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19

Gyspum (CaSO4) does a couple different things. If you add it to the mash, it can lower the pH. The added sulfate content will also accentuate the bitterness of your beer. If you want to increase the sulfate for bitterness enhancement but don't want to change your mash pH, you can add it directly to the kettle. The best way to decide how much to add is to ...


4

Gypsum does two things: It releases calcium ions into the mash, which combine with phosphates from the grain to create an acid, thus acidifying the mash. It provides sulphate ions which contribute a flavour. It's widely reported that sulphates accentuate hop bitterness and give a slight saltiness to the beer. If you took all your gypsum and added it only ...


4

Your brew will definite taste salty with that quantity of minerals added. I would use a third of that amount. 150ppm calcium and 250ppm sulphates is really the upper limit of what you can comfortably use in the beer, and you will still taste a little salt up front, but often it goes with the style. Here are some guidelines from the HBT wiki, ...


3

Wow, that average pH is low compared to my water just over here in the Pittsburgh suburbs. Mine is 8.3. Your water is pretty neutral, mine is alkaline. Anyways, here's my suggestion: Don't adjust your water this time. Water adjustment is a pretty technical topic and if you want to start doing it, be prepared to experiment. I recently switched to all ...


2

Your Ca is a bit on the low side, as is your SO4 for a hoppy beer. Your mash pH will likely be OK, so I'd add a tsp. of gypsum to the boil for yeast nutrients and to accentuate the hops. Then, before you brew again, check out the water info on howtobrew.com and braukaiser.com.


2

Austin Homebrew's kits are top notch as is their support. I strongly suggest you contact them if you have any questions regarding one of their kits. If they added it, it wasn't done arbitrarily. It may be a particular style of beer may benefit from it, such as a stout.


1

Hardness is only one component of water. You need to look at the full analysis to see what's causing it in order to know what to do about it. Then, use a water spreadsheet (I recommend Bru'nwater https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/) to calculate how to correct for it. Your fears about water additions are unfounded. If done correctly, no off flavors ...



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