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14

...and after pitching yeast (6 hours), noticed yellow clusters of what I think was mold Mold isn't going to grow within 6 hours of chilling down the wort. What you saw was clumps of yeast from your pitch stuck to the sides of the fermentor or floating on top. Did you rehydrate your yeast (if using dry)? What I'm getting at is can mold cause ...


10

"You can't sanitize a turd" - George Fix If you can see it, feel it or smell it, you can't sanitize it. A little oil from old yeast or a plug of old hop trub wedged into a seam will never get sanitary from contact with a sanitizer. So clean first, then sanitize. Sure, a clean glass carboy looks pretty clean and will probably sanitize well, but how clean ...


10

Star-San kills yeast. Star-san doesn't discriminate across different microbes. Despite that yeast can survive a pH2 solution, the pH is not the killing action of StarSan, its the redox reaction on the cell membranes of microbes that does the killing. The low pH is just what indicates that StarSan is active, not how it kills. Keep in mind too that ...


8

White Film on Beer in Carboy Symptoms White film or flakes on top of beer is fairly common. It often happens in secondary, or in primary after the krausen falls. Don't worry - your beer is probably fine! Causes Usually, this is the result of yeast colonies being carried to the top of the beer from the trub or yeast cake by CO2, although in some cases, ...


7

I really, really hate when this happens: I'm sure most of you know how to fix it.


6

Oh, if only you were 28, then I'd all be fine. Just kidding. I'd be surprised if this accident noticeably affects the beer, regardless of your age or state of health. Beer is a pretty unpleasant place for most bacteria, and that combined with the yeast activity in the bottle that scavenges any available oxygen, and the bacteriostatic nature of the beta ...


5

Yeah bro, it looks like lactobacillus, it's a little yellow though so maybe it mold. Lacto usually looks white. I have some lacto going on right now, let me get a picture for you. Did you boil the chips first to sanitizes them, although the whiskey should have done the trick? It's probably a little sour now, or a lot who knows until you taste it. I'd ...


5

I can immediately think of three indicators. Off flavours or strange aromas Beer that ferments vigorously for longer than expected Moulds or other growth on the wort. 2 and 3 can sometimes be normal, depending on conditions (temperature etc.) and the gravity and fermentability of your wort. Occasionally yeast might cause odd-looking growth on the beer. ...


5

How do you cover the 5L mason jar? Does it have any sort of airlock, and is there a means of preventing bacteria and/or fruit flies out of the jar? I ask because fruit flies carry acetobacter (they're also known as vinegar flies), and acetobacter turns alcohol into vinegar in the presence of oxygen. So if your mead was exposed to air and a fruit fly got ...


4

Clean it with warm sanitizer. Fill it with normal strength sanitizer and leave it over night. It will be good to go IMO. Clean and sanitizer the lid also really well.


3

Since you're a self proclaimed 'maniac' when it comes to sanitization (and props to you for that!), you have probably been attacking the grime and dirt agressivly enough, during your sanitization process and spot cleaning, to remove most of the contaminenets. Although 50 batches is a respectable amount of notches under your belt, remember that every small ...


3

Have used plastic, glass, and stainless fermentors with bacteria and yeast without them infecting the next batch. Just need to make sure you do a good clean and proper sanitization. As always, there are many caveats: Are the fermenters cleanable and sanitizable? Do they have scratches or hiding places (see valves) Can you really clean and sanitize the ...


3

So, I had a 1600ml starter for my lager and it took off aggressively. I had to put a blow-off tube on my flask. I let the tube drop into about 3 inches of star-San. When the starter was all done, I had a good quarter inch of yeasties in the star-San. I have read all over these forums that that yeast would be useless. It was soaking in the star-San for 3 ...


3

The biggest infection risk in brewing is acetobacter, for the simple reason that acetobacter is everywhere and on everything. It's in your kitchen, on your hands, and frequently on the surface of fruit fresh from the orchard. It's airborne and settles on every available surface. Why is this a problem? Two reasons: Acetobacter produces acetic acid, also ...


3

I had a batch of dunkelweizen that became infected, I think from siphoning with my mouth. The off flavor is obvious, it tastes sour. At first I thought it was completely ruined, but I held onto the batch to wait it out. Over time the flavors softened and it is actually pretty tasty now. Sort of like a dark berliner weisse. Sanitization is definitely ...


2

If it smells good, and tastes good it may not be an infection. However, that looks like a little mold of some sort. Not the kind that will kill you or make you blind. Best advice is to drink the beer before the infection takes over.


2

What's the condition of the infected pail? If it's a really old pail, there might be hard to clean scratches and cracks that can harbor the infection into your next batch. That said, I think if you are careful with washing it out multiple times and following the standard sanitization routine, it's probably safe to keep the bucket.


2

My first suggestion would be to stop taking daily measurements. I usually do my first check at 7 days just to see how things are going, then leave it be for another week or two before I molest it again. 18-20C is just fine for for ale ferments. By my calculations, that's 64.4-68F, which is where I ferment all of my ales. As for the sour flavor, I ...


2

It's true, the bacterial cultures in your mouth would not be "used-to" the high alcohol content, and most importantly the acidic environment of your beer. However, make no mistake about the fact that you did contaminate your beer!!!! You will most likely see no difference in taste, however you may find that the beer doesn't age as well, the storage time may ...


2

If you took a specific gravity reading before you bottled and were confident that it was at final gravity, de-gas a sample and take another gravity reading now. If it's the same, it's over-carbonated. If it's noticeably lower, then some other wild yeast or bacteria else has likely got a hold of it.


1

Answering my own. Conducted a secondary fermentation with 5lbs of dried apricots (heated to 170 then cooled in some water) after every other adjunct didn't have much of an impact. The beer now has another flavor component and is a bit more enjoyable to drink, however, my wife still perceives the band-aid (and I can too, but her palette is a bit more ...


1

Right before bottling, the beer is really hard to contaminate. First because there is alchool in it, but mostly because there is not a lot of sugar left in your liquid. And you don't need to rinse your mouth with vodka : I always used a normal siphon, and never had problem.


1

Everything that the beer touches post chilling should be soaked in pbw or oxyclean and rinsed, whether it looks clean or not. I borrowed a carboy that looked clean, and gave it my usual overnight with warm oxyclean. And the next day there were little whisps of white foaty things in it. You can't see a boifilm, and that can get ya contaminated.


1

Don't panic. Taste the beer. If it tastes like beer, it's probably ok. If it doesn't taste like beer, but not bad, you can do a couple of things. ONE: do nothing, bottle it, and wait to see how it matures. TWO: drop 2-3 campden tablets to sterilize the beer, then prime and bottle. THREE: Pasteurize, then add a little more malt and repitch with some ...



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