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14

Yeast produce different flavors during the various stages of their lifecycle. Overpitching shortens or skips their "growth" phase (maybe a better name is "division" or "budding"). The bulk of a beer's esters are produced during this initial stage, so missing out on a fully-developed life cycle robs an ale of this often desirable quality. A by-product of ...


13

AFAIK, there are no benefits. They're all basically the same. Brewing sugar is corn sugar and while there may be chemical differences between it and other types of sugar, the end result in your beer will be indistinguishable. Sugars like piloncillo or demarara can add a bit of flavor, but the result of adding corn, cane, beet, or brown sugar are pretty ...


12

When calculating sugars used in the wort, how much sugar does honey contain? Is it closer to dry malt extracts, raw cane sugar, dextrose? Honey is loaded with fermentable sugar (think mead...), though not as much as malt extracts. There are "adjuncts" within the honey as well. But you can yet a near-even yield from honey as you could from dry ...


12

Chez, you're in luck. I just wrapped up a double 1-gallon experiment with these two malts. Had the brew-bug one day & two 55 pound sacks of malt. My experiment was simple. I made gallon batches of 1.040 OG beer solely from each malt. Hopping was kept to a single 60 minute addition of about 20 IBUs. I selected a clean ale yeast and fermented cool to ...


10

Growing and using your own hops exclusively presents two definite setbacks in brewing: variety and proportions. When you grow your own, you're generally limited to a single variety of hops which limits the hop flavors in the beers you make. Some hops contain a lot of alpha acids are are great as bittering hops (e.g. magnum), while others impart things such ...


10

This isn't quite what you're asking. I don't think chili peppers have enough sugars in them to produce a strong enough fermentation on their own. I made a chili-pepper beer, which was absolutely fantastic. I made a simple, low-bitterness beer. After fermentation was complete, I racked into a secondary and added 4 types of dried, frozen chilies. I sampled ...


10

Based on a standard Pilsner Malt, for Vienna the barley gets watered some more (44-46% water instead of 42-46%). Also the roasting is slightly higher at 90°C instead of 80-85°C. Munich is made with still more water (up to 47%) and temepratures up to 110°C. Water and higher temperatures lead to a more pronounced Maillard-Reaction and hence formation of darker ...


10

It really depends on what you're after. Traditionally, dried bitter orange peel is added late in the boil for bitterness. Dried or fresh sweet orange peel can be added late in the boil for a bit of flavor, and fresh sweet orange peel can be added to the secondary for aroma. So, you need to think about and define what it is you want the orange peel to do ...


9

There's probably a reason you haven't heard of people using either kiwi or papaya in brewing. Kiwi, papaya, pineapple, melon, and fig all contain enzymes (proteases) that affect proteins. Harold McGee's On Food and Cooking treats this subject. Papaya has long been used as a meat tenderizer, albeit an imperfect one. The McGee piece addresses mainly these ...


8

Torrified Wheat has been heat treated (kind of "popped")to break the cellular structure, allowing for rapid hydration and allows malt enzymes to more completely attack the starches and protein. Torrified Wheat can be used in place of raw wheat in Belgian style Wit-Beers, also very good for adding body and head, especially to English ales. Since it has not ...


7

There is satisfaction, and frustration, in growing hops. I personally have 6 hop varieties growing. Problems: variable yields. Your local weather will have a huge effect on what variety you can grow, and what yield you get. Some sources list between 1/2 to 2 pounds of dried hops per vine. I've never been able to get anywhere near that, even though my ...


7

It's reasonable to assume that something happens in the process of evaporating down to syrup or DME, and that that something differs from a wort made fresh by mashing. From what I've read, it's a combination of sweetness from under-attenuation, and off flavors from the production/storage of syrup. I've not really identified a particular flavor that I ...


7

Adding some wheat to the recipe can give some good body and head retention. There are a bunch of other methods as well. Check out this BrewWiki article on Head Retention. The main methods are: The use of body and head enhancing malts such as crystal, wheat, or carafoam The altering of the mash schedule to enhance head retaining proteins The use of heading ...


7

In the pubs the creamy nead is achieved through the CO2/Nitrigen gas mix as mentioned already. It is also achieved by using a stout tap. A stout tap is similar in all respects to a regular tap, however the one significant difference is that inserted into the tap is a small disk that diffuses the beer through a number of small holes around the perimeter of ...


7

I would maybe add your hottest pepper to the boil. That way you aren't adding alot of vegetal matter to the boil. Sort if like using a high alpha hop. Then, I'd make a relish or mash of your less intense peppers and add that in secondary. Sort of like dry hopping. I would also consider serving this beer out of some poblanos if you can find some big ...


7

As alcohol levels rise in a beer, eventually you can taste it. There is just no way around that part. However as a brewer you do have control over some of the less desirable tasting higher order (molecularly complex) alcohols. The best way to control the levels of these types of flavors is to pitch plenty of yeast, ferment on the cooler side (that also ...


6

Hop utilization - the amount of acid bitterness extracted from hops - is greatly affected by the gravity of the boil, or the concentration of sugars in the boiling wort. The more concentrated the sugars, the less the hops will be utilized. If you are trying to attain a certain level of HBUs in your recipe, you can do one of two things - go with a more ...


6

I can only answer the first part of your question. The sugars in honey vary depending on the type. If you really want to know the contributions you should make a measurement. Specific gravity is a measure of points per pound per gallon (ppg). All you need do is take a pound of honey, add pure water until you have a gallon and measure with a hydrometer. ...


6

I've done two red ales so far. In the first I used a combination of Weyermann Carared (http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-ingredients/grain-malts/caramel-malts/weyermann-carared.html) and Simpsons Dark Crystal (http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-ingredients/grain-malts/caramel-malts/simpsons-dark-crystal.html) about half a pound of ...


6

I've always just added chilies straight to the secondary. I've always used roasted anaheim peppers that i just toss into secondary, and never had any problems with infection or anything. They don't add a lot of heat though, if that's what your looking for. Then again, they're really mild. They contributed some incredible flavor though. I did about 5 ...


6

Most organic products are not 100% organic. Compare organic carrots to organic carrot cake. The FDA or USDA has allowed that a small percentage of the ingredients not be organic as long as the primary and majority ingredients are organic. There are several organic beers out there that don't use all organic hops, yet the still retain the organic label. I ...


6

Galena is an US bittering hop, 11-14% AA described as "citrusy. fruity/black-currant similar to Bullion". Sticklebract is a New Zealand dual-purpose hop, 10.5-14.5% AA, described as "high selinine content and a piney, citrusy aroma".


6

Ordinary Bitter, Mild, Dry Stout, Irish Red. These styles are generally lower OG and use little hops. The ABVs are generally under 5.5%. And these four styles all use the same base malt. Therefore you can maximize your savings purchasing a full sack of base malt. After that you can just get specialty malts as needed; and these styles provide a good ...


6

Brewing is a lot like cooking. Sometimes your recipe calls for a very simple collection of ingredients (think good Italian food). These types of recipes can call for just 1 or 2 malts, and can be quite delicious. Pilsners, Munich Dunkels, Scotch Ales, some British Ales, simple Belgians, Wheats and more are all styles that can be made with a single type of ...


5

Considering that hops are from the same family (Cannabaceae) as marijuana and hemp, that's not as outrageous as it may seem. Summit hops in particular, have an intensely 'weedy' aroma. I had an all Summit IPA shortly after the hop was introduced and it smelled (and tasted a bit) like bong water.


5

I have done this with good results in the past. There is no reason at all to not try yeast combinations. Yeast is just another ingredient for the most part. Combining two strains to get a little of both character certainly adds complexity to the brew. I have found that when combining something like WLP001 with other strains, you can tone-down the other ...


5

I used Irish moss for many years before switching to whirlfloc. But I think that was an availability thing more than anything else. Irish Moss: PRO- Works great everytime. PRO- Cheap PRO- easily scaleable to any size batch CON- Need to measure it out Whirlfloc: PRO- Works great everytime. I found it was even mildly better that IM, but that's tough to call. ...


5

I've seen a great picture of an oak table leg sticking out the top of a carboy. Wish I could find it. BYO covered this question in depth. So I won't plagiarize everything here. Oak Essence and Powder Oak Chips Oak Cubes Staves and Spirals


5

I received a couple hundred pounds of free base malt a few years ago and used it in a lot of different styles of beer. What I found is that it did fine in beers that had a higher percentage of specialty grains or was less malt focused. Styles like American barley wine, American Stout, IPA, and Blond ales it seemed to work well because it just needed to ...


5

You can work out the approximate amount of calories if you think about what the major contributors to the brew are. Calories will come from carbohydrates (in the form of dissolved sugars) and alcohol (ethanol). Ethanol has 7 kcal/g, so assuming an approximate density of 1 g / ml (i.e. water)* you can get the alcohol contribution from the alcohol by volume ...



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