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7

Most micro organisms will not grow in honey due to it's low water activity rating of 0.6. Bacteria needs at least 0.91 and fungi needs .7 water activity to grow. The water activity of distilled water is exactly 1. Most honey should be fine for making mead without heating. You do need to be aware that if it starts to separate the water activity has ...


7

Wouldn't this cause bottle bombs or be cloyingly sweet? No. Honey, like any other sugar added to the primary or secondary, will ferment out completely with enough time. Just make sure the beer is fermented to fullness before bottling. Honey is pretty much 100% fermentable, so if you are going to add it to secondary, you should take a gravity reading ...


6

Here is a link to a document written by Steve Piatz who was the AHA mead maker of the year a few years ago. The method is often referred to as the staggered nutrient addition method. The types of nutrients typically used are Yeast Energizer which contains diammonium phosphate(DAP) and fermaid K or Nutriferm Advance which are similar nutrient blends. The ...


6

According to your recipe you're at 1.052 estimated OG. According to the Mr. Malty calculator that @baka posted, you'd want 2 smack-packs to get to the recommended amount of yeast. So yes, you probably under-pitched, and that's why you're seeing a lag in yeast activity. However, you don't need to panic. It can take 24-72 hours to see signs of ...


6

No, it is not necessary. In fact, many argue that it's much better to not heat it, as pasturizing the honey often time strips the honey of it's aroma & heat-sensitive aromatics. I would add the unfermented cider and the honey and stir it like crazy with sanitized spoon or other mixing device. Much like the "no-heat" meadmaking method. This will ...


6

Based on my experience and priming experiments I've done, honey adds no flavor when used as priming. You only a tiny bit and it ferments out leaving no flavor behind. In addition, since the fermentability is variable, you don't really know what your carbonation level will be.


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


4

In the words of Dwight Schrute, "That's debatable. There are basically two schools of thought..." Some people swear that honey should never be heated, and others maintain that heating or chemical pasteurization is necessary. Regardless of your stance, it's undeniable that heating honey destroys it's aroma and flavor, so it's best to minimize the amount of ...


4

1 smack pack in a barleywine, you say? I've found that bigger beers tend to have longer lag times before the yeast get going, and unless you made a sizable starter, the yeast are going to have to work even harder. If you didn't make a starter, it wouldn't hurt to pitch more yeast. It will probably also help to aerate/oxygenate again. You're generally ...


3

Assuming you followed sanitary practices, then I don't think you've wasted any money at all. sounds like a tasty mead...maybe a bit heavy on the ginger, but that's really down to personal preference. When making mead, it's a good idea to add yeast nutrient with the honey so the yeast have something to propagate from, and remember to airate well, especially ...


3

I first saw this method in The Compleat MeadMaker by Ken Schramm. It seems northern-brewer-chris also uses a method that's similar. Ever since I read this, I've been practicing it and I've never looked back. I can finish a clean (not hot) mead fermentation in 6-8 weeks now instead of the accepted, ambiguous "months". I still spend a good bit of time aging ...


3

There are certain varietal honeys that can add a significant amount of flavor and aroma to a beer. Buckwheat honey in particular has a very strong flavor and aroma even after fermentation. There are certain wildflower and clover honeys that will also stand out. If you would like more honey character to come through you need to choose a varietal that is ...


3

In the quantities that honey is typically used, changing the variety of honey will have a slight effect on flavor and aroma, but little else. Strained honey or raw honey might add a slight haze from pollen, but honeycomb, wax, and anything else should settle out during primary or secondary. Ultrafiltered honey should have no effect on clarity. ...


3

People will tell you that bugs won't grow in raw honey, and they're right. The bad news is that they're still there and they'll grow just fine when you add water to make the must. (Let's remember people, there are bee parts in this stuff...) If you pitch well with a very large yeast population, it is possible to have a fine ferment and a fine mead because ...


2

I was going to point out that organisms that produce endospores, like Clostridium botulinum survive in honey, but then I remembered that you can not kill them by boiling. The spores could also be naturally present in anything you brew or preserve. This is why you should use a pressure cooker for canning non-acidic foods. I did a bit more research, and found ...


2

I don't believe there is a definitive answer to this question. My personal view would be that braggot is a mead made with malt, and not a beer made with honey. I'd say a mead is a fermented beverage with more than 50% of its sugars from honey, thus your brew would not fit the bill. However, the Mazer Cup mead competition defines braggot as "Honeywine made ...


2

In my experience orange blossom honey adds a great citrus note and is much less "grassy" than clover honey. It goes great in Amber Ales.


2

These are very thick bottles. While I wouldn't let them pressurize forever, if you keep them cold, wear leather work gloves, and bring them outside in a bucket of ice water, you should be able to open them safely (and messily). I also recommend using safety glasses. For safety (and cleanliness) reasons, I wouldn't try to save them. You might be ok if you ...


2

The original gravity reading was probably low due to insufficient mixing. Unless you stir the wort vigorously for a good while, it will stratify with sugary wort at the bottom and thin wort at the top. See this question for more details about why your starting gravity might be low. The final gravity reading is probably correct. Did you taste the beer ...


2

If its been in the primary 8 days at 65, why not increase the temperature and gently shake? A lot of styles recommend increasing fermentation temp when the beer is beginning to near the projected final gravity. Though i don't have experience with that strain the yeast will likely get moving and take you down another few points.


2

You're making a real lager, so try to keep the temps as low as possible - around 50F/10C would be about ideal. (The fermentation will raise temperature this by about 6F/3C.) But if you don't and let it warm up, it will still be a lager - it's because of the yeast - S-23 is a true lager strain (Saccaromyces pastorianus). Lager yeast tend to produce sulphur ...


2

Why use honey when table sugar is actually a better substitute and more readily available? Yes you can use honey, but measuring it out and adding it to each bottle or en masse to the bottling bucket will be tricky, especially ensuring the honey is evenly mixed in the bottling bucket. Some people recommend using DME to prime, and while this may be the ideal ...


1

As Thomas answered, safety is paramount right now. Glass shrapnel is a serious reality, and you don't want that in your eyes, hands, face, anywhere. Wear gloves, wear glasses, I'd even recommend a jacket/sweater when venting to keep shrapnel out of your arms/torso. Keep your beer as cold as possible to slow down fermentation. Store them away from ...


1

Saflager S-23 is a lager yeast. http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/SFG_S23.pdf 9-22°C as it ferments 12-15°C when you lager the beer. http://billybrew.com/swamp-cooler-homebrew try doing swamp cooler to get that temp down and under control. Lager not recommended for someone starting out. If you can't control fermantion temperature then ...


1

It will raise the OG, but add little to no flavor. If you want honey flavor to remain, you need to add it to a secondary fermenter. Even then it will likely be minimal. If you add honey to the boil, the flavor and aroma will be driven off by boiling and fermentation. Whether or not the yeast will be fine depends on what yeast you're using, how much of it ...


1

I don't know where djr obtained his information to say "Crystallized honey is more likely to spoil (ferment)". Honey will only ferment if it is robbed from the hives before the bees have ripened /dried it to less than 18 percent moisture. Commercial bee keepers wreck their honey of it's enzymes by heating it in order to kill the spores which only become ...


1

One thing you could try is to add some ginger extract to a bottle of commercially made IPA to test it out. If you like the result, you can further experiment with the amount of ginger you think is appropriate to add to the beer. If you don't like it, then you just avoided brewing 5 gallons of beer you won't want to drink. If you decide to do this ...



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