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6

QUICK TIP: Did you check with a hydrometer before you pitched? The golden rule with determining fermentation is "Trust your hydrometer; Almost everything else will lie to you" - Bubbling airlock and foam on the top of the wort can all have other causes, while a drop in specific gravity is only caused by conversion of the sugars in the wort to alcohol. ...


5

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time.


4

An infection will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. To be sure ...


4

I have had something similar, I was brewing a Bohemian Pilsner Ale and the yeast formed tennis ball sized clumps on the top of the beer! I freaked out! But I recited the Papazian mantra and kegged the beer. That beer ended up being one my best beers ever. Some yeasts (S04 in my case) sometimes flocculate, but in the process still have so much CO2 that they ...


3

Yeast with a high floculation rate will do this, they usually break off the bottom and float up from trapped c02. Beer looks really clear, good job. When you rack to secondary, go ahead and let the floaters suck into the secondary, usually this is enough to break them up and let them settle. If you don't mind the extra loss you can leave them behind. ...


3

I have never done that, but I base my answer on information about acetobacter on Wikipedia. The growth of Acetobacter in wine can be suppressed through effective sanitation, by complete exclusion of air from wine in storage, and by the use of moderate amounts of sulfur dioxide in the wine as a preservative. I suppose it can be done, taking the ...


3

No, you don't need to worry about contamination based on what you describe.


2

Although it is possible to get dissolved gasses out of liquids by heating them, making it look like there is fermentation, there really shouldn't be much gas dissolved in a recently boiled wort. Instead I think you have done a 'forced wort test' by delaying your pitch. The test is simply: make wort, don't add yeast, wait until something happens ...


2

Your beer will most probably not be infected. Yeast are quite aggressive at this point in the fermentation and will kill any bugs that fell in. I use vodka in my airlock. It guarantees that no bugs will get into my beer! :) I have used my sanitization solution before. Just fill your airlock to the line (usually about halfway) and you are good. Another ...


2

Most likely a wild yeast infection which could easily contain some of those strains and have the potential to be a positive in a Berliner, or not...(plastic, bandaid, and phenolic flavors possible). It does Look like a pellicle for sure! I would say if it smells rancid don't try it, if it taste terrible don't drink it, that's the best advice given to me on ...


2

The cider / vinegar smell is normal, it is acetaldehyde and is a normal byproduct of fermentation. But it's a temporary byproduct, the yeast will consume it to recover NAD+ from NADH after all oxygen has been gone for a while. If I recall correctly, even acetobacter needs oxygen to actually make vinegar. So the problem is apparently oxygen more than ...


1

From the picture it looks like normal yeast clumps to me. Sometimes you get dried krausen falling back in the beer and it doesn't really dissolve and settle out. Its hard to say looking at an internet picture, but that's what it looks like to me.



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