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12

The first thing you must learn how to do is make a yeast starter. This is simpler than making beer but your sanitation must be very good, don't be intimidated. Yeast Starter Mix malt extract and water to make two quarts of 1.030 to 1.040 gravity starter wort. Consider optionally adding yeast nutrient. Sterilize this by boiling for 10 minutes. Cool to ...


6

In season, you can order Hop rhizomes (root cuttings) from several places, online, and possibly locally. I got mine from http://www.beer-wine.com/, located in Massachusetts, but they will ship them. I live in New England, so if that's Northeast enough, they grow fine here. I ordered 4 (two each of two varieties), but only two sprouted (I think both ...


5

Crop yields vary vastly depending on soil conditions, amount of rainfall, fertilization, pest control, etc. On my family's farm, there are places where the wheat grows tall and thick, and less than 10 feet away, plants are so thin and sparse that it would almost be better to let that area go fallow. In any case, crop yields for barley tend to range between ...


5

Hops can grow well anywhere between the 30th and 50th parallels. How well they do in a small-scale, home gardener setting is really up to how good of a gardener you are, which in turn comes down to how dedicated you are to their upkeep. That said, hops are very fast growers and as such require a lot of water. This is why the Pacific Northwest of the US is ...


4

Hops should be grown in well-drained soil. Mounding aids drainage, therefore may be unnecessary. It should be about three feet in diameter. Amend your soil with some organic matter like manure or grass clippings. Your trellis should be able to support thirty pounds of bines growing twenty five feet (yes, in the first year). Good luck.


4

Most places seem to do it like a pre-order deal. Whether they'll have any extra stock if you don't pre-order is probably a crapshoot. They usually come in a plastic bag. Keep them moist and cold if you can't plant right away. Several of the hops suppliers have notes on growing your own as well. Check out Fresh Hops advice here: ...


4

I planted one Cascade hop rhizome about 10 years ago. It takes 2-3 years before you get much of a crop. These days, after drying the hops, I average 5-7 lb. from that single plant! I grow it up a 6-8 ft. high deer fence, then laterally across the top. You plant the hop rhizomes in the spring. You can buy them many places, but I get mine from ...


4

I live in southern New Hampshire, and currently grow: Cascade - 4 plants, Centennial - plants, Hallerteau Mittelfruh - 2 plants, Nugget - 2 plants, Willamette - 2 plants. Hops grow very well in the northeast. Just be sure it gets at least half a day's sun (or more). It is important not to let them get too overgrown onto themselves, or they may harbor ...


3

There are a bunch of good answers here, but I want to throw out a precaution. Don't plant from seed. A male plant is very difficult to get rid of, and it will spread and pollinate all of your female plants (and your neighbors if they grow hops too). I'm not sure what a pollinated hop tastes like, but I know for sure unpollinated ones are what you want. ...


2

If you're growing from a rhizome it's going to take a couple of years until you get a good yield. Recommended to me by the head of NZHops was to actually take a clipping at the beginning of the season. If you have any hop farm nearby, they are usually more than happy to give you one. The soil you grow it in is super important, It needs to be fairly well ...


2

I've grown my own yeast out of bottles before. Basically, all you're doing is making a very small yeast starter and pitching the dregs of a bottle into it and growing it up from there. I usually start with 25ml - 50ml out of a bottle and then step it up a couple of times until I'm making a 1000ml starter for a batch of brew. I've had luck doing this with ...


2

Just a comment. The intense privacy of brewers has faded over time as legitimate strains of mosts yeasts have been made public. Typically, the brewers who sought intense privacy would need to pasturize then bottle condition with another strain prior to distribution. Look for ales specifically, that bottle condition and are organic, made in the US. ...


2

The experts say that the "ideal" growing conditions for hops are between the 34th and 55th latitudes in both the northern and southern hemispheres. All of Florida is well below 34 degrees north latitude, so it is not an "ideal" location to grow hops. The reason is that the days are shorter below the 34th latitude, so the plants don't get enough sunshine. ...


1

Homebrew legend Dan Listermann has written about his barley growing experience in Ohio. He harvested 10% as much as he planted! Keep in mind that if you grow barley, you have to malt it. It's not too hard to make crappy malt, but it's really hard to make good malt. If someone is thinking of growing and malting their own barley, they should do it for the ...


1

Most hops in the US are grown in the Yakima valley, technically a desert. Watering hops may be necessary depending where you are located but let me assure you any water there would be irrigation from the grower, as there is little or no rainfall. Dripline has been recommended on many sites and I would predict this is the standard of the region.


1

It being sunny and warm where you are you aren't really all that limited. Just keep them well watered and aerated and you should be able to get a couple harvests from any hop bine you plant in a single growing season. Of course it will take a year or two before you are really bringing in good multiple harvests.


1

I'm not an expert on this by any means, given that I've never harvested, but I've read about it a bit, so I'll give an answer to get the discussion going on this interesting question. The "yeast" chapter of How to Brew touches on this subject. You can harvest the yeast from any beer that's bottle conditioned. For instance, I think most Belgian Trappist ...


1

HA! This is the best discription I've found yet on how to culture your own yeast. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/slanting-yeast-133103/ I also have this book which teaches you handling techniques http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/first-steps-in-yeast-culture.html You can also use yeast from batch to batch, though I'd recommend washing the yeast to ...


1

I haven't actually harvested or grown my own yeast yet, though I really want to. It's about $7.95 per batch for me, and I brew about 3-4 times a month. Adds up for sure. BYO Magazine had a great issue with a bunch of yeast techniques. If you can, find the September 2009 issue. They have a bunch of other articles online. Hopefully TimWeber will chime in ...


1

I've heard of one person trying to grow a few plants he bought online as partially grown plants. UK in the mob so its hard to link you up. You can buy the baby plants or you can buy the less developed rhysome rootlings and try to grow them. They are available to buy online. If you can grow hops in Kent it should be possible in the north. Though I'm no ...



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