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13

In short, no. Otherwise beer making would have never made it out of the middle-ages. The acidic environment and low alcohol does a good job of stemming most pathogenic bugs. Certainly some microbial contaminations might not agree with different people and make them ill. The general rule of thumb is that pathogens do not survive in beer, hence why you ...


13

...and after pitching yeast (6 hours), noticed yellow clusters of what I think was mold Mold isn't going to grow within 6 hours of chilling down the wort. What you saw was clumps of yeast from your pitch stuck to the sides of the fermentor or floating on top. Did you rehydrate your yeast (if using dry)? What I'm getting at is can mold cause ...


10

"You can't sanitize a turd" - George Fix If you can see it, feel it or smell it, you can't sanitize it. A little oil from old yeast or a plug of old hop trub wedged into a seam will never get sanitary from contact with a sanitizer. So clean first, then sanitize. Sure, a clean glass carboy looks pretty clean and will probably sanitize well, but how clean ...


9

Star-San kills yeast. Star-san doesn't discriminate across different microbes. Despite that yeast can survive a pH2 solution, the pH is not the killing action of StarSan, its the redox reaction on the cell membranes of microbes that does the killing. The low pH is just what indicates that StarSan is active, not how it kills. Keep in mind too that ...


8

White Film on Beer in Carboy Symptoms White film or flakes on top of beer is fairly common. It often happens in secondary, or in primary after the krausen falls. Don't worry - your beer is probably fine! Causes Usually, this is the result of yeast colonies being carried to the top of the beer from the trub or yeast cake by CO2, although in some cases, ...


7

Slow down a second, DWRHAH. What makes you think this batch is infected? Vigorous fermentation is usually just a sign of good yeast health. Most of my batches of beer are done with the bulk of fermentation 24-48 hours after pitching. Honey, unlike malt, is mostly monosaccharides, and is actually easier for yeast to ferment, thus would progress even faster. ...


7

I really, really hate when this happens: I'm sure most of you know how to fix it.


7

I can think of a couple of ways: Pull a sample and look at it under a microscope. Bacteria and yeast cells look quite different from each other. After you get an idea of what they look like, you can look around online for pictures of various souring organisms (acetobacter, lactobacillus, brettanomyces, enterobacter, pediococcus, etc.). That would get ...


7

The best way to get the turkey baster out with the least consequences on your wort is to wait until the beer is finished fermenting, and then just dump it out after the beer has been racked away. Whatever contamination was going to happen has already happened (hopefully you sanitized the turkey baster). Trying to fish out the turkey baster is going to be ...


6

Oh, if only you were 28, then I'd all be fine. Just kidding. I'd be surprised if this accident noticeably affects the beer, regardless of your age or state of health. Beer is a pretty unpleasant place for most bacteria, and that combined with the yeast activity in the bottle that scavenges any available oxygen, and the bacteriostatic nature of the beta ...


5

I've done intentional Brett brewing, and also have a friend who has a very persistent strain of Brett somewhere in her brewhouse that is popping up in all her beers. When young, Brett can taste kind of fruity (but not like normal ale yeast fruitiness) and starts to develop of flavor that kind of reminds me of vomit, but its not as bad as it sounds. Just kind ...


5

Yeah bro, it looks like lactobacillus, it's a little yellow though so maybe it mold. Lacto usually looks white. I have some lacto going on right now, let me get a picture for you. Did you boil the chips first to sanitizes them, although the whiskey should have done the trick? It's probably a little sour now, or a lot who knows until you taste it. I'd ...


5

I can immediately think of three indicators. Off flavours or strange aromas Beer that ferments vigorously for longer than expected Moulds or other growth on the wort. 2 and 3 can sometimes be normal, depending on conditions (temperature etc.) and the gravity and fermentability of your wort. Occasionally yeast might cause odd-looking growth on the beer. ...


5

How do you cover the 5L mason jar? Does it have any sort of airlock, and is there a means of preventing bacteria and/or fruit flies out of the jar? I ask because fruit flies carry acetobacter (they're also known as vinegar flies), and acetobacter turns alcohol into vinegar in the presence of oxygen. So if your mead was exposed to air and a fruit fly got ...


5

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


4

Clean it with warm sanitizer. Fill it with normal strength sanitizer and leave it over night. It will be good to go IMO. Clean and sanitizer the lid also really well.


4

It looks like normal Wit yeast byproducts to me. Wit yeast is a weird one anyway, imho. Does it smell like vinegar at all? A Wit should taste a little tangy, but you just need to verify that it's not infected. I'd recommend bottling now, but start checking the bottles for over-carbonation starting in about a week, and if you start getting gushers, then you ...


4

At first when I looked at it, I thought the bright white stuff you mentioned was actually glare from the lights with the distortion of the carboy, and that you were talking about the raspberries, which have since lost most of their color and look more like brains, if anything. Now that I know what you're talking about, that is definitely mold/bacteria, with ...


3

Since you're a self proclaimed 'maniac' when it comes to sanitization (and props to you for that!), you have probably been attacking the grime and dirt agressivly enough, during your sanitization process and spot cleaning, to remove most of the contaminenets. Although 50 batches is a respectable amount of notches under your belt, remember that every small ...


3

The rule of thumb I've always been taught is that if the beer smells that bad you won't drink it, and anything that simply tastes bad probably isn't enough to hurt you. That being said, I've never heard of anyone being sick due to contaminated beer, with the exception of dirty beer lines. I've gotten puking sick from dirty beer lines a few times back in ...


3

In the Middle Ages, they used to do things like add chicken broth to beer, I kid you not (I ran into a few recipes at one point). Alcohol itself tends to retard pathogens and if you aren't adding this sort of thing to your beer it is unlikely that you will get the right kind of pathogens growing to make you sick anyway. Also there are a lot of places today ...


3

Have used plastic, glass, and stainless fermentors with bacteria and yeast without them infecting the next batch. Just need to make sure you do a good clean and proper sanitization. As always, there are many caveats: Are the fermenters cleanable and sanitizable? Do they have scratches or hiding places (see valves) Can you really clean and sanitize the ...


3

Botulism toxin is the only "infection" I've heard about in the brewing community that would be potentially hazardous, but it's only a concern for canning wort. If you're not growing yeast starters in home-canned wort, it's non-issue. And even if you are, the topic is often debated. As I understand it (and I'm definitely no expert), the problem is that ...


3

The biggest infection risk in brewing is acetobacter, for the simple reason that acetobacter is everywhere and on everything. It's in your kitchen, on your hands, and frequently on the surface of fruit fresh from the orchard. It's airborne and settles on every available surface. Why is this a problem? Two reasons: Acetobacter produces acetic acid, also ...


3

I had a batch of dunkelweizen that became infected, I think from siphoning with my mouth. The off flavor is obvious, it tastes sour. At first I thought it was completely ruined, but I held onto the batch to wait it out. Over time the flavors softened and it is actually pretty tasty now. Sort of like a dark berliner weisse. Sanitization is definitely ...


3

I think that's entirely possible. At any rate, I wouldn't worry about it. I see nothing abnormal, and there's nothing you could do about it now anyway.


3

Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


3

Smell: Smells like beer. Look: Looks like beer. Taste: Tastes like beer. Verdict: It's beer! I think the issue here was paranoia of using a new sanitiser and tech. The Krausen looked to me like colony of 'something' floating on clear head, instead of all the foam looking brown and Krausen like.


3

Yep, that's definitely an infection. It's likely that either the carboy had some unwanted critters lying in wait, or something got into the wort (e.g. fruit flies, missing the bung). Did you sanitize your carboy before pouring wort into it? Sometimes freak accidents do happen, but the temperature would have nothing to do with the possibility of an ...



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