Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

2-row: Favored by European brewers Lower protein content Yields greater theoretical extract Tend to be more uniform in kernel size (better for less-sophisticated mills) 6-row: Grows better in the U.S. and is cheaper, so used by big domestic breweries More enzymes and husks help with adjunct cereals (so good for e.g. an oatmeal stout) Higher protein ...


8

Taste wise you're going to get a slightly more grainy flavor out of 6 row. Biologically 6 row has more diastic power and is better used for converting starchy adjuncts. You also will get about 2ppg more out of 6 row than you will 2 row. But quite frankly, today's 2 row is well modified and has enough diastic power to convert a large amount of starchy ...


7

Honestly, there's often more than 5ºL variation between batches of crystal by the same maltster, so I'd probably just buy the 80L and be done with it. But, if you want to try to be more precise, the Morey equation for SRM (which is what most software uses) just assumes a linear proportional effect. So, you'd want 3 parts 80ºL to 1 part 60ºL. In other ...


6

I made a smoked porter about two months ago, and it turned out great. I used charcoal and applewood in my cylindrical smoker (they run about $40 at Lowe's). My LHBS advised that I should smoke the base malt before milling, but since I didn't have a mill I ended up milling first and then smoking. I placed a few pounds at a time on the top rack of the smoker ...


6

Multiply your base malt weight by .75 do get the same (ish) amount in liquid extract. For example - 10lbs. Pilsner malt = 7.5lbs Pilsner Liquid Malt Extract For a Dry Malt Extract multiply by .6. For example - 10lbs malt = 6lbs. Dry Malt Extract Steep specialty grains as usual.


6

Are you able to adjust the mill, so that it can mill more coarsely than you would want for flour? If so, I think you should be all set. When brewing all grain, you want a pretty coarse grind; you essentially just want to crack the kernels open, rather than pulverize them. This leaves the husks in tact, and they serve as a filter bed during the sparge ...


6

Special B and CaraPils are as different as night and day, so it's going to be hard to compare them directly. Special B is a very dark Crystal Malt (about 140-150L), typically Belgian in origin, which is used to add flavors like: very dark caramel, raisin, or plum. It is the specialty grain that makes Belgian Amber Abbey Ales taste a bit raisin-like, and ...


6

Milled grain does have a shorter shelf-life, but you don't need to worry about it unless you are trying to mill more than a month in advance. I used to get my grain milled and shipped to me and I would use it when I got around to doing a brew. I never noticed major taste differences within about a month of being milled, and I was just using cardboard boxes ...


6

It was a lucky guess. There is nothing in that grist bill specific to an IPA. AAMOF, it's NOT an IPA! The OG is too low, for one thing. The recipe even calls itself a pale ale, not an IPA. As to what makes an IPA an IPA, the best ROT is the BU:GU ratio. An IPA will usually be in the 1.060-1.075 OG range and have at least a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.


5

Crop yields vary vastly depending on soil conditions, amount of rainfall, fertilization, pest control, etc. On my family's farm, there are places where the wheat grows tall and thick, and less than 10 feet away, plants are so thin and sparse that it would almost be better to let that area go fallow. In any case, crop yields for barley tend to range between ...


5

Assuming we're dealing with just basic malted wheat, and plain ol' 2-row malted barley... Your malted barley has a clean smooth lightly malted flavor. It has enough diastic power to convert itself and other adjuncts, up to 10% of it's own weight. It is relatively low in protein, and easy to mash with a single infusion. Barley can be used for 100% of a mash. ...


5

I've done all of the following in extract + grains brewing with 1 - 4 lbs of grain and I can honestly say I've never noticed a difference in the final product: Remove grain bag from brew kettle, place in bowl, pour hot water over it, press it with spoon, add liquid back to kettle. Remove grain bag from kettle, hold above kettle while spraying with hose. ...


5

If you're grinding a small amount of grain for a partial mash or speciality grain additions to an extract brew, you could use a Corona mill. They don't provide a particularly good crush, and your efficiency will suffer, but if the bulk your fermentables comes from extract, it won't matter too much. And it'll be miles better than a food processor. You can ...


5

First, keep in mind that Mr. wizard is a commercial brewer and his answers come from that point of view. It may not be applicable to homebrewers. Using wheat may be about the only case where using a protein rest may be of benefit. But it'a not a given. There are still proteolytic enzymes left in the malt. Due to the high protein content of wheat, it can ...


5

That means you would use it at 3-15% of your total grain bill. Let's say you had a recipe that used used 10lbs of grain in total. They are recommending that you wouldn't want more than 4.8oz-1.5lb of this amount to be Biscuit Malt. They suggest these limits, because the flavors imparted by these grains can possibly overwhelm other components of the beer. ...


4

Matt's formula is what I've seen in several places. However, I'd add to that, that you should check the malt chart here (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Malts_Chart) as well. In particular, note the "Mash Req." column, which indicates that a particular grain has to be mashed. If you're doing extract brewing, any ingredient that requires mashing ...


4

The best way to do it is with a grain mill. By buying in bulk, you can use the savings to amortize the cost of a mill pretty quickly. If you have a friend who also brews, you can go in together on a mill to cut the cost. The ease of use and increased efficiency from a proper crush will make you glad you got the right tool for the job.


4

I've brewed with 3 year old grain before and the results were mixed. Light beers weren't great, just tasted like stale grain, and they had a haze that didn't settle out completely, even after 6 months. The old grain worked best in darker beers, where you can get most of the flavor from some fresh speciality malt. I had 200lb of grain to get through, but ...


4

Grain, and foodstuffs in general should be stored in a cool, dry area, since the warm temperature can increase the rate of staling. It depends upon how long the grain will be around for. If you can use it up within 6 months then I doubt you would notice much change, especially if it's stored in a sealed container.


4

You can scale malt, hops and volumes linearly. While in principle hops don't scale linearly, it's almost linear, and depends upon your kettle geometry. It's not enough of a difference to worry about - the difference is less than the error introduced due to measuring your hops to the nearest 0.1g. Evaporation is also due to kettle geometry, although this ...


4

The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) makes an attempt to describe styles such as this. One such style is IPA (grouped into 3 subcategories: English IPA, American IPA, and Imperial IPA). Have a look: http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/style14.php You're right that the hop character defines the IPA style. However, a traditional IPA has some restrictions on ...


3

I have put malt in a 1 gallon ziplock bag and crushed it with a rolling pin. I have done up to 5 pounds that way in the past. It was touch but it worked. I am sure efficiency suffered. Although, I never experienced any tannin issues from over crushing the hulls. I have also used the bottom of a flat drinking glass. But that was just for a few ounces and ...


3

I am planning on buying a Country Living Mill, and I am both baking and brewing. I was researching if the mill could be used for crushing malt as well. A lot of people have been asking this question, but I've only found one person actually having tried it. According to him it crushes the malt nicely and leaves the husks. Here is the link: ...


3

Unless you actually have the ingredients in your hands, you just have to take someone's word for it. Once you have your ingredients, chew a few grains of malt. They should be hard and "steely", not soft and mushy. Hops should smell like hops...if they have a "cheesy" aroma or no aroma at all, they're old. You can also ask when the hops were harvested. ...


3

I neeeeever quite get all the little bits unstuck. Fortunately brewing is rather forgiving. Any little bits that still make it will just end up going along for the ride in the next batch. The wort is still being boiled, so any baddies hanging out in the few specks of grain aren't going to make it through. Dunk it in star-san just beforehand if you want ...


3

My process usually looks like this: Empty as much of the bag out into the trash as I can Rinse the bag under running water, getting off whatever bits I can from the outside Turn the bag inside-out Continue to rinse under running water, while mashing and rubbing the bag together in my hands I find that the last step does a pretty good job, and the rubbing ...


3

I had to dig quickly in case this votes to close (why?), but here's your answer: Why is 2-Row more plump, generally, than 6-Row? The two types of malting barley get their name from the way the kernels grow on the stalk. Two rows of kernels grow on a 2-Row stalk and six rows of kernels grow on a 6-Row stalk. The 2-row kernels simply have more room. The ...


3

I disagree with Denny's assessment. Compare the theoretical results of not crushing them to grinding them into a powder. The the first case you'll get little flavor/color; in the second you get maximum flavor/color. So the crush does indeed have an important impact. The key is to do it the same way every time for consistency brew to brew. That way an ...


2

When I did partial-mash batches, I usually placed the bag of grain in a mesh strainer above my brew pot and poured my sparge water over the bag. It helps to find a strainer wide enough so that it's handles rest on the rim of your pot, otherwise you'll need a brave friend to hold it while you pour your sparge water.


2

Fly sparging is not necessarily more efficient than batch sparging. Grain bed channeling is not an issue in batch sparging. Crush is always the first place to look in efficiency issues. My mantra is "Crush til you're scared!". I average 85% efficiency. I never do a protein rest. I never do more than a single batch sparge. 99.9% of the time I do a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible