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2

Stinging nettles used to be used in Britain to provide bittering and anti-bacterial properties in beer brewing before hops were widely available / cultured.


0

You obviously have access to the Internet. You can buy hops online (sorry that this doesnt technically answer the question, but may solve Eaga's problem).


0

It is difficult to answer this question given that we don't know what is available in your local markets. One bittering agent substitute for hops that has been used historically is spruce. Take a look a the Wikipedia article on Spruce Beer


5

Generally, a beer created without the use of hops is called a 'gruit' or 'grut'. 'Gruit' (or 'grut') can also be the term used for the mixture of spices working as a bittering agent in the beer. Some herbs commonly used in gruit: sweet gale mugwort yarrow ivy horehound heather juniper ginger aniseed carraway and really, anything else a gruit producer ...


3

Beer can be made with hops substitutes, but be aware it won't taste like any beer you've ever had before.


1

Hops have only been used in beer since ca. the 13th century, where brewers used to use locally grown herbs and spices to offset the sweetness. You could try for example brewing a witbier and leaving out the hops, and using only coriander and sour orange to bitter.


1

According to this article, Fuller's IPA and Bengal Lancer are not the same beer. The author, Zak Avery, claims to have spoken to the head brewer and concluded that the IPA is hopped exclusively with Golding. Fuller's IPA is a beer that dates from Reg Drury's tenure as head brewer. It was a fairly traditional take on IPA*, being produced at 4.8%abv ...


1

I assume that by Fuller's IPA you mean Bengal Lancer? I brewed the following recipe last summer for a just-over-five-UK-gallons batch, based on "Sara Carter Bombay IPA" which is supposed to be a Thornbridge Jaipur clone. See http://www.brew.x10.mx/Recipes.html for the original. I didn't think it tasted much like Jaipur, but was struck by the resemblance to ...


1

For a double IPA, I suggest a moderate-to-high bitterness and a massive hop flavor, with ABV in the 7.5-10% range. Denny is right-- You can really play with those hop additions and find your own groove. Remember, the later the addition, the more flavor in the final product. Given your specific hop requirements, here's what I would do for a 60 minute boil. ...


1

If you'd like to simplify your batch and increase the hop flavor and aroma, I'd make the following recommendations: Use just Simcoe for your bittering. It's likely you won't notice much of a difference in using or two types of hops since all of the aroma and hop flavor will boil off, leaving you with just bitterness. For your flavor hops, move them ...


1

Boil time is not dependent on hop additions. There is no set time to wait. You can add whatever you like whenever you like to get the results you want.


0

You can certainly use adjuncts with extract kits. Definitely keep in mind that your extract is already hopped, but you could add more hoppiness, or use dandelions if you wish. The key is finding the right time to introduce your adjuncts. I'm currently fermenting an American Porter. I added a few hop pellets when I mixed the extract with water that had been ...


1

When I first got into homebrewing, I started out adding my own twist to kits, I found this video really helpful when adding my own hop tea to bump up the hoppiness. You could also do a similar thing with speciality grains (such as crystal or amber malt). This will also help detract from the 'tang' you often get with kits and extract.



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