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6

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to ...


4

I'd be willing to bet that the high FG was due to insufficient yeast pitching. By itself, most yeast can handle up to 13% ABV, so it isn't the intolerance of your alcohol level. I would recommend doing a yeast starter for brews this high in gravity (a little late now obviously). In your situation, I would consider pitching another packet of yeast (see the ...


3

I recently brewed a 14% RIS using a similar technique - I started out with S-04, and then used WLP099 to continue where that couldn't. Since the WLP090 yeast strain has a high alcohol tolerance, you only need the WLP099 if you're talking abv levels above around 13%. I think your plan sounds about right - although I would use more WLP090 and less WLP099, or ...


3

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


1

Average it! Multiply your starter volume and wort volume by their original gravities respectively to produce numbers that can be combined to derive an average gravity reading from the blend. Do this by dividing the sum of the gravity-volume products by the sum of all wort: ( ( OG1 * V1 ) + ( OG2 * V2 ) ) / ( V1 + V2 ) = SG Where... OG1 is the ...


1

The only way to know if it's stuck or it's finished is to do a forced fermentation test at 20°C/68°F on a small amount of the beer (say 1qt) with a fresh yeast. WLP007 is a relatively good attenuator for an English strain, with the range given as 70-80%. The upper limit is in the optimum case, and you'll typically only reach this if there is ...


1

The only way to know for certain whether or not fermentation has completed is to take gravity readings. If you notice that the gravity doesn't change after 3-4 days, and remains at a SG of 1.021, then you most likely have a stuck fermentation. Unfortunately, pitching another vial of yeast is not likely to be as effective as you may need it to be. In order ...


1

Homebrew Talk pulled the recipe from clone brews. Looks like they use 1084 from Wyeast, which judging by the OG and FG, is cutting it a little too close for my liking since 1084 caps at 12% ABV. Wyeast 2206 is a lager strain, which would go against the recipe being an ale, plus it has even less tolerance. I suspect if you lager it with 2206 (or ...



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