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5

Mostly economical, yes. Another reason is potentially limited (or non-existent) commercial availability of specific strains. Either the yeast company's seasonal strain releases or something cultivated from yeast remaining in the bottle. Another reason is to develop a "house" strain, or to modify the behavior of an existing strain. For instance, the ...


3

I assume they're all different re-pitches of the same original strain? Certainly you would want to keep different strains apart so you can pitch based on their desired properties. But even still, I would keep the harvested yeast separate, if only so you can use them in a FIFO order of collection. The method you're using the harvest yeast has a reliable ...


2

The "scientific" way would be to use a microscope and hemacytometer to count cells. The empirical method is what I use and has worked well for me for several hundred batches. You make a guess! I use between 1/3-1/2 of a previous slurry if I'm going to direct pitch the slurry. I use between 2 TBSP. -1/4 cup if I'm going to make a new starter from slurry.


2

I've been washing yeast for years now and I've never had washed yeast be completely dead, even after 9 months, but that doesn't mean you should necessarily use it. If you do wash yeast, ALWAYS prepare a starter. This will let you know if the viability is good (if it propagates) and smell the starter before pitching. I have ruined two batches by pitching ...


2

In Yeast (White & Zainasheff), they have a table of the reliable and max shelf life of yeast storage techniques: Harvested slurry: 2 weeks / 6 weeks Agar plate: 1 month / 1 year (if sealed) Agar slant: 3 months / 1-2 years Agar stab: 4 months / 2-3 years Water immersion: 6 months / 3-5 years … &c., up to professional freezing. People report ...


2

First, make sure there's yeat there to capture! Some people mistake any sediment for yeast. For instance, every German lager I know of is filtered so there won't be any yeast. Assuming there is yeast, make up about 2 cups of 1.020 wort. Flame the opening of the bottle with the yeast you want to capture and pour the sediment into your starter wort. Let ...


2

Yes, harvest them. IME, frost burn will ruin them.


1

In order: WLP004 and 1084 are actually the same yeast. Slightly different environments and /or methods of analysis probably account for the slightly different specs from each manufacturer. Yeast is a living thing after all. Your own brewing environment and methods will affect attenuation more than WhiteLabs vs WYeast will. If you're going for dry, read ...


1

I don't think this will make it easier for anaerobic bacteria - they are not really affected by the presence or lack of oxygen, and since there is little food available I doubt they would propagate anyway. I don't think it will do any harm, but you may want to try harvesting two jars yeast at the same time both with and without a vacuum to see if there ...



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