool, but best used by someone who really has a grip of their brewing process and using it for a very specific purpose. I agree with Palmer, dont chase what the big brewers do, they have different issues then homebrewers. I would definitely suggest dry hopping in your primary vessel ...



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