Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


7

The best way to get the turkey baster out with the least consequences on your wort is to wait until the beer is finished fermenting, and then just dump it out after the beer has been racked away. Whatever contamination was going to happen has already happened (hopefully you sanitized the turkey baster). Trying to fish out the turkey baster is going to be ...


3

Another thing to consider along with the wooden spoon is if you grind your grains in the same room as you brew. Lactobacillus comes from the grains and while grinding or even pouring out of the bag, tiny grain particles can float in the air for a while like dust. These small particles can then find their way into your cooled wort or fermentation vessel. ...


3

Yep, that's definitely an infection. It's likely that either the carboy had some unwanted critters lying in wait, or something got into the wort (e.g. fruit flies, missing the bung). Did you sanitize your carboy before pouring wort into it? Sometimes freak accidents do happen, but the temperature would have nothing to do with the possibility of an ...


3

Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


3

Smell: Smells like beer. Look: Looks like beer. Taste: Tastes like beer. Verdict: It's beer! I think the issue here was paranoia of using a new sanitiser and tech. The Krausen looked to me like colony of 'something' floating on clear head, instead of all the foam looking brown and Krausen like.


2

Dry hopping does not on its own create the conditions you describe, which sound very much like a pellicle.


2

If it's a style suited to souring, maybe it'll end up interesting… :S But you left un-sterilized sugar-water alone for 6 days. Bacteria reproduce really fast, much faster than yeast actually, but the side-effects of a healthy pitch of yeast usually crowd them out. I don't have high hopes. If you're limited on fermenter space, dump it and get the next ...


1

If you bottle the beer under the pellicle, make sure you open one every now and then to check for gushers. If you get them, pitch it all--otherwise you may end up with bottle bombs. Or, put that in a glass carboy and leave it in a closet for a year or two. Maybe it will turn into a good sour. You can always throw it out later.


1

By this time you will probably need to let it sit in there. If it's floating near the top, I've gotten things out of carboys with chop sticks before.


1

Depending on how wide the small end of the baster is, I'd consider using a wire coat-hanger, with a very slight hook on the end. Sterilize it by curling it up, and boiling it in a sauce pan full of water for a couple of minutes, using a star-san soaked rag to grab hold and straighten it to fish around for it. On the other hand, perhaps just leave it until ...


1

Don't panic. Taste the beer. If it tastes like beer, it's probably ok. If it doesn't taste like beer, but not bad, you can do a couple of things. ONE: do nothing, bottle it, and wait to see how it matures. TWO: drop 2-3 campden tablets to sterilize the beer, then prime and bottle. THREE: Pasteurize, then add a little more malt and repitch with some ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible