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7

Most recipes are formulated for full wort, full gravity boils. Reserving extract would increase your hop utilization and the beer would be slightly, but probably not noticeably, lighter. Make your own decision about the benefits.


5

On a theoretical level, with worts that are completely free of suspended solids, then for the quantity of iso-alpha acids extracted would be the same. In practice, there are some limiting factors, that make scaling down (using relatively more hops in less solution) non-linear: there is a maximum solubility of iso-alpha acids, around 120 ppm/80 IBU for a 5% ...


5

Why not save the hops you don't use and use them in another brew? Although vacuum sealing them is the best way, they'll keep fine for several months in a zip lock freezer bag. Just squeeze out as much air as possible after you put the hops in the bag and keep the bag in the freezer. That way your current beer gets the proper amount of hops and you aren't ...


3

Mashing shouldn't be affected by the altitude. However, hop utilization at lower temperatures is fairly significant. Ray Daniels republished a correction factor in homebrewdigest here. Depending on what part of Denver you live, you'll see about an 18% - 20% reduction in utilization versus that at sea level. The biggest difference I noticed brewing in ...


3

I don't know if you've ever tasted the results of boiling hops in water, but I have...it's harsh and vegetal and certainly nothing I'd want to put in my beer! Not to mention, is it really worth the extra effort? How much do you think you'll save? It really won't have all that much impact on how much hops you use.


3

In an all-grain brew, this becomes more difficult, since you generally need all of your mash/sparge water passing through the mash to hit your target gravity/efficiency. In that case, you might consider using the last runnings of the mash, since it's more dilute. Personally, I'd rather use an extra dollar's worth of hops than worry about separating my ...


3

You would essentially be making a hop tea, this would improve your extraction efficiency especially if you are doing a partial mash boil. I would probably only do this for the bittering hops and just add the flavor and aroma to the main boil since you don't get much bitterness from those additions anyway. You may also have to tweak your recipe a bit to get ...


3

This is a great exercise. Months ago I brewed a single hop brown ale and now I can identify Northern Brewer hops. That beer was a single bittering addition at 90 minutes, but the idea is the same. I would keep the aroma addition where it is. Boiling and dry hopping work differently so you might miss out on something without the last kettle addition. The ...


2

The podcast "High gravity brewing" with John Palmer discusses this at the 18 minute mark. To paraphrase, John says that hop utilization does decrease with higher wort gravity, but not because of solubility as originally thought (the difference in solubility between 1.040 and 1.080 is negligible), but mostly because there are more solids in the wort that ...


2

It's not the extract specifically that's the problem but the lower utilization resulting from the higher gravity of a partial boil. If you're not doing a partial boil, then no need to scale. But if you are, then your main recourse is to scale the bittering hops to match the target IBUs, as you've done. Scaling the FWH addition is interesting, since as well ...


2

Yes it works, more commonly know as a hopburst, I believe. Google for "baby faced assassin homebrew" and read the many blogs about a UK homebrewer turned pro who did one with Citra hops.


2

As far as I understand, the hop utilization is affected by the specific gravity of the wort. E.g, the Daniels formula for calculating IBUs takes the boil gravity into account. My only source is this ppt :) Steeping grains does not substantially increase the gravity and should thus not affect hop utilization. According to Daniels, brewing with a boil ...


2

if you are using brewing software a lot of them have the option of indicating that your extract is being used as a 'late kettle addition' and you can then set the time (i.e. 15m from flameout), by doing this the software should automatically adjust your SRM and IBU's.


1

I dont know that that will help, but you can always use a higher alpha hop variety to increase the utility of your hops.


1

After entering this into hopville..the ibu's top in the 60's. So in theory this should work. Most of my other ipa's i've used 60, 10, 5, and flameout. This would definitely ease the brew schedule. Hopville link http://hopville.com/recipe/1174343/american-ipa-recipes/10min-amarillo-ipa using a 4 g boil, ibus are 69 / After upping to 6 g ibus increased to ...


1

Your process seems fine - I do split batches for the same reason, and not had the problem with body. Do you have measured OG/FG figures? As the gravity of the mash increases, extraction efficiency typically decreases so you may not get out expected efficiency if you base ts on what you normally get when doing a full mash and undiluted boil. Just a ...


1

One thing I did in my apartment was to get a griddle that would cover 2 burners. Put both burners on high, with the griddle on top. Put the brew kettle on the middle of the griddle. You get somewhere around 1.5 the BTUs of 1 burner (some is lost to waste heat, unless you rig up a proper way to hold that heat in, which I never really investigated).


1

Electric brewing with heat sticks. Or you can supplement your stove top with a little extra heating capacity using a heat stick. Start here with this heat stick page Listen to the April 29th 2010 Electric Brewing episode at Basic Brewing Radio.


1

I've had the same problem on our small apartment stove, and the best trick I could come up wih was to preheat water in a separate kettle while I'm doing other prep work so I can have hot water on hand rather than try to bring 3 gallons to a boil all at once.



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