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11

Torrified Wheat has been heat treated (kind of "popped")to break the cellular structure, allowing for rapid hydration and allows malt enzymes to more completely attack the starches and protein. Torrified Wheat can be used in place of raw wheat in Belgian style Wit-Beers, also very good for adding body and head, especially to English ales. Since it has not ...


9

There are basically two ways of making gluten-free beer: Use gluten-free ingredients, like sorghum, buckwheat, millet, quinoa etc. It's doable, but it's likely it won't taste quite like "regular" beer. Use enzymes to break down the gluten, something like Brewers Clarex, which is sold by White Labs as "Clarity-Ferm". This stuff is added with the yeast and ...


6

I know I will never hand-crank a mill again :) That said, the type of mill you linked would not be useful for crushing grain. That's a food mill, which is used to squish soft foods through a steel grate. It would be good for crushing fruits for adding to beer, but not for crushing grain. If that's what you're looking for, you want a grain mill, which ...


3

Basically, soak the barley until it starts to sprout. When you malt, you are letting the seed (grain) start to germinate, so it produces enzymes and starts converting its starches into sugars. There is a pretty detailed how-to article by Dan Carol that has been around for a while.


3

There's a ton of information on gluten free brewing over on the Homebrew Talk Gluten Free Forum. One of the more interesting things I saw over there was the use of roasted chestnuts to replace the malt extract when making gluten free beer. I tried it last fall, and while it wasn't perfect, it was much better than any of the commercial sorghum beers that I'...


3

BYO did a story on Gluten-Free brewing in their Mar/Apr 2007 issue. The online version is here. This includes an all-grain recipe for those who are brave enough to malt their own sorghum. There is an extract version of the recipe here which uses Briess sorghum syrup and honey as fermentables.


2

Malting is a simple process, theoretically, but getting it right can be tricky. I'm not speaking from experience; I've never tried it, but I have read about it. It's a topic that probably can't be fully answered in a single post here, but I can point you to a source of more information. There's an inexpensive book you might want to pick up: The Homebrewer'...


2

To expand from Chris Dargis's comments, specialty grains are called that because they contribute more flavor than they do fermentable sugars. In extract and partial mash brewing (what you're looking at doing), the fermentable sugars come mostly from your extract, where the specialty grains supplement the beer by contributing other characteristics such as ...


2

Sound more like a Cream Ale recipe, Blonde Ale shouldn't have corn. It can be up to 25% wheat though, I would replace the flaked corn with flaked wheat, or just 2-row to remove it completely. I've done this Strawberry Blonde before, it turned out nice. Used real strawberries, ditched the fruit extract, did all grain. Recipe is in the dl docs. https://www....


2

Pilsner malt is known for having a grainy flavor. Try switching to American 2-Row.


1

I think wheat when I think fruit beers. So I'd say 1:1 replacement with wheat. You could experiment with traditional malted, flaked or torrified wheat. In some ways, the are similar in others they are not. I like torrified wheat used in small amounts like you need here as a substitute. I'd also suggest table sugar at a lower replacement ratio. This ...


1

You will be fine, it will either get consumed or diluted as you grow and divide your plant.


1

You can bring in a grainy taste during mashing and sparging. Take a look at your procedure and make sure that you are not over-sparging. Edit: Another thing: What was your original and final gravity? It may be that your fermentation did not complete.


1

Most likely the culprit is incorrect base malt, as well as no dry hopping. IPAs of this gravity need a massive dose of hops to keep their hop-forward character. This does not appear to be a DFH 90 minute clone. The real beer is continually hopped, and most clone recipes call for a large amount of dry hops as well. Also, you should be using American Pale 2-...



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