Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

The thing about hop teas is that they contain negligible bittering levels. They do, however, contain a ton of hop flavor & aroma. If you're looking to boost IBUs but not flavor and aroma, a tea is not the way to go. In order for hops to bitter a beer, they need to be boiled to isomerize the alpha acids. Hop teas are typically made by steeping the ...


7

Referring to the BJCP Style Guidelines, the following is true: English Pale Ales (ESBs): 25-50 IBUs American Pale Ales: 20-40 IBUs IPAs: 40-60 IBUs for English, 40-70 IBUs for American, 60-120 IBUs for Imperial IPAs Based on this, the answer to your question should be in the 40+ IBU range to differentiate bitterness between pale ales and IPAs. Bear in ...


5

Keep in mind that published "standards" have little to do with commercial beer. The BJCP guidelines that most of us know are are for comparing one beer to another in a homebrew comp. They have little to no bearing on the commercial beer world, where the brewers can call their beers whatever they like and brew them however they want to. So, there's really ...


4

The easiest way to do this post boil/fermentation would be to get your hands on some isomerized alpha acid extract. Add it dropwise until the bitterness is where you want it.


4

The most important number when trying to balance bitterness in a beer is the ratio of international bittering units to starting gravity. This is often expressed as BU:GU (bittering units to gravity units). For reference, this posting has a more detailed explanation and some example BU:GU numbers for popular styles. Some Googling will get you some BU:GU ...


3

American IPAs are supposed to have from 40-70 IBUs. Many commercial examples stick to the lower end of this spectrum, Brooklyn IPA has 45 IBUs for instance. IPAs with lower IBUs (40-50) are more likely to do better commercially since most people don't like crazy amounts of hoppiness in their beer. However, many beers do well on the higher end of this ...


2

Between myself and my co-brewer Scott and his father we have a total of nine plants, of mostly different varieties. We get a nice crop of hops out of it. But to be honest, not enough to bother having them analyzed. In a dried state, we get a few of ounces of dried hop flowers per plant, enough for a few beers each. Coupled with the fact we are growing ...


2

OG should be 1.073, 75 IBU, FG somewhere around 1.013. Maybe NB uses a different efficiency to calculate things. I gave them my numbers.


2

If the store told you 34, that's what it is. IBU are based primarily on boil gravity, so if you do a partial boil you will end up with a different figure than if you do a full boil. That could very easily account for some of the differences you see. But people other than those who made the kit are simply calculating their own numbers, through a variety of ...


2

In your position, I'd just brew it, and see how you like the outcome. Many factors affect perception of bitterness - it's far from an exact science. For instance, if the recipe has been stored for any length of time at room temperature, the hop alpha acids in some hop varieties will have deteriorated up to 50% in 6 months. But let's look at the theory all ...


2

Bitterness in a big stout is more than just the IBUs from hops. There is going to be a contribution of perceived bitterness from the roasted malts as well. Sometimes hopping a big roasty beer to a certain IBU value will result in a beer that is too bitter because the IBU calculation doesn't account for that roast malt contribution. This phenomenon is ...


2

Liquid extract has about 36 ppg or points/pound/gal. That means that one lb. of LME in one gal. of water gives you an OG of 1.036. You have 5 kg or about 11 lb. Multiply that by 36 and you have a total of 396 gravity points. Divide that 5.5 (gal., roughly 23 L) and you get 72, so your OG would be 1.072. Because you're doing a concentrated boil, your hop ...


2

One way to evaluate beer bitterness is through the IBU/OG ratio. In your case that would be 151/63=2.396. Now this is hugely bitter! I don't know which style of beer you are trying to brew, but to take some guidelines, the Imperial IPA style (taken as an example of extreme bitterness) should have the following parameters: OG: 1.070-1.090 IBU: 60-120. This ...


2

This is a good question, and I've talked to a few people that agree. I think it's just the nature of the recipe definition/creation process (especially historically): we control most directly the OG, not the FG, even if we're able to anticipate/estimate it. But, yes, we're really trying to control the bitterness:sweetness ratio in the consumed beer, and FG ...


2

To expand on my comment above: For most homebrewers, unless you're willing to drop some serious money on lab equipment, your measurements will be mostly limited to weights, volumes and specific gravity (and pressure, if kegging). Most of the numbers you'll be dealing with outside these things will involve calculations based on a best-fit equations for most ...


1

In the fermentables section, if you "Add Custom" you can indicate that a fermentable (extract) addition is a "Late Addition", but it does not seem to specify exactly when/how late that addition is; I imagine it means "near flameout". As such, it looks like it will account for bitterness changes. You should probably inquire with the Brewers Friend ...


1

The alpha acids that give the bitterness from hops reach saturation somewhere around 90 IBUs. Since your hops were not exposed to the whole volume of beer (presumably they were filtered out at the of the boil) you aren't getting the full impact from them. It is reasonable to say that the IPA is actually 90 IBUs (saturation is around 90mg/L). Then divide by ...


1

There are a bunch of factors to consider here. To name a few: As you mention, zero to very little gravity will tend to increase the utilization rate as there will be less competitive inhibition from wort sugars. Boiling in water alone will mean a higher pH (as malt phosphates, even in extract brewing, would normally react with hardness in/added to the ...


1

There's plenty of commercial beers that exceed 100 IBUs, some go to absurd levels. A lot of my favorite DIPA's have over 100 (Stone's Ruination being the first that comes to mind). I've had the IBU debate with others who have made the claim of the human threshold on hops. No one has been able to cite a factual source on whether or not such a theory is at ...


1

I've been considering growing hops myself (in Madison, WI) and depending on how successful I am with that, I'd potentially be interested in having an analysis done.


1

The easiest way to figure hop substitutions is the use the Homebrew Bittering Units calculation. simply multiply the hops AA by the amount called for. For example, 1 oz. of 8% AA hops equals .5 oz. of 16% AA hops. There's no need to involve utilization at all.


1

I like the IBU calculator in Beersmith. Available at www.beersmith.com. the trail version will let you use it for 14 days, and the whole program is only $19.99. It lets you change hop types and times and automatically calculates your IBUS based on those choices. It also calculates for boil size.


1

This is a tough one to get right as there are a few formulas for calculating IBU's. This site includes a description of the two main ones and an online calculator you can use to get the numbers you need. Note that none of the formulas are perfect and will give different IBU readings. It's important to choose one and adjust to taste from there. Regarding ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible