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English brewers, brewing beer for the Russian Czar's court brewed a beer with a high ABV to try and impress the royalty of Russia. Lots of hops were added to balance the malt, and survive the journey to russia. This was the original Russian Imperial Stout. As will all things, American Craft breweries have now taken this name to put a spin on any beer that ...


5

It is part marketing and part tradition. The term has origins in high gravity and hopped porters exported from England. The BJCP has this to say about the Russian Imperial Stout: Brewed to high gravity and hopping level in England for export to the Baltic States and Russia. Said to be popular with the Russian Imperial Court. Today is even more ...


4

The most important number when trying to balance bitterness in a beer is the ratio of international bittering units to starting gravity. This is often expressed as BU:GU (bittering units to gravity units). For reference, this posting has a more detailed explanation and some example BU:GU numbers for popular styles. Some Googling will get you some BU:GU ...


3

The fruitiness will reduce over time, espeically in big beer like that which can take a year or more to reach maturity, by which time the esters will definitely have lessened, so don't give up on this one just yet. Pitching dry yeast directly into secondary with a high alcohol content will lead to a poor fermentation. It will probably pick up eventually, ...


3

) The rule of thumb is 1 lb. of fruit per gal. of beer. For best results, freeze and thaw them first to break down the cell walls and extract more flavor. 2.) Nope, no extra yeast needed. 3.) Sure, it'll carb fine. Use whatever amount of priming sugar works for you. The cherries will have no effect on that.


2

Bitterness in a big stout is more than just the IBUs from hops. There is going to be a contribution of perceived bitterness from the roasted malts as well. Sometimes hopping a big roasty beer to a certain IBU value will result in a beer that is too bitter because the IBU calculation doesn't account for that roast malt contribution. This phenomenon is ...


2

It may lower the FG and it will also reduce the body of the beer substantially, which will not give you the "heavy" beer you speak of. Also, adding sugar will not change anything with the hops, since the isomerization happened during the boil. I'd advise you to rethink your plan. You may end up with a better beer at the lower OG without the sugar.


2

There are a couple of things that you can do to prevent the esters from occurring in your next brew Hydrate your dried yeast according to the instructions before pitching Use Mr Malty to calculate the correct amount of yeast to pitch Control your ferment temperature. US-05 will produce very few esters at 18C or 64-65F


2

If you are looking to minimize the roast character and are looking get that smooth, chocolaty thing you may want to use pale chocolate malt. It is much smoother than regular chocolate malt. However, if you up the fruit and reduce the roast, you may get a better reception by calling the beer a black ale vs. a stout. It sounds balanced based on your ...


1

I wouldn't add sugar or honey, since they won't leave residual sweetness. If you are concerned about preserving the hop bitterness to sweetness ratio, then you could make a steep of some light crystal, such as carapils, boil, chill and add that to the fermentor. This will help compensate for the lower OG and lower residual sweetness. However, it's probably ...


1

Triple IPA is more marketing buzz than actual style. You could characterize it as anything on the extreme high end of the alcohol scale (>10% ABV) for Imperial IPA. Pliny the Younger would be the prototypical version of this. The trick is to make sure you are still in IPA territory and not barley wine. To ensure this you need to use a large amount of ...


1

I always consider Imperial to mean "bigger" (higher abv). A more extreme version of the style with more of various ingredients. There are larger additions of specific ingredients generally based on the style, such as an Imperial IPA probably is more heavily hopped. It also seems that the word "double" could easily be interchanged most of the time. ...



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