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6

Putting 10.5kg of grain in 11.5 litres of water will kill your efficiency, unfortunately: From Braukaiser: Traditional British style infusion mashes are with about 2-2.5 l/kg (1 - 1.15 qt/lb) very thick and German style mashes are generally much thinner (3.5-5 l/kg / 1.75-2.5 qt/lb). Historically this is rooted in the fact that the latter needed to ...


5

If the starter fully fermented, most of the 1.040 should be gone; normal yeast attenuation is around 75%, so you should have 1L of 1.010 beer in the starter vessel. 1L of 1.010 beer into 19L of 1.076 OG wort would reduce the OG down to about 1.073. (76 points * 19L + 10 points * 1L) / 20L = 72.7 points = 1.073. Though if possible, you should try to ...


3

I would definitely not bottle yet. You may get bottle bombs, but you'll definitely get a beer that's too sweet. It's only been 2 weeks and for a high gravity barley wine, that's not much at all. You could warm it up in the 70sF (24C?) and see if you can get more fermentation, but I suspect you won't get much more with that yeast. Personally, I would ...


3

The easiest way to determine the effect of starter gravity is to decant the starter so the amount is negligible. In addition, I've found that it makes better beer.


3

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


3

I recently brewed a 14% RIS using a similar technique - I started out with S-04, and then used WLP099 to continue where that couldn't. Since the WLP090 yeast strain has a high alcohol tolerance, you only need the WLP099 if you're talking abv levels above around 13%. I think your plan sounds about right - although I would use more WLP090 and less WLP099, or ...


2

I'd suspect either a faulty thermometer that's reading deceptively low is to blame, or perhaps your mash water chemistry is really off and you aren't getting full conversion. For the former, check your thermometer in crushed ice-water to ensure that its reading 32F, and in boiling water to ensure its 212F. Don't be shocked if you can't get it to read 212F ...


2

Your efficiency goes down as the gravity of your beer goes up. That's because of the sugar you leave behind when using a "normal" amount of water. In order to increase your effieincy, you need to sparge more. That also means you need to boil longer to drive off the extra water.


2

The yeast will eventually ferment out more sugar, but it can take many months. I have a High FG 12% beer in a keg that I thought was done, only to find it had built up a lot of pressure as the beer continued fermenting. (To be more thorough I should take a sample, degass it and measure the FG to see how much it's dropped.)


1

Definitely don't bottle this right now. It is very possible that the yeast will slowly continue fermenting this and create bottle bombs. What is I think it is unrealistic to expect WLP 002 to do the rest of the work from here unless you wait a while. WLP 002 is a medium attenuator, and going from 1.110 to 1.045 (60% attenuation), it is nearing in the ...


1

If your pH is that high in your water you'll want to lower it. pH that high will stop conversion/make it take longer. Look at using salts to add base to the water, also make sur eyou are using campden tablets to remove the chlorine and chloramine from your tap water if that what you brew with, yeast hate it.


1

I would focus on the yeast. How old were the yeast packs? Viability and cell count starts to drop off after just a few weeks. How big was the starter and what was the O.G.? Did you use a stir plate? There is a yeast calculator at Mr. Malty that I have found to be helpful. A stir plate helps quite a bit too. Make sure the temperature of your starter is near ...


1

The fast ferment is a good idea. What temp did you mash at? Ending at 1.030 is pretty high. You can throw in some champagne yeast and it won't change the character much, if at all. You can also throw in white labs 090 or 099, be careful of the 099 it can ferment very low.


1

Average it! Multiply your starter volume and wort volume by their original gravities respectively to produce numbers that can be combined to derive an average gravity reading from the blend. Do this by dividing the sum of the gravity-volume products by the sum of all wort: ( ( OG1 * V1 ) + ( OG2 * V2 ) ) / ( V1 + V2 ) = SG Where... OG1 is the ...



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