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16

There is an infection risk any time you open up your fermenter and especially when you throw stuff into it. If you dry hop at the right time you reduce that risk. The alcohol built up protects against infection The hops already in the beer act as a preservative The pH is unfriendly to new growth Most of the easy to eat sugars are already consumed For ...


13

I'd recommend the book Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers. Don't let the name put you off, it's packed with lots of useful historical information on brewing before the advent of hop usage. The Homebrewer's Garden is also a good book on this subject, and a bit more succinct. Yarrow is good for bittering, and grows wild throughout the US. It can be more of ...


13

Here is a pretty useful chart of different types of hops and the flavors they tend to impart on beer. http://zekeshore.com/hops_v1.12.png Things change depending on year and growing location, as well as hop style, but this is a good general idea.


13

That quote you posted is a mess. I don't even know what they're trying to say there. Yes, dry hopping will add bitterness, but not in the usual sense (which is iso-alpha acids). Dry hopping is done cold, so there is essentially no isomerization of alpha acids going on, which is what normally happens in the kettle boil. The bitterness that comes from dry ...


12

Hop aroma will dissipate over time. I found that dry hopping just as fermentation was ending (primary vessel, no secondary) resulted in losing most of the aroma over the next 1-2 weeks, but the room smelt great. I'd suggest: More hops. Don't leave them in so long. Try 3 or 4 days before you bottle. Longer times might also result in unwanted grassy or ...


11

The only way to train your palate is through practice. You can read about, theorize upon, meditate over taste descriptions, but to really get to know them, you have to practice. You can learn the aroma of the different hops by smelling some in your hands repeatedly until you can blindly identify each one. That's a helpful practice, but to really get to ...


11

Hop bursting is a technique where all hops are added late, with 30 minutes or less left in the boil. Hops contain lots of oils that impart aroma and taste into the final beer. However, when added early in the boil, most of these volatile oils boil off. Thus the oils from bittering hops added early in the boil tend to boil off and the hops only contribute to ...


10

Hop Primer: Hops have two purposes in beer*: bittering, and hops flavor/aroma. The key thing is that when your'e boiling hops in hot wort, the flavor/aroma compounds will get boiled off. As such, hops added early in the boil won't contribute much to a hoppy flavor, since they spend more time boiling- hence why they're called 'bittering hops'. Hops added ...


10

Growing and using your own hops exclusively presents two definite setbacks in brewing: variety and proportions. When you grow your own, you're generally limited to a single variety of hops which limits the hop flavors in the beers you make. Some hops contain a lot of alpha acids are are great as bittering hops (e.g. magnum), while others impart things such ...


9

I read the following on the label of a bottle of Pliny the Elder (a double IPA from Russian River in California): "Respect your elder. Keep Cold. Drink Fresh. Pliny the Elder is a historical figure, don’t make the beer inside this bottle one! Not a barley wine, do not age! Age your cheese, not your Pliny! Respect hops, consume fresh. If you must, sit on ...


9

I buy hops by the pound and store in the freezer between uses. Remove as much air as you can. I seal in ziploc bags and squeeze the air out Keep them in the freezer Realize that hops will lose some bittering power over time. Good software can help you estimate the impact. If you them up in two to three months, the change will be minimal. Buying in bulk ...


9

Alpha acids are compounds found in the flower of the hop plant and are the primary source of bitterness in beer. The alpha acids are isomerized in the boil to form iso-alpha acids. The degree of isomerization and the level of bitterness extracted is determined by the length of time the hops are boiled. The alpha acid rating is the amount of alpha acid by ...


9

The thing about hop teas is that they contain negligible bittering levels. They do, however, contain a ton of hop flavor & aroma. If you're looking to boost IBUs but not flavor and aroma, a tea is not the way to go. In order for hops to bitter a beer, they need to be boiled to isomerize the alpha acids. Hop teas are typically made by steeping the ...


9

I compost mine, and they break down just as easily as most other vegetable matter that gets thrown on the pile. I'm normally adding a few ounces of hop material at most to a compost pile that's full of pounds of grain and kitchen scraps and everything else. I think any serious anti-microbial action that they possess is outweighed by the fact that ...


8

I'm not sure whether the vacuum seal is required, but they definitely need to be stored in the freezer. I had a few ounces of whole leaf hops leftover from a batch that I accidentally put back in the fridge rather than the freezer. When I went to take them out a few weeks later, they had liquefied into a brown, disgusting goo.


8

This is a nice technical question involving some organic chemistry I do not comprehend. I'll begin with what I do know about bittering contributions from alpha acid and beta acids. These acids are components of the hop cone and contribute to bitterness in slightly different ways. The more familiar one is probably alpha acid since most hop bags are labeled ...


8

http://bayareabrewing.com/category/homebrew/10/ Theory A hopback is a sealed chamber into which you put whole leaf hops. Hot wort exits the kettle, passing through the hopback before chilling. Like whirlpool additions, the hops contribute volatile aroma compounds that would normally evaporate in the boil. The leaf hops also filter hot break, helping to ...


8

What you're tasting is the distinct flavor of west-coast hops. Most people liken it to a citrus, grapefruit, or sometimes orange peel aroma and flavor. You might be getting guava from the combination of tangy hops and a sweet, sugar-cookie base from the malt. Racer 5 uses Centennial, Chinook, Cascade, and Columbus hops. I've heard that Islander IPA uses ...


8

Put in the volume of the water you're boiling. Hopville knows how to handle partial boils. As for your second question, I think that's still up for debate. Beer bitterness and hop utilization is not fully understood. The original theory was that the high concentration of sugar in a partial boil (or any high-gravity boil) would prevent the alpha acids from ...


8

I have never had success with that method. 1tbsp of extract is someone trying to sound smart. I am not a fan of trying to fix an existing brew. Drink, or blend it with a hoppy IPA. LEarn from it and either change your process or modify your recipe and rebrew it. Make it the next thing to brew. As homebrewers we bounce around a lot. But if you want to ...


8

Usually the pellets will dissolve during boil and settle down to the bottom of your kettle when you cool your wort. Then, when transferring to the fermentor you can just leave them behind (easier to do with a siphon). Or Use a hop bag - put the pellets on the bag, when you are done with the boil simply pull the bag out.


8

The hop pellets are not supposed to dissolve into your wort. Rather, the boiling isomerizes the alpha acids in the hops (and the isomerized alpha acids will dissolve into the wort), giving the wort its intended bitterness. However, it is totally normal to get an "oil slick", film or foam of hops on top of the boiling wort. Hops have three purposes: ...


7

There is satisfaction, and frustration, in growing hops. I personally have 6 hop varieties growing. Problems: variable yields. Your local weather will have a huge effect on what variety you can grow, and what yield you get. Some sources list between 1/2 to 2 pounds of dried hops per vine. I've never been able to get anywhere near that, even though my ...


7

I always use this hop substitution chart, but there are others available too. According to it, Horizon and Newport are substitutions for Magnum. Galena, Nugget, and Fuggle are substitutions for Newport, so you could try that too. Finally, it lists Magnum as a substitute for Columbus, which might be easier to find. The BYO chart suggests Northern ...


7

It helps, but is not necessary The more the hops are exposed to wort the better the aromas and flavors will transfer to the beer. Use something you can sanitize - smooth like marbles, coins, washers or silverware. It shouldn't lay on the bottom of the vessel; instead, suspend it in the middle of the brew. Brew Strong recorded an episode all about dry ...


7

I know you specified carboy, but for those looking to dry-hop in the keg, it's also important not to have the bag sink to the bottom and sit over the outlet. You pull out all sorts of nasty sediment and flavors that way, particularly when using pellet hops. I've managed to solve this by throwing both a sanitized ping pong ball and a sanitized washer in the ...


7

You don't need to do anything to sanitize the hops. By the time your beer is going into a secondary, the alcohol and pH make it very resistant to infections. Just make sure to use a fine mesh bag. I didn't do that during my first attempt at dry hopping and it was almost impossible to get all of the hop particles out of the finished beer :)


7

I would try furnace filters and a box fan (~2:40). You probably want to avoid a normal food dehydrator, because most of them use heat as well as moving air, so whatever you're drying winds up getting cooked as well as dried, which will break down some of the more subtle chemical compounds. If you can't do that for some reason, I would try something like ...


7

For some hands on learning with less effort required than brewing several SMASH batches, you can dry hop some bland beer as explained here. I did not write that nor have I tried it yet but it looks like an interesting experiment.


7

Not in particular. I've compiled one from multiple sources, both paper and digital, for http://brew-journal.com/hops/. http://homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Hops is one of the better sources. https://byo.com/resources/hops too, but poor ui. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_hop_varieties of course has an article that's suprisingly complete, except ...



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