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I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. You could warm it up in the 70sF (24C?) and see if you can get more fermentation, but I suspect you won't get much more with that yeast. Personally, I would ...


2

The yeast will eventually ferment out more sugar, but it can take many months. I have a High FG 12% beer in a keg that I thought was done, only to find it had built up a lot of pressure as the beer continued fermenting. (To be more thorough I should take a sample, degass it and measure the FG to see how much it's dropped.)


1

Try the tab that says "repitching from slurry" and it will show the volume of (packed) yeast that calculated. It will be much less than the volume shown on the first tab, which seems to be the 2.75L you referred to above.


1

Definitely don't bottle this right now. It is very possible that the yeast will slowly continue fermenting this and create bottle bombs. What is I think it is unrealistic to expect WLP 002 to do the rest of the work from here unless you wait a while. WLP 002 is a medium attenuator, and going from 1.110 to 1.045 (60% attenuation), it is nearing in the ...


1

It all comes down to mash temp. Lower mash temps(145-148) will yield more fermentable sugars. Down side is you lower your mash efficiency and need to compensate with more grain or adjuncts. But you will have a substantially dry beer. Even with a iipa you should be able to hit 1.01.


1

If your pH is that high in your water you'll want to lower it. pH that high will stop conversion/make it take longer. Look at using salts to add base to the water, also make sur eyou are using campden tablets to remove the chlorine and chloramine from your tap water if that what you brew with, yeast hate it.



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