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0

Don't worry, this is a relatively minor problem (and a common mistake for new brewers). I do a 90 minute boil on every beer, and strongly believe there is science to back up doing a 90 over a 60 for all beers (not just those using high amounts of pils malt to drive off DMS). However, I still do my 60m. bittering hop addition @ 60m. If your bittering hops ...


0

Your OG will be higher than expected as you have boiled off a bit more wort than planned. This will... give you more alcohol, which is ok. :) Unfortunately this also means less beer going into the fermenter and less beer going into bottles/kegs. :( Due to boil off your beer will have more body. You may have more caramel/toasty notes due to the prolonged ...


2

Further to the other responses your beer is also likely to be darker than expected due to the longer time for Maillard reaction. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction


1

It's worth noting too (since this is an IPA) that in addition to the added bitterness, you will also lose a small amount of hop aroma from your last three additions. Late-addition hops are meant to go in late enough to minimize loss of volatile aromatic hop oils which are very prone to disappear as they evaporate during the boil. Of course (as already noted) ...


-1

I always boil my IPA for 90 minutes and start the hop additions at the 60 minute mark. This will give you a bit of a toffee character to your beer because the sugars in the wort will caramelize a little more. For some recipes, like a Scotch Ale, I'll take some (a couple of quarts) of my first runnings and boil that while I'm sparging and add it near the ...


6

Absolutely not a problem. You will gain just a bit of extra bitterness by boiling longer, but so little that I doubt you could notice it.


1

It's generally not recommended to import due to diseases. However, I would suggest reaching out to SABmiller and ask if you can get a few rhizomes next time they do their root "pruning" (I can't think of the correct term.) From what I've heard they're very homebrewer friendly.


1

Very few American hop farms ship to SA because we are in the Southern Hemisphere. You also need a importers license. The license is cheap, but it requires that the company sending the items to you have a certificate that the hops is clean (not infected with any bugs from the importers list). You might want to try NZ or Australia. I was going to get a few ...


2

Short answer; no. (Unless the parent was old school and painted the room blue or pink.) However, for a flowering plant: Cones are the female flower. The male flowers appear as small clusters of round buds from http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=405875 First comment on page has a pic of both.


0

Yes, yes I have made beer with no hops and all malt (and no other ingredients). It was awful. I mean truly vile.


0

Beer has traditionally been bittered by mugwort before hops became widespread. I once tried a small batch with that and it wasn't bad, but the bitterness is different and easily unpleasant. Be sure to include lots of speciality grain and top-ferment for flavor if you want to try anything like that. EDIT: unbittered beer tastes pretty bland, but there are ...



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