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Hops are normally grown from rhizomes to ensure you're getting the right strain - hop seeds will often be a cross-breed and may have unpredictable flavour or alpha acid characteristics. Differences between male & female plants are most noticeable once they flower. I don't know about suppliers in Europe, but you can generally find hop rhizomes even in ...


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Hops can grow well anywhere between the 30th and 50th parallels. How well they do in a small-scale, home gardener setting is really up to how good of a gardener you are, which in turn comes down to how dedicated you are to their upkeep. That said, hops are very fast growers and as such require a lot of water. This is why the Pacific Northwest of the US is ...


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I googled around a bit and came up with this: At the end of the season healthy bottom vines can be buried for the propagation of new plants the next spring. Simply bury the vines in a shallow trench and mark their location. In spring dig them up and cut them into pieces about 4 inches long. Make sure each new cutting has an eye or bud. It sounds easy ...


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I just waited until the winter and then dug up the entire rhizome for each plant (they were pretty big, it was a lot of digging). I separated the rhizome from the soil and put them in an open box in the new house's garage. It was cold in there, which I think is pretty key. I left them in my garage for around a month after the move because I didn't have ...


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Between myself and my co-brewer Scott and his father we have a total of nine plants, of mostly different varieties. We get a nice crop of hops out of it. But to be honest, not enough to bother having them analyzed. In a dried state, we get a few of ounces of dried hop flowers per plant, enough for a few beers each. Coupled with the fact we are growing ...


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I grew Fuggle, Cascade, and Hallertauer in MI for years. I got decent yield after one year on my Cascade and Hallertauer, while the fuggle struggled consistently and eventually died off. Do some research on the climates each different cultivar likes and use that to heavily inform your decision along with what beer styles you're looking to brew.


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I've also heard the 2-3 year timeline for getting a viable crop but I've also heard some people get enough for a beer in their first year. It all depends on your local conditions. As far as what type to grow, I'd do one that would work well for dry hopping/late additions. Unless you plan on sending your hops off to be analyzed for AA levels, you'll be flying ...


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Established hops can put out new shoots for a while, and I've read (on freshhops.com, I believe) that commercial growers often cut back the first shoots of the spring and then train the second, hardier set that comes up. So even if your first set gets chewed off, they may yet put up more shoots from the rhizome. If your hops are first year, you might not ...


1

Hops grow from Rhizomes, essentially a stick/root that you put in the ground. Make sure you a string stretching 20 feet for the bines to grow up on. Here is a site that ships them internationally. http://www.freshops.com/order/international Here is some tips for growing hops http://www.oregonhops.org/culture2.html Cheers!


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As I understand it hop vines are pretty vigorous (growing to be up to 3m tall in one season), so yes, I would worry about them choking out grapes (or at least competing for leaf space) if they were planted to use the same trellis. Of course, like most close plantings, they may work fine, just with somewhat lowered yields each. You should try it for one ...


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I'd say you'll have a hard time with any variety you decide to grow there. Hops grow best around the 45th parallel and the farther away from that you are, the more problems you'll have. That said, pick a hardy American variety like Cascade for best results and avoid British or continental varieties.


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Most hops in the US are grown in the Yakima valley, technically a desert. Watering hops may be necessary depending where you are located but let me assure you any water there would be irrigation from the grower, as there is little or no rainfall. Dripline has been recommended on many sites and I would predict this is the standard of the region.


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Seeing how you have time I think you may want to think about burying a few feet of one bine. That will serve as growth for a good new rhizome. Then you dig it up and trim it into a few pieces for planting multiple plants after you move. I don't remember all the details but a quick google search will help. I think this might be easier than trying to dig ...



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