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5

As jsled says you have no worries. You are doing the right things, not touching it or putting it down. If just for a few seconds to check on the brew you'll be fine, also you will gain experience regarding how your brew evolves over time.


4

An infection will usually make a ring right at the surface of the wort/must etc. Anything above the liquid would have come from the initial fermentation foam (or maybe from getting something in the neck of the bottling when filling, such as dry yeast). Mead will generate a little foam at the beginnning, so it's probably nothing to worry about. To be sure ...


3

No, you don't need to worry about contamination based on what you describe.


2

Your beer will most probably not be infected. Yeast are quite aggressive at this point in the fermentation and will kill any bugs that fell in. I use vodka in my airlock. It guarantees that no bugs will get into my beer! :) I have used my sanitization solution before. Just fill your airlock to the line (usually about halfway) and you are good. Another ...


2

If you took a specific gravity reading before you bottled and were confident that it was at final gravity, de-gas a sample and take another gravity reading now. If it's the same, it's over-carbonated. If it's noticeably lower, then some other wild yeast or bacteria else has likely got a hold of it.


1

Sour, astringent and vinegary. Definitely sounds like an infection. Lactic and acetic acid also both have higher specific gravity than water or alcohol, so that's probably why your gravity went up between weeks two and three. Lost cause? I don't know, can you stand to drink it? If not, it's certainly not going to get any better with time. What is your ...


1

What was the OG reading? What was the FG reading? If these measurements are within the expected boundaries of your yeast strain and fermentation has stopped, then it is probably not infected. Remember, green (un-aged), un-carbonated beer will taste a bit different than the finished product. Dumping a batch should be the last resort. Give it time to mellow. ...



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