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9

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


4

An infection will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. To be sure ...


3

Another thing to consider along with the wooden spoon is if you grind your grains in the same room as you brew. Lactobacillus comes from the grains and while grinding or even pouring out of the bag, tiny grain particles can float in the air for a while like dust. These small particles can then find their way into your cooled wort or fermentation vessel. ...


3

Yep, that's definitely an infection. It's likely that either the carboy had some unwanted critters lying in wait, or something got into the wort (e.g. fruit flies, missing the bung). Did you sanitize your carboy before pouring wort into it? Sometimes freak accidents do happen, but the temperature would have nothing to do with the possibility of an ...


2

Your beer will most probably not be infected. Yeast are quite aggressive at this point in the fermentation and will kill any bugs that fell in. I use vodka in my airlock. It guarantees that no bugs will get into my beer! :) I have used my sanitization solution before. Just fill your airlock to the line (usually about halfway) and you are good. Another ...


2

If you took a specific gravity reading before you bottled and were confident that it was at final gravity, de-gas a sample and take another gravity reading now. If it's the same, it's over-carbonated. If it's noticeably lower, then some other wild yeast or bacteria else has likely got a hold of it.


1

Sour, astringent and vinegary. Definitely sounds like an infection. Lactic and acetic acid also both have higher specific gravity than water or alcohol, so that's probably why your gravity went up between weeks two and three. Lost cause? I don't know, can you stand to drink it? If not, it's certainly not going to get any better with time. What is your ...


1

What was the OG reading? What was the FG reading? If these measurements are within the expected boundaries of your yeast strain and fermentation has stopped, then it is probably not infected. Remember, green (un-aged), un-carbonated beer will taste a bit different than the finished product. Dumping a batch should be the last resort. Give it time to mellow. ...



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