Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

I don't understand the chemistry behind it, but its pretty straight forward. Roasted barley is unmalted, where chocolate or black patent has been malted. When using roasted barley the head on a stout stays tanish in color. When you rely on the malted versions of dark roasted grains they contribute darker colors to the head. Think the difference between ...


7

In the pubs the creamy nead is achieved through the CO2/Nitrigen gas mix as mentioned already. It is also achieved by using a stout tap. A stout tap is similar in all respects to a regular tap, however the one significant difference is that inserted into the tap is a small disk that diffuses the beer through a number of small holes around the perimeter of ...


7

Adding some wheat to the recipe can give some good body and head retention. There are a bunch of other methods as well. Check out this BrewWiki article on Head Retention. The main methods are: The use of body and head enhancing malts such as crystal, wheat, or carafoam The altering of the mash schedule to enhance head retaining proteins The use of heading ...


5

The first place I always start with head retention is glassware. If your cleaned you glass with any type of detergent, especially in a dish washer; a head-negative residue can be left behind on the glass. To really rule this out I'd soak the glass in some warm/hot PBW (or other non-detergent cleaner). Then rinse really well with warm water. Finish with a ...


4

As Denny mentioned, head formation is primarily related to protein though dissolved carbonation level will also have something to do with it. If you're adding a fixed amount of priming sugar to a single pressure vessel, as you dispense beer, the increased amount of headspace will allow some of the CO₂ to leave the beer, making it flatter. You do not want to ...


4

I would recommend using an anti-foam agent such as fermcap-s http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/fermcap-s-1-oz.html or if your LHBS carries another anti foam agent. I have used these with great success in the past to prevent boil overs and also cut down on the mess associated with fermentations that require a blow-off tube.


3

You definitely just need to wait longer. I always wait at least two weeks, more for higher gravity beers. Waiting will not only improve the quality of the head and carbonation level, but almost everything else about the beer will get better if you give it more time. A side note on your step 6, it's best to keep splashing to a minimum when racking after ...


3

Carbonating the beer from priming sugar takes at least a week, often closer to 2 to be ready. The problem here is that you were sampling a too early: After another couple of days I was tapping off nice pints of dark ale under reasonable pressure (at least I thought it was reasonable pressure - it might not have been) but with no head. I'd only tap a ...


3

Its one of the following: Incomplete fermentation leaving residual sugar in the bottle. Too much priming sugar. Which would also be amplified as a problem if #1 is the case. You inadvertently picked up an infection and the non-fermentables along with the priming sugar has led to over carbing. Your opening the bottles warm and the CO2 is no longer ...


3

Foam formation is related to the protein content of the beer and fermentation specifics. You can increase the protein content by steeping some non diastatic malt, like crystal, as part of your brewing liquor. Once you have the protein in your beer, increased hopping increases foam as the polyphenols in the hops bind the proteins in the beer. For the ...


3

There are literally hundreds of factors affecting head formation and retention. Even though you've eliminated process problems, I'm going to list everything I know of that will harm head. Are you using a partial boil? If so, that could be the biggest problem, as proteins will precipitate out of solution, but then when you dilute the wort after the boil, ...


2

While Head is primarially aesthetic, you can gather some useful information about your brew process. You could possibly be under pitching or fermenting too warm leading to an increase in fusel alcohols, which have been shown to destroy the compound used to create foam. If you are cleansing with household agents, the residue from them may reduce your head, ...


1

Here's a scientific publication that may interest you. (from the abstract) "Microscopic observations have shown that the fast antifoams rupture the foam films by the so-called "bridging" mechanisms, which involve the formation of oil bridges between the two surfaces of the foam film."


1

Yes rinse aid could be the problem here but before we jump there I think you need to wait a bit longer. After six days there is a slim chance your beer isn't even fully carbonated yet. What I've found is that it takes a at least a week, but usually two to actually develop a nice tight head. For a while you may have OK carbonation and loose big bubbles that ...


1

Rinse aid could be the culprit, the main killer of head however, is oils, any oils. My first extract kit did not have noticeable head either, and a lot of my beers now, still don't have head, because I'm focusing on the body. This that can help help are carapils/carafoam speciality grain, but these should be used to make beer better, not as a focus point. ...


1

Fermentation practices and pitching rates can have a large effect on beer foam, as Brandon mentioned. There's a great article here beer foam that not only describes this but also includes test you can do to help determine what the problem might be.


1

This is in no way from first-hand experience, but I heard from one of the guys at a local brew shop that some dish soaps can leave a coating on your glasses that will reduce the head size when pouring a beer. Its a bit of a long shot, but its worth trying an extra thorough rising before chilling/using your beer glasses.


1

What was the final gravity? How long did you ferment before bottling? I'm guessing that there were residual fermentable sugars (i.e. fermentation wasn't complete) or you used too much priming sugar when bottling. Either way, the yeast had too much sugar left to consume inside the bottle and produced too much carbonation. If you hit your final target ...


1

All the nitrogen does is allow the beer to be pushed at a higher pressure than CO2 would, since nitrogen is much less soluble than CO2. It's this higher pressure that contributes to the head and "creamy" mouthfeel, since the high pressure pour strips out much of the carbonation. Many years ago, before Guinness used nitro, the 6 packs came with a syringe. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible